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knee rehabilitation

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161. Sprains and strains

Sprains and strains Sprains and strains - NICE CKS Share Sprains and strains: Summary A sprain is a stretch and/or tear of a ligament caused by applying abnormal or excessive force to a joint. The ankles, knees, wrists, and thumbs are most commonly affected. A strain (or 'pull') is a stretch and/or tear of muscle fibres caused by stretching the muscle beyond its limits or forcing it to contract too strongly. The foot, leg (typically the hamstring), and back are most commonly affected. Sprains (...) instability. Grade II — partial rupture of the ligament complex without joint instability. Grade III — complete rupture of the ligament complex with instability of the joint. They typically occur in the ankles, knees, wrists, and thumbs. A strain (or 'pull') is a stretch and/or tear of muscle fibres and/or tendon (fibrous cord of tissue that attaches muscles to bone). Strains are classified by severity as : First-degree (mild) strain — only a few muscle fibres are stretched or torn. Although the injured

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

162. Plantar fasciitis

, but not always, localized around the medial calcaneal tuberosity). Limited ankle dorsiflexion range (with the knee in extension) and a positive 'Windlass test' (reproduction of pain by extension of the first metatarsophalangeal joint). An antalgic gait (abnormal walking to avoid pain) or limping. Differential diagnosis includes: Achilles tendonitis. Calcaneal stress fractures. Fat pad atrophy. Sub-calcaneal bursitis. Other less common neurological and musculoskeletal causes such as nerve entrapment (...) . Tenderness on palpation of the plantar heel area (usually, localized around the medial calcaneal tuberosity) is a defining sign of plantar fasciitis. Limited ankle dorsiflexion range (with the knee in extension) and a positive 'Windlass test' (reproduction of pain by extension of the first metatarsophalangeal joint) is suggestive of plantar fasciitis. Abnormal walking/limping due to pain may be observed. Investigations are not useful in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. If clinical signs of plantar

2015 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

163. Olecranon bursitis

topic on . Septic arthritis — the joint is swollen (with absence of localized bursal swelling) and there is a limited, painful range of movement on joint examination. Secondary septic arthritis can also be a rare complication of olecranon bursitis. Gout or, rarely, pseudogout — joints (for example the first metatarsophalangeal joint in gout, or knee or wrist in pseudogout) may have been affected in the past, and laboratory examination of aspiration fluid will show crystals. Acute gout may occur

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

164. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (trochanteric bursitis)

conditions such as low back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. Over 90% of people with greater trochanteric pain syndrome recover fully with conservative treatment such as rest, pain relief, physiotherapy, and corticosteroid injection. Risk factors for a poorer outcome include higher initial pain intensity, longer duration of pain, greater movement restriction, higher functional impairment, and older age. The diagnosis of greater trochanteric pain syndrome is made (...) pain syndrome frequently occurs together with other conditions [ ; ]: Lumbar spine conditions, such as osteoarthritis, degenerative disc disease, and radiculopathy. Osteoarthritis of the knee, especially on the affected side. Hip osteoarthritis (on the affected or unaffected side). Rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia. Obesity and leg length discrepancy may be associated with greater trochanteric pain syndrome [ ]. Incidence and prevalence How common is it? Greater trochanteric pain syndrome affects

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

165. Pre-patellar bursitis

DL, Durrani SK ( 2010 ) A review of occupational knee disorders. Journal of occupational rehabilitation 20 ( 4 ), 489 - 501 . Smith,D.L., McAfee,J.H., Lucas,L.M., et al. ( 1989 ) Treatment of nonseptic olecranon bursitis. A controlled, blinded prospective trial. Archives of Internal Medicine. 149 ( 11 ), 2527 - 2530 . [ ] Wood L, Muller S, Peat G ( 2011 ) The epidemiology of patellofemoral disorders in adulthood: a review of routine general practice morbidity recording. Primary Health Care (...) and compressible) — the patella may not be palpable with large collections of fluid. A normal range of joint movement (depending on the size of the fluid collection). Maximal discomfort at extreme flexion of the knee (when the swollen bursa is compressed). A history of preceding trauma or bursal disease (from previous traumatic bursitis, rheumatoid arthritis, or gout). Differentiation between septic and non-septic bursitis is difficult and aspiration may be needed to exclude infection. Clinical features

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

166. Assessment and Management of Foot Ulcers for People with Diabetes, Second Edition

“Pathogenesis and general management of foot lesions in the diabetic patient,” by M. E. Levin, 2001, in J. H. Bowker & M. A. Pfeifer (eds.), Levin and O’Neals The Diabetic Foot (6th ed.), p. 222. St. Louis, MO: Mosby, Inc. Copyright Elsevier (2001). Ulcers and amputations result in enormous societal costs, including lost wages, job loss, prolonged hospitalization, lengthy rehabilitation and an increased need for home care and social services. Given the data on the burden of illness and the significant long

2013 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

167. Promoting Safety: Alternative Approaches to the Use of Restraints

Geriatric Health Care System T oronto, Ontario Assistant Professor New Y ork University College of Nursing Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing New Y ork, NY, USA Athina Perivolaris RN, BScN, MN T eam Leader Advanced Practice Nurse Mental Health/Gerontology, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health T oronto, Ontario Nancy Boaro RN, BScN, MN, CNN(C), CRN(C) Advanced Practice Leader, Neuro Program T oronto Rehabilitation Institute T oronto, Ontario Lisa Casselman BSc, BSW, MSW, RSW Mental Health (...) Ottawa Mental Health Centre Professional Development, Crisis Prevention Instructor Ottawa, Ontario Kathy Culhane RN Nurse Educator Lady Dunn Health Centre Wawa, Ontario Michelle DaGloria RN, BScN Clinical Educator, Professional Practice Lead Medicine Guelph General Hospital Guelph, Ontario Sylvia Davidson MSc, DipGer, OT Reg.(Ont.) Advanced Practice Leader – Geriatrics T oronto Rehabilitation Institute – University Centre T oronto, Ontario Nicole Didyk MD, FRCP(C) Geriatrician St. Mary’s Hospital

2012 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

168. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome

recommend a formal audiometric evaluation every 5 years regardless of the initial age at diagnosis, initial hearing threshold levels, karyotype and/or presence of a mid-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, to assure early and adequate technical and other rehabilitative measures (⨁⨁◯◯). R 6.2. We recommend aggressive treatment of middle-ear disease and otitis media (OM) with antibiotics and placement of myringotomy tubes as indicated (⨁⨁◯◯). R 6.3. We recommend screening for hypothyroidism at diagnosis

2017 European Society of Endocrinology

169. Diagnosis and Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

limb Hospitalization for heart failure or atrial fibrillation/flutter (within previous 3 months) Hip or knee replacement Major trauma Myocardial infarction (within previous 3 months) Previous VTE Spinal cord injury Moderate risk factors (OR 2–9) Arthroscopic knee surgery Autoimmune diseases Blood transfusion Central venous lines Intravenous catheters and leads Chemotherapy Congestive heart failure or respiratory failure Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents Hormone replacement therapy (depends (...) Varicose veins Strong risk factors (OR > 10) Fracture of lower limb Hospitalization for heart failure or atrial fibrillation/flutter (within previous 3 months) Hip or knee replacement Major trauma Myocardial infarction (within previous 3 months) Previous VTE Spinal cord injury Moderate risk factors (OR 2–9) Arthroscopic knee surgery Autoimmune diseases Blood transfusion Central venous lines Intravenous catheters and leads Chemotherapy Congestive heart failure or respiratory failure Erythropoiesis

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2019 European Society of Cardiology

171. Neuro-urology

, 1977. 40: 358. 310. Krasmik, D., et al. Urodynamic results, clinical efficacy, and complication rates of sacral intradural deafferentation and sacral anterior root stimulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction resulting from complete spinal cord injury. Neurourol Urodyn, 2014. 33: 1202. 311. Benard, A., et al. Comparative cost-effectiveness analysis of sacral anterior root stimulation for rehabilitation of bladder dysfunction in spinal cord injured patients. Neurosurgery

2018 European Association of Urology

172. Clinical practice guideline for the management of patients with Parkinson´s disease

of Navarre Clinic. Pamplona. Juan Antonio Martín Jiménez. Doctor of Medicine, Specialist in Family and Community Medicine. Buenavista Health Centre (SESCAM). Toledo. María Carmen Martínez Garre. Doctor of Medicine, Specialist in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Vall d’Hebron University Hospital. Barcelona. Mª Elena Martínez Rodríguez. Doctor of Medicine, Specialist in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Ramón y Cajal University Hospital. Madrid.CliniCal praCtiCe guidelines in the sns 11 Juan (...) and Community Medicine (SemFYC) Spanish Society of General and Family Physicians (SEMG) Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (SEMERGEN) Spanish Neurology Society (SEN) Spanish Psychiatry Society (SEP) Spanish Biological Psychiatry Society (SEPB) Spanish Society of Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine (SERMEF) Members of these societies participated as authors, collaborating experts, or external reviewers of this CPG. Declaration of interest: All members of the working group, as well as those who have

2015 GuiaSalud

173. Recovering after radiation therapy: A guide for women

and on your pelvic health and sexual wellbeing. This booklet suggests ways that may reduce the impact of the cancer and its treatment on your pelvic health. The booklet also provides information on radiation treatment side effects and recommended rehabilitation options which may help follow-up pelvic examinations to be performed more comfortably. “Knowing what was going on helped me greatly. I believe knowledge is power. ”6. 7. 2 Understanding your body Below are some diagrams and information about (...) dilators provided for you to use as part of your post-treatment rehabilitation are intended to help maintain as much softness and flexibility in the vaginal tissue as possible. Pain Following radiotherapy, the vagina may feel tender and sensitive. Apprehension and fear that it may hurt when touching, rubbing or when penetration takes place, may cause an involuntary tightening of the pelvic floor muscles and increase any pain already felt (see pages 28-29). Lymphoedema (swelling of legs) When the lymph

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

174. Recovering after radiation therapy: A guide for women

and recommended rehabilitation options which may help follow-up pelvic examinations to be performed more comfortably. “Knowing what was going on helped me greatly. I believe knowledge is power. ”6. 7. 2 Understanding your body Below are some diagrams and information about the female anatomy to help you understand the parts of your body likely to be affected by pelvic radiation therapy and the possible side effects of that treatment. The female reproductive system Reproduced with permission by Cancer Council (...) comfortable (see page 27). Reduced vaginal flexibility and size Vaginal rigidity and scar tissue may lead to a feeling that the vagina is shorter or less flexible since the vagina will have lost the ability to soften and stretch to the degree that it previously had. The vaginal dilators provided for you to use as part of your post-treatment rehabilitation are intended to help maintain as much softness and flexibility in the vaginal tissue as possible. Pain Following radiotherapy, the vagina may feel

2015 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

175. Occupational therapy for people with Parkinson's disease

and Neurosurgery, London. Jill now works in independent practice undertaking consultancy, training and service development projects within neurological occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Specialist Section Neurological Practice In partnership withAbout the publisher www.cot.org.uk The College of Occupational Therapists is a wholly owned subsidiary of the British Association of Occupational Therapists (BAOT) and operates as a registered charity. It represents the profession nationally and internationally (...) concludes that ‘there is inadequate evidence to evaluate the effect of occupational therapy for people with Parkinson’s disease’ (Dixon et al 2009). Nevertheless, emergent evidence and anecdotal clinical experience suggest that many functional and psychosocial issues that persist despite good medical management of Parkinson’s appear to be responsive to a condition- specifi c rehabilitative approach, such as the client- centred form of occupational therapy detailed in these Best Practice Guidelines

2010 British Association of Occupational Therapists

177. Occupational Therapy for people Undergoing total hip replacement

replacements and 9,000 revisions were carried out in England and Wales (National Joint Registry 2011, p35). Yet although the role of occupational therapy is well established and recognised (British Orthopaedic Association 2006), there are rapid changes in the face of practice – not only in the timings of interventions but in the age and range of people needing rehabilitation. Occupational therapists are treating more people of working age who have had hip replacements as well as continuing to treat (...) . Maximised functional independence ?1. It is recommended that the occupational therapy assessment is comprehensive and considers factors which may affect individual needs, goals, recovery and rehabilitation, including co-morbidities, trauma history, personal circumstances, obesity and pre-operative function. (Johansson et al 2010 [C]; Lin and Kaplan 2004 [C]; Marks 2008 [C]; Naylor et al 2008 [C]; Ostendorf et al 2004 [C]; Vincent et al 2007 [C]; Vincent et al 2012 [B]; Wang et al 2010 [C]) [New evidence

2018 British Association of Occupational Therapists

178. Management Of Haemophilia

: Physiotherapy Management xii 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. CLINICAL PRESENTATION 2 3. INVESTIGATIONS 4 3.1 Laboratory Tests 4 3.2 Genetic Tests 5 4. GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF CARE 7 4.1 Stratification of Haemophilia Centre with regards to 7 Haemophilia Services 4.2 National Haemophilia Registry 8 5. TREATMENT 10 5.1 Pharmacological Treatment 10 5.1.1 Factor Replacement Therapy 10 5.1.2 Adjunct Therapies 14 5.1.3 Analgesia 16 5.2 Non-pharmacological Treatment 18 5.2.1 Rehabilitation of Musculoskeletal System 18 5.2.2 (...) mother. • Cascade screening for haemophilia should be offered to at least first- and second-degree female relatives if the mother of persons with haemophilia is a confirmed carrier. Pharmacological Treatment • Prophylactic factor infusion should be given to ALL persons with severe haemophilia. • Analgesia should be offered for pain relief according to its severity in haemophilia. Non-pharmacological Treatment • Rehabilitation should be offered in PWH during acute or sub-acute bleeds and those

2018 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

179. Low Back Pain, Adult Acute and Subacute

trial of 600 patients with recurrent low back pain, exercise frequency is more important than exercise type, duration or intensity in low back pain prevention (Steffens, 2016; Aleksiev, 2014). Non-pharmacologic Treatments Directed physical activity Physical activity/exercise may be done by the patient as part of self-care or as part of an active rehabilitation program with a therapist. A study by Fritz (2012) found that early-intervention patients were less likely to have imaging, additional (...) www.icsi.org 23 Re-evaluation If symptoms are not improving, consider that there may be a misdiagnosis, inadequate treatment, patient barriers or alternative non-spine-related factors inhibiting recovery. It is the expert opinion of this working group to instruct the patient to return for the following reasons: • Pain that doesn't seem to be getting better after two to three weeks • Pain and weakness traveling down the leg below the knee • Leg, foot, groin or rectal area feeling numb • Unexplained fever

2018 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

180. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition) ? ? ? ? Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine ? ? ? Endorsed by: Faculty?of?Pain?Medicine,?Royal?College?of? Anaesthetists,?United?Kingdom?? Royal?College?of?Anaesthetists,? United?Kingdom?? Australian?Pain?Society? Australasian?Faculty?of?Rehabilitation?Medicine? College?of?Anaesthesiologists,?? Academy?of?Medicine,?Malaysia? College (...) . It was approved by the NHMRC and published by the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) and its Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM) in 2005. It was also endorsed by a number of major organisations — the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), the Royal College of Anaesthetists (United Kingdom), the Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the Royal Australian and New Zealand

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

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