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121. Cardiovascular disease: identifying and supporting people most at risk of dying early

Adults who are disadvantaged include (but are not limited to): those on a low income (or who are members of a low-income family) those on benefits those living in public or social housing some members of black and minority ethnic groups those with a mental health problem those with a learning disability those who are institutionalised (including those serving a custodial sentence) those who are homeless. Local agencies (such as local authorities and primary care trusts [PCTs]) define disadvantaged

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

122. Acute illness in adults in hospital: recognising and responding to deterioration

to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the patient agrees, families and carers should have the opportunity to be involved in decisions about treatment and care. Families and carers should also be given the information and support they need. Acutely ill adults in hospital: recognising and responding to deterioration (CG50) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk (...) status and any agreed limitations of treatment Acutely ill adults in hospital: recognising and responding to deterioration (CG50) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 9 of 26physical and rehabilitation needs psychological and emotional needs specific communication or language needs. Acutely ill adults in hospital: recognising and responding to deterioration (CG50) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject

2007 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

123. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy): diagnosis and management

Appendix D: Definitions used in this guideline 49 About this guideline 53 Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy): diagnosis and management (CG53) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 54Introduction Introduction Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)/myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy) (ME) is a relatively common illness. The physical symptoms can be as disabling (...) variability in the symptoms different people experience. CFS/ME is characterised by debilitating fatigue that is unlike everyday fatigue and can be triggered by minimal activity. This raises especially complex issues in adults and children with severe CFS/ME. CFS/ME, like other chronic conditions for which the causes and disease processes are not yet fully understood, poses significant problems for healthcare professionals. It can cause profound, prolonged illness and disability, which has a substantial

2007 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

125. Borderline personality disorder: recognition and management

disorder and learning disabilities Borderline personality disorder and learning disabilities 1.1.2.1 When a person with a mild learning disability presents with symptoms and behaviour that suggest borderline personality disorder, assessment and diagnosis should take place in consultation with a specialist in learning disabilities services. 1.1.2.2 When a person with a mild learning disability has a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder, they should have access to the same services as other (...) people with borderline personality disorder. 1.1.2.3 When care planning for people with a mild learning disability and borderline personality disorder, follow the Care Programme Approach (CPA). Consider consulting a specialist in learning disabilities services when developing care plans and strategies for managing behaviour that challenges. 1.1.2.4 People with a moderate or severe learning disability should not normally be diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. If they show behaviour

2009 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

126. Antisocial personality disorder: prevention and management

interventions entions For people with antisocial personality disorder with a history of offending behaviour who are in community and institutional care, consider offering group-based cognitive and behavioural interventions (for example, programmes such as 'reasoning and rehabilitation') focused on reducing offending and other antisocial behaviour. Multi-agency care Multi-agency care Antisocial personality disorder: prevention and management (CG77) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice (...) , in particular key workers, working with people with antisocial personality disorder should establish regular one-to-one meetings to review progress, even when the primary mode of treatment is group based. 1.1.2 1.1.2 P People with disabilities and acquired cognitiv eople with disabilities and acquired cognitive impairments e impairments 1.1.2.1 When a person with learning or physical disabilities or acquired cognitive impairments presents with symptoms and behaviour that suggest antisocial personality

2009 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

127. Workplace health: long-term sickness absence and incapacity to work

situation, any barriers to returning to work (for example, work relationships) and their perceived confidence and ability to overcome these barriers their current or previous rehabilitation experiences the tasks they carry out at work – and their functional capacity to perform them (dealing with issues such as mobility, strength and fitness) any workplace or work equipment modifications that are needed in line with the Disability Discrimination Act (including ergonomic modifications). If a return (...) 41 Jobcentre Plus 41 Job interview guarantee 42 Job introduction scheme 42 Long-term sickness absence (including recurring long-term sickness absence) 42 Manual therapy 42 Mindful employer 42 Multimodal programme 42 New Deal for Disabled People (NDDP) 43 NHS Regional employability programmes 43 Operant conditioning behavioural approach 43 Presenteeism 43 Progressive goal attainment programme 43 Workplace health: long-term sickness absence and incapacity to work (PH19) © NICE 2018. All rights

2009 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

128. Autism in adults: diagnosis and management

Functional analysis 47 Hyper- and hypo-sensory sensitivities 47 Informant 47 Learning disability 47 Modelling 48 Reinforcement 48 Update information 49 About this guideline 50 Autism spectrum disorder in adults: diagnosis and management (CG142) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 50This guideline is the basis of QS51. Introduction Introduction Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental condition, the core (...) features of which are persistent difficulties in social interaction and communication and the presence of stereotypic (rigid and repetitive) behaviours, resistance to change or restricted interests. The way that autism is expressed in individual people differs at different stages of life, in response to interventions, and with the presence of coexisting conditions such as learning disabilities (also called 'intellectual disabilities'). People with autism also commonly experience difficulty

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

129. Stable angina: management

-invasive functional testing 19 2.3 Early revascularisation strategy for people with angina and multivessel disease 20 2.4 Cardiac rehabilitation 20 2.5 Patient self-management plans 21 Update information 22 Stable angina: management (CG126) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 22This guideline partially replaces TA73. This guideline is the basis of QS21 and QS181. Introduction Introduction (...) . It should be supported by evidence-based written information tailored to the patient's needs. Treatment and care, and the information patients are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the patient agrees, families and carers should have the opportunity to be involved in decisions about treatment and care. Families and carers

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

130. Self-harm in over 8s: long-term management

and care, and the information service users are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the service user agrees, families, carers and significant others [1] should have the opportunity to be involved in decisions about treatment and care. Families, carers and significant others should also be given the information and support (...) for psychological intervention, social care and support, occupational rehabilitation, and also drug treatment for any associated conditions the needs of any dependent children. Risk assessment Risk assessment When assessing the risk of repetition of self-harm or risk of suicide, identify and agree with the person who self-harms the specific risks for them, taking into account: methods and frequency of current and past self-harm current and past suicidal intent depressive symptoms and their relationship to self

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

131. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in adults: diagnosis and management

If appropriate after each assessment, offer pulmonary rehabilitation including exercise and educational components tailored to the needs of people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in general. 1.5.4 Pulmonary rehabilitation should be tailored to the individual needs of each person with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Sessions should be held somewhere that is easy for people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis to get to and has good access for people with disabilities. Best supportiv Best supportive care e (...) -and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 22Contents Contents Introduction 4 Patient-centred care 5 Key priorities for implementation 6 Awareness of clinical features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis 6 Diagnosis 6 Information and support 7 Pulmonary rehabilitation 7 Best supportive care 8 Disease-modifying pharmacological interventions 8 Lung transplantation 9 Review and follow-up 9 1 Recommendations 10 1.1 Awareness of clinical features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis 10 1.2 Diagnosis 10 1.3 Information

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

132. Unstable angina and NSTEMI: early management

people with a learning disability. See Changes after publication for details. The term 'acute coronary syndromes' encompasses a range of conditions from unstable angina to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), arising from thrombus formation on an atheromatous plaque. This guideline addresses the early management of unstable angina and non- ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) once a firm diagnosis has been made and before discharge from hospital. If untreated (...) -based written information tailored to the patient's needs. Treatment and care, and the information patients are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the patient agrees, families and carers should have the opportunity to be involved in decisions about treatment and care. Families and carers should also be given the information

2010 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

133. Common mental health problems: identification and pathways to care

[1] , may affect up to 15% of the population at any one time. Depression and anxiety disorders can have a lifelong course of relapse and remission. There is considerable variation in the severity of common mental health disorders, but all can be associated with significant long-term disability. For example, depression is estimated to be the second greatest contributor to disability- adjusted life years throughout the developed world. It is also associated with high levels of morbidity (...) Capacity Act. In Wales, healthcare professionals should follow advice on consent from the Welsh Government. Good communication between healthcare professionals and patients is essential. It should be supported by evidence-based written information tailored to the patient's needs. Treatment and care, and the information patients are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

134. Fractures (complex): assessment and management

the person and their family members or carers (as appropriate) in a full discussion of the options if this is possible. 1.2.25 Base the decision whether to perform limb salvage or delayed primary amputation on multidisciplinary assessment involving an orthopaedic surgeon, a plastic surgeon, a rehabilitation specialist and the person and their family members or carers (as appropriate). 1.2.26 When indicated, perform the delayed primary amputation within 72 hours of injury. Debridement, staging of fix (...) ) amputation, if this is a possibility activities they can do to help themselves home care options, if needed rehabilitation, including whom to contact and how (this should include information on Fractures (complex): assessment and management (NG37) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 15 of 20the importance of active patient participation for achieving goals and the expectations of rehabilitation) mobilisation

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

135. Canadian stroke best practice recommendations: acute inpatient stroke care guidelines, update 2015

the third leading cause of death in Canada and a leading cause of disability. 4 Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and TIA are treated in Canadian hospitals. Moreover, it is estimated that for each symp- tomatic stroke, there are nine ‘‘silent’’ strokes that result in subtle changes in cognitive function and processes. 3 The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations (CSBPR) are intended to provide up-to-date evidence-based guidelines for the preven- tion and management of stroke (...) , and to promote optimal recovery and reintegration for people who have experienced stroke (patients, families and infor- mal caregivers). The CSBPR are evidence-based guidelines that are updated and released every two to three years, with interim updates of speci?c topics when critical new evidence emerges. 5 They address the continuum of stroke care from stroke symptom onset through the hyperacute and acute inpatient care periods, to rehabilitation and longer-term recovery. Acute stroke care speci?cally

2015 CPG Infobase

136. Osteoarthritis: care and management

' (NICE clinical guideline 59). The recommendations are labelled according to when they were originally published (see Update information for details). Osteoarthritis refers to a clinical syndrome of joint pain accompanied by varying degrees of functional limitation and reduced quality of life. It is the most common form of arthritis, and one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide. The most commonly affected peripheral joints are the knees, hips and small hand joints. Pain, reduced (...) or disability. Exercise should include: local muscle strengthening and and general aerobic fitness. It has not been specified whether exercise should be provided by the NHS or whether the healthcare professional should provide advice and encouragement to the person to obtain and carry out the intervention themselves. Exercise has been found to be beneficial but the clinician needs to make a judgement in each case on how to effectively ensure participation. This will depend upon the person's individual needs

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

137. Weight management: lifestyle services for overweight or obese adults

authorities, NHS England and Public Health England Recommendation 5 Recommendation 5 Public Health England, local authorities, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups Recommendation 6 Recommendation 6 General practice teams and other health or social care professionals who give advice about, or refer people to, lifestyle weight management programmes. This includes professionals working in: cardiac rehabilitation, diabetes, disability, fertility, postnatal, rheumatology and smoking

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

138. Multiple sclerosis in adults: management

and explain that it may increase the progression of disability. (See the NICE guideline on stop smoking interventions and services.) 1.5 MS symptom management and rehabilitation The guideline does not make recommendations for all symptoms that occur in people with MS. Some symptoms are addressed in other NICE guidelines and these are referenced where appropriate. 1.5.1 Determine how often the person with MS will need to be seen based on: their needs, and those of their family and carers (...) Introduction 5 Drug recommendations 6 Key priorities for implementation 7 Diagnosing MS 7 Information and support 7 Coordination of care 8 MS symptom management and rehabilitation 8 Treating acute relapse of MS with steroids 8 1 Recommendations 9 1.1 Diagnosing MS 9 1.2 Providing information and support 11 1.3 Coordination of care 12 1.4 Modifiable risk factors for relapse or progression of MS 13 1.5 MS symptom management and rehabilitation 14 1.6 Comprehensive review 18 1.7 Relapse and exacerbation 20 1.8

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

139. Physical activity: exercise referral schemes

programmes in the management of, and rehabilitation following, a health condition 11 Box 2 The importance of physical activity in promoting good health and preventing disease 12 2 Who should take action? 13 Introduction 13 Who should do what at a glance 13 3 Context 14 Introduction 14 Lack of physical activity: the costs 15 National guidelines, resources and indicators 15 4 Considerations 17 Background 17 Evidence of effectiveness 18 Economic modelling 19 Scenarios of effectiveness 21 Physical activity (...) : exercise referral schemes (PH54) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 46Barriers to success 22 5 Recommendations for research 24 6 Glossary 26 Brief advice 26 Inactive 26 Level 4 26 Phase 3 and phase 4 rehabilitation activities 26 Process utility 26 Sedentary 26 7 References 28 8 Summary of the methods used to develop this guideline 29 Introduction 29 Guideline development 29 Key questions 29 Reviewing

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

140. Psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people: recognition and management

communicating with children and young people with psychosis or schizophrenia and their parents or carers: take into account the child or young person's developmental level, emotional maturity and cognitive capacity including any learning disabilities, sight or hearing problems or delays in language development use plain language where possible and clearly explain any clinical language check that the child or young person and their parents or carers understand what is being said use communication aids (...) gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, background (including cultural, ethnic and religious background) and any disability be aware of possible variations in the presentation of mental health problems in children and young people of different genders, ages, cultural, ethnic, religious or other diverse backgrounds [2] . [2013] [2013] Psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people: recognition and management (CG155) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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