How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

733 results for

disability rehabilitation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

101. Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hypertension

conditions 44 10 Treatment of associated risk factors 57 11 Clinical Quality Improvement 58 References 59 Self-assessment (MCQs) 72 Workgroup members 74 Foreword In the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study, hypertension is the leading associated risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure accounts for 9.4 million deaths and 7.0% of global disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) worldwide. * These adverse outcomes exceed those due to elevated BMI, fasting plasma glucose, and total (...) health in individuals with cardiovascular risk factors: recommendations from the EACPR (Part II). European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation. 2011. 43 Doll R, Peto R, Wheatley K, Gray R, Sutherland I. Mortality in relation to smoking: 40 years' observations on male British doctors. British Medical Journal. 1994; 309:901-11. 44 Rosenberg L, Kaufman DW, Helmrich SP, Shapiro S. The risk of myocardial infarction after quitting smoking in men under 55 years of age. New England Journal

2017 Ministry of Health, Singapore

102. Global Vascular Guidelines for patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia Full Text available with Trip Pro

, plastic, and orthopedic), interventionalists (radiologists, cardiologists), podiatrists, wound care providers, rehabilitation medicine specialists, orthotists and physical therapists, and trainees in these disciplines. Secondary audiences include referring providers, such as primary care physicians, medical specialists, nurses, and other allied health providers, who may care for the at-risk population and who are critical for awareness and timely specialist referral of patients with suspected CLTI (...) , and infection who are commonly referred to vascular specialists for evaluation and management. Prior terms, such as “critical” and “severe” limb ischemia, connote specific hemodynamic thresholds and fail to recognize the full spectrum and inter-relatedness of components beyond ischemia that contribute to major limb amputation and long-term disability. This is addressed fully in Section 1 of the guideline. Disease staging in CLTI Improved disease staging is mandatory for designing clinical trials, conducting

2019 Society for Vascular Surgery

103. British guideline on the management of asthma

; or Extrapolated evidence from studies rated as 2 + Good-practice points ? Recommended best practice based on the clinical experience of the guideline development group. Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) is committed to equality and diversity and assesses all its publications for likely impact on the six equality groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion/belief and sexual orientation. SIGN guidelines are produced using a standard methodology that has been equality impact assessed to ensure

2019 SIGN

104. Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures

or therapeutic procedure may be minimized, but not completely eliminated, by a careful preprocedure review of the patient’s underlying medical conditions and consideration of how the sedation process might affect or be affected by these conditions: for example, children with developmental disabilities have been shown to have a threefold increased incidence of desaturation compared with children without developmental disabilities. , , Appropriate drug selection for the intended procedure, a clear

2019 American Academy of Pediatrics

105. Hand Pain and Sensory Deficits: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Hand Pain and Sensory Deficits: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Clinical Practice Guidelines MIA ERICKSON, PT , EdD • MARSHA LAWRENCE, PT , DPT • CAROLINE W. STEGINK JANSEN, PT , PhD DIANE COKER, PT , DPT • PETER AMADIO, MD • CARLA CLEARY, PT , DPT Hand Pain and Sensory Deficits: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Clinical Practice Guidelines Linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health From the Academy of Hand and Upper Extremity Physical Therapy and the Academy of Orthopaedic (...) Questionnaire functional scale (CTQ-FS) or the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire to assess function when examining pa- tients with CTS. Clinicians should use the CTQ-SSS to assess change in those undergoing nonsurgical management. EXAMINATION – ACTIVITY LIMITATIONS/ PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE MEASURES C Clinicians may use the Purdue Pegboard (PPB) or the Del- lon-modified Moberg pick-up test (DMPUT) to quantify dexterity at the onset of treatment and compare scores with es- tablished

2019 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

106. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 38Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Rapid recognition of symptoms and diagnosis 5 1.2 Imaging for people who have had a suspected TIA or acute non-disabling stroke 6 1.3 Specialist care for people with acute stroke 7 1.4 Pharmacological treatments and thrombectomy for people with acute stroke 8 1.5 Maintenance or restoration of homeostasis 12 1.6 Nutrition and hydration 14 (...) or acute non-disabling stroke 24 Thrombectomy for people with acute ischaemic stroke 25 Blood pressure control for people with acute intracerebral haemorrhage 28 Optimal positioning for people with acute stroke 30 Early mobilisation for people with acute stroke 30 Decompressive hemicraniectomy for people with acute stroke 31 Context 34 Finding more information and resources 36 Update information 37 Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management (NG128) © NICE 2019

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

107. Alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis, assessment and management of harmful drinking and alcohol dependence

intervention compared with standard care? 38 4.5 For people with moderate and severe alcohol dependence who have significant comorbid problems, is an intensive residential rehabilitation programme clinically and cost effective when compared with intensive community-based care? 39 4.6 For people with alcohol dependence, which medication is most likely to improve adherence and thereby promote abstinence and prevent relapse? 40 5 Other versions of this guideline 41 5.1 Full guideline 41 5.2 Information (...) ' . Good communication between staff and service users is essential. It should be supported by evidence-based written information tailored to the service user's needs. Treatment and care, and the information service users are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the service user agrees, families and carers should have

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

109. Looked-after children and young people

aspects of their lives and care. The PDG therefore examined the wider looked-after children's system and adopted a broad definition of health and wellbeing. Further detail on the evidence is given in section 3 (3.36–3.48) and appendices B and C. The PDG recognised that some groups – for example, disabled children and young people – have specific needs, but it has not made recommendations about all of these. In some cases the evidence was insufficient and the PDG has made some recommendations (...) to address the needs of children and young people with particular needs, including those from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, unaccompanied asylum seekers and those with disabilities. Strategic leadership, planning and commissioning Evidence indicates that high-performing local authorities are those with strong leaders who have an aspirational vision of effective corporate parenting for all looked-after children and young people. These authorities embed partnership and multi-agency working

2010 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

110. Acute kidney injury: prevention, detection and management

with baseline, in adults with acute illness if any of the following are likely or present: chronic kidney disease (adults with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 are at particular risk) heart failure liver disease diabetes history of acute kidney injury oliguria (urine output less than 0.5 ml/kg/hour) neurological or cognitive impairment or disability, which may mean limited access to fluids because of reliance on a carer hypovolaemia use of drugs with nephrotoxic (...) or cognitive impairment or disability, which may mean limited access to fluids because of reliance on a parent or carer hypovolaemia use of drugs with nephrotoxic potential (such as NSAIDs, aminoglycosides, ACE inhibitors, ARBs and diuretics) within the past week, especially if hypovolaemic symptoms or history of urological obstruction, or conditions that may lead to obstruction sepsis a deteriorating paediatric early warning score severe diarrhoea (children and young people with bloody diarrhoea

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

111. Sickle cell disease: managing acute painful episodes in hospital

in Seeking consent: working with children. Good communication between healthcare professionals and patients is essential. It should be supported by evidence-based written information tailored to the patient's needs. Treatment and care, and the information patients are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the patient agrees (...) episode, are non-pharmacological interventions, such as massage, effective in improving their recovery from the episode? Wh Why this is important y this is important There was a lack of evidence on the potential benefits of supportive interventions for patients with an acute painful sickle cell episode. An RCT should be conducted that examines the effect of providing rehabilitation interventions that are aimed at improving a patient's recovery after an acute painful sickle cell episode

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

112. Patient experience in adult NHS services: improving the experience of care for people using adult NHS services

and foster good relations between people who share certain protected characteristics and those who do not. The protected characteristics are age, disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. The Act provides an important legal framework which should improve the experience of all patients using NHS services. Despite these policy initiatives, there is evidence to suggest that further work is needed to deliver the best possible experience (...) . 1.1.2 Ensure that factors such as physical or learning disabilities, sight, speech or hearing problems and difficulties with reading, understanding or speaking English are addressed so that the patient is able to participate as fully as possible in consultations and care. [1] [ [QS] QS] 1.1.3 Ask the patient about and take into account any factors, such as their domestic, social and work situation and their previous experience of healthcare, that may: impact on their health condition

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

113. Spasticity in under 19s: management

or young person and their parents or carers. Treatment and care, and the information people are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. Families and carers should be given the information and support they need. Care of young people in transition between paediatric and adult services should be planned and managed according to the best (...) Identify and agree with children and young people and their parents or carers assessments and goals that: are age and developmentally appropriate focus on the following domains of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: body functions body structures activities and participation environmental factors. 1.1.9 Record the child or young person's individualised goals and share these goals with healthcare professionals in the network team and, where

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

114. Urinary incontinence in neurological disease: assessment and management

of Health's Seeking consent: working with children. Good communication between healthcare professionals and patients is essential. It should be supported by evidence-based written information tailored to the patient's needs. Treatment and care, and the information patients are given about it, should be culturally appropriate. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. If the patient agrees (...) involved in ongoing care (for example, adult neuro-rehabilitation services) provide the person with details of the service to which care is being transferred, including contact details of key personnel, such as the urologist and specialist nurses ensure that urological services are being provided after transition to adult services. 1.11.6 Consider establishing regular multidisciplinary team meetings for paediatric and adult specialists to discuss the management of neurogenic lower urinary tract

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

115. Transition between inpatient hospital settings and community or care home settings for adults with social care needs

of investigations, changes to treatment and the medicines started or stopped, or dosage changes and the reasons why. Early supported discharge Early supported discharge A multidisciplinary service that aims to allow patients to return home from hospital early and receive more rehabilitation support at home. Hospital passport Hospital passport A document for people who have a learning disability. It provides hospital staff with information to help with care planning and discharge arrangements. Medication re (...) -and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 9 of 31changes to their plans for transfer from hospital. 1.4.4 Provide care for older people with complex needs in a specialist, geriatrician-led unit or on a specialist geriatrician-led ward. 1.4.5 Treat people admitted to hospital after a stroke in a stroke unit and offer them early supported discharge. (See recommendations 1.1.8 and 1.1.9 in NICE's guideline on stroke rehabilitation.) 1.4.6 Encourage people to follow their usual daily routines as much as possible

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

116. Workplace health: management practices

Gaps in the evidence 30 Recommendations for research 34 Recommendations for research: older employees 35 Glossary 38 Health and wellbeing 38 Workplace health: management practices (NG13) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 39Leadership 38 Line manager 38 Micro-organisation 38 Occupational health service 38 Presenteeism 38 Vocational rehabilitation 39 Workplace health: management practices (NG13) © (...) increases further. Older people who earn less tend to retire earlier than their middle-income peers, due to ill health and disability (Living in the 21st century: older people in England ELSA 2006 [Wave 3] Institute for Fiscal Studies). They are more likely to have long-term health problems, some of which are attributable to lifestyle behaviours. They also have higher rates of non-work related stress and mental health problems. If people in this group are to work until 68, action is needed to raise

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

117. Violence and aggression: short-term management in mental health, health and community settings

disability settings, 27% against ambulance staff, 25% involving primary care staff and 26% involving acute hospital staff. Violence and aggression in mental health settings occur most frequently in inpatient psychiatric units and most acute hospital assaults take place in emergency departments. The manifestation of violence and aggression depends on a combination of intrinsic factors, such as personality characteristics and intense mental distress, and extrinsic factors, such as the attitudes (...) with a primary diagnosis of learning disability. Safeguarding children Remember that child maltreatment: is common can present anywhere, such as emergency departments and primary care or on home visits. Be aware of or suspect abuse as a contributory factor to or cause of the symptoms or signs of violence or aggression in children. Abuse may also coexist with violence or aggression. See the NICE guideline on child maltreatment for clinical features that may be associated with maltreatment. This section has

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

118. Diabetic foot problems: prevention and management

to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 14 of 49Orthopaedic surgery. Biomechanics and orthoses. Interventional radiology. Casting. Wound care. 1.2.4 The multidisciplinary foot care service should have access to rehabilitation services, plastic surgery, psychological services and nutritional services. 1.2.5 Healthcare professionals may need to discuss, agree and make special arrangements for disabled people and people who are housebound or living in care (...) settings, to ensure equality of access to foot care assessments and treatments for people with diabetes. 1.2.6 T ake into account any disabilities, including visual impairment, when planning and delivering care for people with diabetes. 1.3 Assessing the risk of developing a diabetic foot problem F Frequency of assessments requency of assessments 1.3.1 For children with diabetes who are under 12 years, give them, and their family members or carers (as appropriate), basic foot care advice. 1.3.2

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

119. Depression in adults with chronic physical health problem: recognition and management

care on physical health outcomes for patients with moderate to severe depression and a chronic physical health problem 39 4.6 The effectiveness of physical rehabilitation programmes for patients with a chronic physical health problem and depression 40 4.7 The efficacy of counselling compared with low-intensity cognitive and behavioural interventions and treatment as usual in the treatment of depression in patients with a chronic physical health problem 41 5 Other versions of this guideline 43 (...) on the identification, treatment and management of depression in adults aged 18 years and older who also have a chronic physical health problem (such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a musculoskeletal, respiratory or neurological disorder). Depression is a broad and heterogeneous diagnosis. Central to it is depressed mood and/or loss of pleasure in most activities. A chronic physical health problem can both cause and exacerbate depression: pain, functional impairment and disability associated with chronic

2009 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

120. Metastatic spinal cord compression in adults: diagnosis and management

. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 39Contents Contents Overview 5 Who is it for? 5 Introduction 6 Patient-centred care 7 Key priorities for implementation 8 1 Guidance 10 1.1 Service configuration and urgency of treatment 10 1.2 The patient's experience of MSCC 12 1.3 Early detection 13 1.4 Imaging 14 1.5 Treatment of spinal metastases and MSCC 16 1.6 Supportive care and rehabilitation 23 2 Notes on the scope of the guidance 27 3 (...) -of-rights). Page 4 of 39This guideline is the basis of QS56. This guideline should be read in conjunction with IPG12, TA265 and QS155. Ov Overview erview This guideline covers detecting and managing metastatic spinal cord compression in adults with cancer that has spread to the spine. It aims to improve quality of life by promoting early detection and management, and reducing spinal cord damage and disability. NICE has also produced guidance on denosumab for the prevention of skeletal-related events

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country