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641. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition) ? ? ? ? Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine ? ? ? Endorsed by: Faculty?of?Pain?Medicine,?Royal?College?of? Anaesthetists,?United?Kingdom?? Royal?College?of?Anaesthetists,? United?Kingdom?? Australian?Pain?Society? Australasian?Faculty?of?Rehabilitation?Medicine? College?of?Anaesthesiologists,?? Academy?of?Medicine,?Malaysia? College (...) . It was approved by the NHMRC and published by the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) and its Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM) in 2005. It was also endorsed by a number of major organisations — the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), the Royal College of Anaesthetists (United Kingdom), the Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the Royal Australian and New Zealand

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

642. Guideline for the non-surgical management of hip and knee osteoarthritis

disease burden in terms of disability adjusted life years. Over 6 million Australians (almost one-third of the population) are estimated to have a chronic musculoskeletal disease; chronic musculoskeletal disease represents the main cause of long term pain and physical disability. In Australia, osteoarthritis is self reported by more than 1.4 million people (7.3% of the population 4 ) and is the tenth most commonly managed problem in general practice. 5 This number is set to rise as the elderly (...) population grows. Osteoarthritis exerts a significant burden on the individual and the community through reduction in quality of life, diminished employment capacity and an increase in health care costs. For further details, refer to the Evidence to support the National Action Plan for Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoporosis: Opportunities to improve health-related quality of life and reduce the burden of disease and disability (2004). 6 As such, federal government health policy has

2009 National Health and Medical Research Council

643. 2011 update to NHFA and CSANZ guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of chronic heart failure in Australia

. Supporting patients 16 5.1 Role of the patient 16 5.2 Effective management of CHF 17 6. N o n - p ha r m a c o l o gi c a l management 18 6.1 Identifying ‘high-risk’ patients 18 6.2 Physical activity and rehabilitation 18 6.3 Nutrition 20 6.4 Fluid management 20 6.5 Smoking 21 6.6 Self-management and education 21 6.7 Psychosocial support 21 6.8 Other important issues 21 7. Pharmacological therapy 24 7.1 Prevention of CHF and treatment of asymptomatic LV systolic dysfunction 24 7.2 Treatment (...) /replacement Catheter/Surgical correction Pericardial drainage/ resection Revascularisation * The choice of imaging modality will vary according to local availability and institutional expertise.Guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of chronic heart failure in Australia. Updated October 2011 16 5. Supporting patients CHF is a disabling and deadly condition that directly affects more than 300,000 Australians at any one time. Regardless of patients’ clinical status (around one-third

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

644. COVID-19: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

that a preparedness plan will consider other counter measures. Recommended PPE for primary, outpatient and community care by setting, NHS and independent sector For healthcare professionals working in primary, outpatient and community care, the following PPE guidelines apply. This might be relevant to those working in the following services: all community mental health teams, including children & young people, adults, older adults, perinatal, rehab and forensic mental health teams crisis resolution and home (...) with intellectual disabilities specialist eating disorder units mother and baby units ECT suites PICU all secure inpatient wards prison healthcare. *We have updated this section of our webpage in light of changes Public Health England have made to their PPE tables in order to ensure information for members is as clear as possible. Additional considerations This table covers situations where staff are providing direct patient/resident care assessing an individual that is NOT currently a possible or confirmed

2020 Royal College of Psychiatrists

645. Management of Multiple Sclerosis

Appendix 5 New NMOSD Diagnostic Criteria for Adult 97 Patients 2013 MS Disease Modifier Phenotypes Appendix 6 Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale 99 (EDSS) for Neurologic Assessment Appendix 7 Neuroimaging Features in MS 100 Appendix 8 Bladder Diary 103 Appendix 9 Drug Dosages and Side Effects in MS 104 List of Abbreviations 120 Acknowledgement 122 Disclosure Statement 122 Source of Funding 122Management of Multiple Sclerosis Level I II -1 II-2 II-3 III Study design Evidence from at least one (...) . Medical officers and general practitioners d. Allied health professionals e. Pharmacists f. Students (medical postgraduates and undergraduates, and allied health students) g. Patients and carers HEALTHCARE SETTINGS Outpatient, inpatient and community settingsManagement of Multiple Sclerosis v GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT GROUP Chairperson Dr. Shanthi Viswanathan Consultant Neurologist Hospital Kuala Lumpur Members (alphabetical order) Dr . Akmal Hafizah Zamli Rehabilitation Physician Hospital Sg. Buloh Dr

2015 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

646. Guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of chronic heart failure (updated October 2011)

5.2 Effective management of CHF 17 6. N o n - p ha r m a c o l o gi c a l management 18 6.1 Identifying ‘high-risk’ patients 18 6.2 Physical activity and rehabilitation 18 6.3 Nutrition 20 6.4 Fluid management 20 6.5 Smoking 21 6.6 Self-management and education 21 6.7 Psychosocial support 21 6.8 Other important issues 21 7. Pharmacological therapy 24 7.1 Prevention of CHF and treatment of asymptomatic LV systolic dysfunction 24 7.2 Treatment of symptomatic systolic CHF 26 7.3 Outpatient treatment (...) /replacement Catheter/Surgical correction Pericardial drainage/ resection Revascularisation * The choice of imaging modality will vary according to local availability and institutional expertise.Guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of chronic heart failure in Australia. Updated October 2011 16 5. Supporting patients CHF is a disabling and deadly condition that directly affects more than 300,000 Australians at any one time. Regardless of patients’ clinical status (around one-third

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

647. Prevention, identification and management of foot complications in diabetes

Care Settings Assessing and de? ning risk EBR 1 Assess all people with diabetes and stratify their risk of developing foot complications. 1 Grade C p19 EO 1 Any suitably trained healthcare professional may perform the risk assessment. EO p19 EBR 2 Assess risk strati? cation by inquiring about previous foot ulceration and amputation, visually inspecting the feet for structural abnormalities and ulceration, assessing for neuropathy using either the Neuropathy Disability Score or a 10g mono? lament (...) of lower extremity amputations in Australia to be $A26,700 per person. Estimated costs for other countries were $A24,660 for Canada; $A46,064 for France; $A31,809 for Germany; $A14,650 for Italy; and $A21,287 for Spain. 56 Other direct and indirect economic costs of foot complications, not included in the above data, include the costs of rehabilitation, purchase and ? tting of orthotics/prostheses, and time lost from work. A4 Cost Effectiveness of Assessment, Prevention and Management of Foot

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

648. Occupational Therapy for Adults Undergoing Total Hip Replacement

although the role of occupational therapy is well established and recognised (British Orthopaedic Association 2006), there are rapid changes in the face of practice – not only in the timings of interventions but in the age and range of people needing rehabilitation. Occupational therapists are treating more people of working age who have had hip replacements as well as continuing to treat their more traditional caseload of older patients. They seem to be seeing people earlier, and patients are being (...) . The seven recommendation categories re?ect the potential outcomes for service users following total hip replacement and occupational therapy intervention, and are presented in the order of prioritisation identi?ed from service user consultation. Maximised functional independence 1. It is recommended that the occupational therapy assessment is comprehensive and considers factors which may affect individual needs, goals, recovery and rehabilitation, including co-morbidities, trauma history, personal

2012 Publication 1554

649. Speech and Language Delay and Disorders in Children Age 5 and Younger: Screening

distinguishing between the two. Second, although the majority of school-aged children with language disorders present with language delays as toddlers, some children outgrow their language delay. Information about the prevalence of speech and language delays and disorders in young children in the United States is limited. In 2007, about 2.6% of children ages 3 to 5 years received services for speech and language disabilities under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In 1 population-based (...) study in 8-year-olds in Utah, the prevalence of children with communication disorders (speech or language) on the basis of special education or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision , classifications was 63.4 cases per 1,000 children. The prevalence of isolated communication disorders (i.e., children without a concomitant diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability) was 59.1 cases per 1,000 children. Information on the natural history of speech and language

2015 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

650. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening

curvature progression in adulthood. Severe spinal curvature may be associated with adverse long-term health outcomes (eg, pulmonary disorders, disability, back pain, psychological effects, cosmetic issues, and reduced quality of life). , Therefore, early identification and effective treatment of mild scoliosis could slow or stop curvature progression before skeletal maturity, thereby improving long-term outcomes in adulthood. Detection The USPSTF found adequate evidence that currently available (...) with spinal curvatures greater than 100°; however, curvatures of that severity are rare. Back pain is more common, but its effect on functioning or disability is unclear. Current evidence suggests that the presence of back pain does not necessarily correlate with the degree of spinal curvature in adulthood. Adults with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis may have poor self-reported health, appearance, and social interactions. Mortality is similar to that among unaffected adults. Potential Harms Evidence

2018 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

651. Intermediate care - Hospital at Home in COPD

to the patient and the exacerbation. Assessment proformas/protocols/integrated care pathways Several studies have shown that integrated care pathways (ICPs) can improve the delivery of care. This has been demonstrated by RCTs in the areas of inpatient asthma management, pneumonia, stroke rehabilitation, heart failure and orthopaedic surgery. 8–13 Given the stereotyped nature of assessment and treatment in exacerbations of COPD, it is a potential area in which to use an ICP, but there have been no trials (...) . [Grade B] What other treatments can be offered? HaH interventions provide the opportunity to offer additional ancillary treatments to the patient. Although components of care such as smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation were not offered as part of the studies forming the evidence base of HaH for COPD, these form part of basic COPD care delivery. Additional support for patients and carers may be provided by home help and occupational therapy services. Positioning to improve the mechanics

2007 British Thoracic Society

652. Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care

unit care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E45 4.2 Components of acute inpatient care . . . . . . . . . . . E48 5 5: : S St tr ro ok ke e r re eh ha ab bi il li it ta at ti io on n a an nd d c co om mm mu un ni it ty y r re ei in nt te eg gr ra at ti io on n E52 5.1 Initial stroke rehabilitation assessment . . . . . . . . . E52 5.2 Provision of inpatient stroke rehabilitation . . . . . . E54 5.3 Components of inpatient stroke rehabilitation . . E56 5.4 Outpatient (...) and community-based rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58 5.5 Follow-up and community reintegration . . . . . . . . E61 6 6: : S Se el le ec ct te ed d t to op pi ic cs s i in n s st tr ro ok ke e m ma an na ag ge em me en nt t E63 6.1 Dysphagia assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63 6.2 Identification and management of post-stroke depression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65 6.3 Vascular cognitive impairment

2009 CPG Infobase

653. Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 4.7 Acute Aspirin Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 4.8 Management of Subarachnoid and Intracerebral Hemorrhage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Section 5 | Stroke Rehabilitation and Community Reintegration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 5.1 Initial Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 5.2 Provision of Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation (...) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 5.3 Components of Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 5.4 Identi?cation and Management of Post-Stroke Depression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 5.5 Shoulder Pain Assessment and Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 5.6 Community-Based Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Section 6 | Follow-up and Community Reintegration After Stroke

2008 CPG Infobase

654. Workplace interventions for people with common mental health problems

problems as those that:- • occur most frequently and are more prevalent; • are mostly successfully treated in primary rather than secondary care settings; • are least disabling in terms of stigmatising attitudes and discriminatory behaviour. We focused broadly on themes of prevention, retention and rehabilitation. Our main research questions were:- • What is the evidence for preventative programmes at work and what are the conditions under which they are most effective? • For those employees identified (...) as at risk, what interventions most effectively enable them to remain at work? • For those employees who have had periods of mental ill health related sickness, what interventions most effectively support their rehabilitation and return to work? We found support for the following conclusions. • Amongst employees who have not manifested with common mental health problems or who are not at high risk, there is moderate evidence from five research papers to suggest that a range of stress management

2005 British Occupational Health Research Foundation

655. Cardiac - implantable cardioverter defibrillator

of the shocks administered by ICDs (up to 40 Joules) are much lower than those employed with external de?brillators (100 – 360J). Personnel in contact with the patient when an ICD discharges will not be harmed, and no special precautions are necessary when handling or treating such patients. Chest compression and ventilation can be carried out as normal and protective examination gloves worn as usual. Placing a ring magnet over the ICD generator can temporarily disable the shock capability of an ICD (...) . The magnet does not disable the pacing capability for treating bradycardia. The magnet may be kept in position with adhesive tape if required. Removing the magnet returns the ICD to the status present before application. The ECG rhythm should be monitored at all times when the device is disabled. An ICD should only be disabled when the rhythm for which shocks are being delivered has been recorded. If that rhythm is VT or VF, external cardioversion/de?brillation must be available. With some models

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

657. Guidelines for the Acute Treatment of Cerebral Edema in Neurocritical Care Patients

, but outcomes are often influ - enced by multiple factors that may be beyond the aware- ness or control of the treating team (e.g., comorbidities, associated injuries, rehabilitation availability, etc.). Cor- ticosteroids appear to be helpful in reducing cerebral edema in patients with bacterial meningitis, but not ICH. Differences in therapeutic response and safety may exist between HTS and mannitol. The use of these agents in these critical clinical situations merits close monitoring for adverse effects (...) , evaluate the best duration of therapy, standardize and report basic care protocols, and consider the impact of all pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions on designated out- comes. Finally, while the goal of all interventions in the management of neurological injuries is to improve sur- vival and minimize disability, it must be acknowledged that a single intervention to address a specific physi - ological variable may have limited impact on the multi- ple factors that contribute to both

2020 Neurocritical Care Society

658. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) and Related Disorders of Chronic Orthostatic Intolerance Full Text available with Trip Pro

rehabilitation program. 7.3 Pharmacological management of POTS If patients have disabling symptoms at the time of presentation and/or continue to experience symptoms after implementation of nonpharmacologic strategies, then pharmacologic treatments should be considered. These treatments might also be helpful to support patients, especially during the early stages of the exercise program. Drug therapy is aimed at ameliorating symptoms by improving central blood volume, enhancing vasoconstriction, and reducing (...) . 2011; 21 : 69-72 , Sheldon R.S. Grubb B.P. Olshansky B. et al. 2015 Heart Rhythm Society expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of postural tachycardia syndrome, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, and vasovagal syncope. Heart Rhythm. 2015; 12 : e41-e63 Anecdotally, most patients present with POTS between 13 to 40 years, and more than 90% are female. If not adequately treated, POTS can become a debilitating disorder that can lead to impairment in quality of life and disability, Shaw

2020 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

659. Infection Prevention and Control guidance for Long-Term Care Facilities in the context of COVID-19

reports for COVID-19. COVID-19 is an acute respiratory illness caused by a novel human coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2, called COVID-19 virus), which causes higher mortality in people aged =60 years and in people with underlying medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes and cancer. Long-term care facilities (LTCFs), such as nursing homes and rehabilitative centers, are facilities that care for people who suffer from physical or mental disability, some of who

2020 WHO Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Pandemic

660. Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care: Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

anuloplasty IV Intravenous K-ODI Korean Oswestry Disability Index K-SF-36 Korean Short Form-36 LBP Low back pain MDR Multidisciplinary rehabilitation MDT Mechanical diagnosis and therapy MMPI Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory MPQ McGill Pain Questionnaire MR Magnetic resonance MRI Magnetic resonance imaging MSPQ Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire MVK Modified Von Korff Scale NPRS Numeric Pain Rating Scale NRS Numerical rating scale NSAIDS Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ODI Oswestry (...) Society of Spine Radiology (ASSR) Medical & Psychological Treatment Section Section Chair: Christopher M. Bono, MD Authors: Paul Dougherty, DC Gazanfar Rahmathulla, MD, MBBS Christopher K. Taleghani, MD Terry Trammell, MD Randall P. Brewer, MD; Stakeholder Representative, American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Ravi Prasad, PhD; Stakeholder Representative, American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Contributor: John P. Birkedal, MD Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Section Section Chair: Charles

2020 American Academy of Pain Medicine

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