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41. Guidelines for the Evaluation of Dementia and Age-Related Cognitive Change

cognitive change have a solid foundation in clinical psychology. In addition, they are encouraged to obtain fundamental education, training, and supervised experience in geropsychology, neuropsy- chology, rehabilitation psychology, pharmacology, neuro- pathology, and psychopathology. II. General Guidelines: Ethical Considerations Guideline 3. Psychologists are aware of the special issues surrounding informed consent in cognitively compromised populations. Rationale. Psychologists recognize the special (...) and treatment planning purposes. Application. In order to accurately diagnose con- ditions that are associated with cognitive decline and func- tional disability, psychologists conduct a clinical interview with the individual and obtain corroboration from knowledge- able informants whenever possible. Key information obtained during the interview includes the following: ? the onset and course of changes in cognitive func- tioning, ? pre-existing disabilities, ? educational and cultural background that could

2012 American Psychological Association

42. APA Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice and Organizational Change for Psychologists

. BAPPI has determined that the wealth of scholarship specific to race/ethnicity as well as the scholarship focused on other identity groups warrants splitting the 2002 Multicultural Guidelines into two sets of guidelines going forward: one focused on “pan” or “umbrella” multicultural guidelines that captures universal concepts based on the scholarly literature across a broad cross-section of identity groups (e.g., age, disability, race, ethnicity, gender, religion/spirituality, sexual orientation (...) identity, social class, ability/disability status, national origin, immigration status, and historical as well as ongoing experiences of marginalization, among other variables (Comas-Díaz, 2012; Crenshaw, 1989; Greene, 2013; Hays, 2016; Olkin, 2002; Roysircar- Sodowsky & Maestas, 2000). 17 Similarly, group identity or social identity, which refers to one’s affiliation with and feelings about one’s connection with other members of a particular sociocultural group as well as having an awareness of group

2002 American Psychological Association

43. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

Privileges, 1991) and draw on the issues highlighted in an additional APA document regarding practicing psychology in hospitals from that same time period (APA Practice Director- ate, 1998). There are a wide variety of systems for health care delivery, including, but not limited to, primary care and inte- grative care facilities, tertiary care hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, outpatient surgery centers, and sub- stance abuse treatment centers. Similarly, there are a wide variety (...) of Other Health Care Professionals Rationale. The successful development, integra- tion, and delivery of psychological services in health care delivery systems depends upon psychologists’ abilities, willingness, and opportunities to explain how they might contribute to effective prevention, diagnosis, consultation, treatment, rehabilitation, and/or end-of-life care. Psychol- ogists aim to enhance patient participation in decision making about, satisfaction with, and adherence to recom- mended care

2013 American Psychological Association

44. Guidelines for Psychological Evaluations in Child Protection Matters

be provided to the court, state agencies, or other parties (APA Ethics Code, Standard 2.01(f)). For example, in cases involving physical disability, such as hearing impairments, orthopedic handicaps, etc., psychol- 21 January 2013 ? American Psychologistogists strive to seek consultation from experts in these areas. This need for consultation may also apply to other aspects of human diversity, such as, but not limited to, ethnic minority status, sexual orientation, and socioeco- nomic status (Condie, 2003 (...) , including those attributes, skills, and abilities most relevant to abuse and/or neglect concerns; (b) the psychological functioning and developmental needs of the child, particularly with regard to vulnera- bilities and special needs, including any disabilities, of the child as well as the strength of the child’s attachment to the parent(s) and the possible detrimental effects of separation from the parent(s); (c) the current and poten- tial functional abilities of the parent(s) to meet the needs

2013 American Psychological Association

45. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure companion: bridging guidelines to your practice

of MRA for patients who have had an increased NP level. (5) Correction of any condition, such as systemic hyperten- sion, valvular heart disease, cardiac ischemia, or tachy- cardia and/or atrial ?brillation that might have aggravated or precipitated HF. (6) Treatment of concomitant comorbid conditions. (7) Use of minimal doses of diuretics necessary to maintain euvolemia. (8) Access to HF clinics, cardiac rehabilitation, and self-care management as per any other patient with HF. How Should I Manage (...) in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. N Engl J Med 2011;364: 1607-16. 45. JonesRH,VelazquezEJ,MichlerRE,etal.Coronarybypasssurgerywith or without surgical ventricular reconstruction. N Engl J Med 2009;360: 1705-17. 46. Martocchia A, Frugoni P, Indiano I, et al. Screening of frailty in elderly patients with disability by the means of Marigliano-Cacciafesta poly- pathology scale (MCPS) and Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) scales. Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2013;56:339-42. 47. Chan M, Tsuyuki R

2016 CPG Infobase

46. Clinical practice guidelines and principles of care for people with dementia

] People with dementia describe the condition as disabling, challenging, life changing and stressful.[2] The impact of dementia on carers is significant and caring for a person with dementia may lead to poor health, depression and social isolation.[3] Approximately nine per cent of Australians aged 65 and over have a diagnosis of dementia; in people aged 85 years and older this figure rises to 30 per cent.[4] As Australia’s population ages, the number of people with dementia is expected to increase (...) of people with dysphasia or an intellectual disability. 11 PP Hospitals should implement strategies to maximise independence and minimise the risk of harm for patients with dementia as identified by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. 12 PP Organisations in primary, secondary and tertiary care settings should consider the needs of people with dementia when designing health and aged care services and facilities. In particular, services should be structured to complement

2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

47. Transition from children's to adults' services for young people using health or social care services

: support the young person for the time defined in relevant legislation, or a minimum of 6 months before and after transfer (the exact length of time should be negotiated with the young person) hand over their responsibilities as named worker to someone in adults' services, if they are based in children's services. 1.2.10 For disabled young people in education, the named worker should liaise with education practitioners to ensure comprehensive student-focused transition planning is provided. This should (...) include, for example, written information, computer-based reading programmes, audio or braille formats for disabled young people) describe the transition process describe what support is available before and after transfer describe where they can get advice about benefits and what financial support they are entitled to. Support from the named work Support from the named worker er 1.3.5 Consider finding ways to help the young person become familiar with adults' Transition from children’s to adults

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

48. Management of chronic heart failure

the processes described SIGN 50: a guideline developer’s handbook, 2015 edition (www.sign.ac.uk/guidelines/fulltext/50/ index.html). More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.nice.org.uk/ accreditation Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) is committed to equality and diversity and assesses all its publications for likely impact on the six equality groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion/belief and sexual orientation. SIGN guidelines are produced using a standard methodology (...) and a checklist of information for patients. The management of specific aetiologies of HF such as inherited (genetic) cardiac conditions, has not been covered in this guideline. Other relevant SIGN guidelines on the management of acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmias and stable angina, primary prevention of coronary heart disease and cardiac rehabilitation are available from www.sign.ac.uk 1.2.2 DEFINITIONS Heart failure is a clinical syndrome of symptoms (eg breathlessness, fatigue) and signs (eg oedema

2016 SIGN

49. Oral health for adults in care homes

they may be home to around 30,000 younger adults with learning disabilities (Emerson et al. 2013 [2] ). The Alzheimer's Society estimates 80% of residents have dementia or severe memory problems (Low expectations). Research with adults in care homes with moderate to severe dementia has reported poor oral health (Preston 2006 [3] ). A 2012 British Dental Association survey (Dentistry in care homes research – UK) found inconsistent oral health care in care homes. It found many residents had oral health (...) , Hatton C, Robertson J et al. (2013) People with learning disabilities in England 2012. Learning Disabilities Observatory: Lancaster. [3] Preston A (2006) The oral health of individuals with dementia in nursing homes. Gerodontology 23 (2): 99–105 Oral health for adults in care homes (NG48) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 15 of 37The committee The committee's discussion 's discussion Evidence statement

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

50. Acute coronary syndrome

50: a guideline developer’s handbook, 2015 edition (www.sign.ac.uk/guidelines/fulltext/50/ index.html). More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.nice.org.uk/ accreditation Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) is committed to equality and diversity and assesses all its publications for likely impact on the six equality groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion/belief and sexual orientation. SIGN guidelines are produced using a standard methodology that has been

2016 SIGN

52. Stroke, Diagnosis and Initial Treatment of Ischemic Stroke

for endorsement of guidelines. The following ICSI endorsement and conclusions are solely the consensus of the ICSI Diagnosis and Initial Treatment of Ischemic Stroke Work Group using the ICSI Endorsement Process. Introduction Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of serious long-term disability (Mozzafarian, 2015; Kochanek, 2014). Annually, approximately 800,000 people in the United States have a stroke, and 130,000 die (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (...) stroke symptoms. (Class I; LOE A) Agree 2. For patients with mild but disabling stroke symptoms, IV alteplase is indicated within 3 h from symptom onset of ischemic stroke. There should be no exclusion for patients with mild but nonetheless disabling stroke symptoms, in the opinion of the treating physician, from treatment with IV alteplase because there is proven clinical benefit for those patients. (Class I; LOE B-R) Agree 3–4.5 h* 1. IV alteplase (0.9 mg/kg, maximum dose 90 mg over 60 min

2019 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

53. Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure: Risk Assessment, Management, and Clinical Trajectory

in HF decompensation and as independent targets for intervention. For example, diabetes mellitus and pulmo- nary disease are each present in 30% to 40% of patients hospitalized with HF and play a role in disease severity and risk for decompensation (82). Kidney dysfunction can pre- cipitate congestion and can also limit initiation of GDMT. FrailtyisanothercommoncomorbidityinHF,particularly for the elderly (83,84), and itsassociation withhealth,functional status, and late-life disability (...) bypass surgery. Exercise program/cardiac rehabilitation. Behavioral Weight Loss Interventions to Prevent Obesity-Related Morbidity and Mortality in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Malnutrition Assess for protein calorie malnutrition. Referral to dietician. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient Frailty, deconditioning Assess for frailty, consider physical therapy and/or referral for rehabilitation

2019 American College of Cardiology

54. Canadian guideline for Parkinson disease

a trial of dopamine replacement therapy to help with diagnosis. n Impulse control disorders can develop on dopami- nergic therapy at any stage in the disease but are more common in patients on dopamine agonists. n Deep brain stimulation and gel infusion are now routinely used to manage motor symptoms. n Rehabilitation therapists experienced with Parkinson disease can help newly diagnosed patients, and others through all stages. VISUAL SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE CANADIAN GUIDELINE (...) with diagnosis. n Impulse control disorders can develop on dopami- nergic therapy at any stage in the disease but are more common in patients on dopamine agonists. n Deep brain stimulation and gel infusion are now routinely used to manage motor symptoms. n Rehabilitation therapists experienced with Parkinson disease can help newly diagnosed patients, and others through all stages. VISUAL SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE CANADIAN GUIDELINE FOR PARKINSON DISEASE, 2ND ED PARKINSON DISEASE Parkinson-visual-9

2019 CPG Infobase

55. Guidelines on Chronic Coronary Syndromes Full Text available with Trip Pro

test 18 3.1.5.6 Invasive testing 19 3.1.6 Step 6: assess event risk 21 3.1.6.1 Definition of levels of risk 22 3.2 Lifestyle management 23 3.2.1 General management of patients with coronary artery disease 23 3.2.2 Lifestyle modification and control of risk factors 23 3.2.2.1 Smoking 23 3.2.2.2 Diet and alcohol 24 3.2.2.3 Weight management 24 3.2.2.4 Physical activity 24 3.2.2.5 Cardiac rehabilitation 24 3.2.2.6 Psychosocial factors 24 3.2.2.7 Environmental factors 25 3.2.2.8 Sexual activity 25

2019 European Society of Cardiology

56. Canadian Urological Association guideline for the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

Canadian’s living with SB, which is the leading cause of disabling birth defect within the country. 11 12,14 In Canada, 86 000 people are living with SCI and 4300 new cases of SCI occur each year. 15 These numbers are pro- jected to increase to 121 000 individuals, with 5800 new cases a year by 2030. 15 Trauma is the most frequent cause of SCI in Canada and most commonly affects men in the 20–29-year age group. 15 Compared to international etiol- ogy, where the majority of SCI is the result of motor (...) , and 70–84% in SCI. 19 A recent Canadian study looking at the impact of bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction in 51 community-dwelling individuals with traumatic SCI reported that 59% of these individuals had bladder dysfunction. 20 Neurological conditions often result in physical disability requiring the need for assistance with activities of daily liv- ing, including assistance with or requiring devices to manage NLUTD. Giesbrecht et al reported that of Canadians living at home with a physical

2019 Canadian Urological Association

58. Integrated care for older people (?ICOPE)?: guidance for person-centred assessment and pathways in primary care

Martin (King’s College London, United Kingdom). Sarah Johnson and Ward Rinehart of Jura Editorial Services were responsible for writing the final text. Many other WHO staff from the regional offices and a range of departments contributed both to specific sections relevant to their areas of work and to the development of the care pathways: Shelly Chadha (WHO Department of Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention), Neerja Chowdhary (WHO Department of Mental (...) Health and Substance Abuse), Tarun Dua (WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse), Maria De Las Nieves Garcia Casal (WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development), Zee A Han (WHO Department of Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention), Dena Javadi (WHO Department of Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research), Silvio Paolo Mariotti (WHO Department of Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention

2019 World Health Organisation Guidelines

59. Integrated care for older people (?ICOPE)? implementation framework: guidance for systems and services

Toro Polanco (WHO Department of Services Organization and Clinical Interventions). Thanks to Professor Michael Kidd and Assistant Professor Michelle Nelson, both from the University of Toronto, for providing feedback on earlier versions of the framework. The department would like to thank the ICOPE steering group (in alphabetical order): Shelly Chadha and Alarcos Cieza (WHO Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention), Tarun Dua (WHO Department (...) of Mental Health and Substance Abuse), Maria De Las Nieves Garcia Casal (WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development), Manfred Huber (WHO Regional Office for Europe), Ramez Mahaini (WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean), Silvio Paolo Mariotti (WHO Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention), Alana Margaret Officer (WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course), Taiwo Adedemola Oyelade (WHO Regional Office for Africa), Juan Pablo

2019 World Health Organisation Guidelines

60. Management of Dyslipidaemias Full Text available with Trip Pro

in men (490 000 vs. 193 000). Prevention is defined as a co-ordinated set of actions, either at the population or individual level, aimed at eliminating or minimizing the impact of CV diseases and their related disabilities. More patients are surviving their first CVD event and are at high-risk of recurrences. In addition, the prevalence of some risk factors, notably diabetes (DM) and obesity, is increasing. The importance of ASCVD prevention remains undisputed and should be delivered at the general

2019 European Society of Cardiology

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