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21. Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery

of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) 3 ; (4) Sensorimotor Impairments and Activities (treatment/interventions), focused on the activity level of the ICF; and (5) Transitions in Care and Community Rehabilitation, focused primarily on the participation level of the ICF. Published guidelines are, by their very nature, a reflection of clinical practice at a particular point in time and the evidence base available. As new information becomes available, best practice can (...) suggests that stroke survi- vors who qualify for IRF services should receive this care in preference to SNF-based care. Rehabilitation Interventions in the Inpatient Hospital Setting There is strong evidence that organized, interprofessional stroke care not only reduces mortality rates and the likelihood of insti- tutional care and long-term disability but also enhances recov- ery and increases independence in ADLs. 47–50 Although many small, randomized, clinical trials have studied interventions

2016 American Academy of Neurology

22. Rehabilitation of Lower Limb Amputation

facilitates discussions sensitive to gender, culture, and ethnic differences. The information that patients are given about treatment and care should be culturally appropriate and also available to people with limited literacy skills. It should also be accessible to people with additional needs such as physical, sensory, or learning disabilities. Family involvement should be considered, if appropriate. This CPG is designed to assist providers in managing or co-managing patients in rehabilitation for LLA (...) Rehabilitation of Lower Limb Amputation VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR REHABILITATION OF INDIVIDUALS WITH LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard of care and should

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

23. BSRM Standards for Rehabilitation Services Mapped on to the National Service Framework for Long-Term Conditions

for people with more complex needs and therefore recommends that rehabilitation services are planned and delivered through co-ordinated networks in which specialist neuro- rehabilitation services work both in hospital and the community to support local rehabilitation and care support teams. The NSF recognises the need for ‘complex specialised services’ to support people with profound and complex disability, and the recently published Warner Report on specialised commissioning recommends that these should (...) be planned over a suitable geographical area (approximately 1-3 million population in this case), and therefore require collaborative commissioning arrangements. Standards: S1 Disabled people should have access to all appropriate rehabilitation services including: • Specialist in-patient neuro-rehabilitation services led by a consultant trained and accredited in Rehabilitation Medicine (RM) (Level 3 competencies in neurological rehabilitation - as will be defined in the 2010 version of the RM curriculum

2009 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

24. Community-based rehabilitation guidelines

Community-based rehabilitation guidelines WHO | Community-based rehabilitation guidelines WHO Regional websites Access Disability Menu Community-based rehabilitation guidelines Recommendations to develop guidelines on community-based rehabilitation (CBR) were made during the International Consultation to Review Community-based Rehabilitation which was held in Helsinki, Finland in 2003. WHO; the International Labour Organization; the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural (...) Organization; and the International Disability and Development Consortium – notably CBM, Handicap International, the Italian Association Amici di Raoul Follereau, Light for the World, the Norwegian Association of Disabled and Sightsavers – have worked closely together to develop the Community-based rehabilitation guidelines . More than 180 individuals and representatives of nearly 300 organizations, mostly from low-income and middle-income countries around the world, have been involved in their development

2010 World Health Organisation Guidelines

25. Aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements

Aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 Comprehensive supplement to the Australian Aphasia Rehabilitation Pathway www.aphasiapathway.com.au 2 Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 ComprehensivesupplementtotheAustralianAphasiaRehabilitationPathway Contents :: PART 1 - INTRODUCTION 3 DEVELOPMENT OF THE BEST PRACTICE STATEMENTS 3 UNDERSTANDING THE PRESENTATION OF THE STATEMENTS 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 PART 2 - APHASIA (...) REHABILITATION BEST PRACTICE STATEMENTS 7 SECTION 1 :: RECEIVING THE RIGHT REFERRALS 7 SECTION 2 :: OPTIMISING INITIAL CONTACT 10 SECTION 3 :: SETTING GOALS AND MEASURING OUTCOMES 13 SECTION 4 :: ASSESSING 16 SECTION 5 :: PROVIDING INTERVENTION 18 SECTION 6 :: ENHANCING THE COMMUNICATIVE ENVIRONMENT 24 SECTION 7 :: ENHANCING PERSONAL FACTORS 26 SECTION 8 :: PLANNING FOR TRANSITIONS 35 PART 3 - APPENDICES 38 APPENDIX 1 :: NHMRC LEVELS OF EVIDENCE 38 APPENDIX 2 :: ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS 41 APPENDIX 3

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

26. Common principles of rehabilitation for adults with hearing- and/or balance-related problems in routine audiology

improvement of the client’s activity, participation, and quality of life (Boothroyd, 2007). Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as an intervention framework directs clinicians towards using a functional approach to audiological rehabilitation. The major goal for rehabilitation is to improve quality of life through changes in behaviour. The approach to rehabilitation should therefore be based on identifying individual needs, setting specific goals, making shared (...) , financial costs, degree of disability, nature of the intervention, and other people’s experiences, recommendations and support) (Laplante-Lévesque et al., 2010b). Practice Guidance British Society of Audiology Principles of routine adult rehabilitation 2012 © BSA 2012 7 ? Supporting self-management: A client-centred approach can help the client to develop effective ways to help themselves. Supportive encouragement to reflect on current strategies can help to highlight both positive and negative aspects

2012 British Society of Audiology

27. Brain injury rehabilitation in adults

Brain injury rehabilitation in adults SIGN 130 • Brain injury rehabilitation in adults A national clinical guideline March 2013 Evidence Help us to improve SIGN guidelines - click here to complete our survey KEY TO EVIDENCE STATEMENTS AND GRADES OF RECOMMENDATIONS LEVELS OF EVIDENCE 1 ++ High quality meta-analyses, systematic reviews of RCTs, or RCTs with a very low risk of bias 1 + Well conducted meta-analyses, systematic reviews, or RCTs with a low risk of bias 1 - Meta-analyses, systematic (...) /fulltext/50/index. html). More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.evidence.nhs.uk Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) is committed to equality and diversity and assesses all its publications for likely impact on the six equality groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion/belief and sexual orientation. SIGN guidelines are produced using a standard methodology that has been equality impact assessed to ensure that these equality aims are addressed in every guideline

2013 SIGN

28. Management of patients with stroke: rehabilitation, prevention and management of complications, and discharge planning

to rehabilitation is a cyclical process: ? assessment: patients’ needs are identified and quantified ? goal setting: goals are defined for improvement (long/medium/short term) ? intervention: to assist in the achievement of the goals ? re-assessment: progress is assessed against the agreed goals. Rehabilitation goals can be considered at several levels: ? aims: often long term and referring to the situation after discharge ? objectives: usually multiprofessional at the level of disability ? targets: short term (...) time-limited goals. The process of rehabilitation can be interrupted at any stage by previous disability, co-morbidities and complications of the stroke itself. 1.1.5 TERMINOLOGy ‘Disability’ and ‘handicap’ have been replaced with the new terms ‘activity limitations’ and ‘participation restrictions’, respectively. The above terms are used interchangeably in this document. 1.2 ReMit of the GUiDeline 1.2.1 OVERALL ObJECTIVES The aim of this national guideline is to assist individual clinicians

2010 SIGN

29. AHA/ASA Guidelines for Adult Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery

, in which reference is made to other published guidelines (eg, hypertension); (3) Assessment, focused on the body function/structure level of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health ( ICF ) ; (4) Sensorimotor Impairments and Activities (treatment/interventions), focused on the activity level of the ICF ; and (5) Transitions in Care and Community Rehabilitation, focused primarily on the participation level of the ICF . Published guidelines are, by their very nature (...) in favor of IRF referral suggests that stroke survivors who qualify for IRF services should receive this care in preference to SNF-based care. Rehabilitation Interventions in the Inpatient Hospital Setting There is strong evidence that organized, interprofessional stroke care not only reduces mortality rates and the likelihood of institutional care and long-term disability but also enhances recovery and increases independence in ADLs. Although many small, randomized, clinical trials have studied

2016 American Heart Association

30. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

patients, poor functional outcomes are commonplace. Approximately 44% of individuals aged 18-50 experience moderate disability after stroke, requiring at least some assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) and/or mobility (modified Rankin Scale score >2).[3] Even in patients with so-called “mild” or “improving” stroke, a recent study found that only 28% were discharged to home, 16% required admission to acute rehabilitation facilities, and 11% were admitted to skilled nursing facilities.[4] VA (...) /DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Stroke Rehabilitation July 2019 Page 6 of 170 Disability from stroke can present in a myriad of ways depending on the affected area(s) of the central nervous system. The most common presentations include focal weakness and sensory disturbances, speech and swallowing impairments, vision loss or neglect, cognitive problems with inattention or memory loss, as well as emotional difficulties with mood or anxiety. The early management of stroke

2019 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

31. Stroke in childhood - clinical guideline for diagnosis, management and rehabilitation

Stroke in childhood - clinical guideline for diagnosis, management and rehabilitation Stroke in childhood Clinical guideline for diagnosis, management and rehabilitation May 2017 i Endorsement Association of Ambulance Chief Executives Association of Paediatric Chartered Physiotherapists British Association for Community Child Health British Academy of Childhood Disability British Association of General Paediatrics British Association of Stroke Physicians British Paediatric Neurology Association (...) Consultant Speech and Language Therapist Evelina London Children's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, London Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists representative Dr Anne Gordon (Co-Chair, rehabilitation sub-group) Consultant Occupational Therapist Evelina London Children's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, London British Academy of Childhood Disability representative Dr Caroline Hartley Consultant Community Paediatrician Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, East

2017 Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

32. The Subacute Rehabilitation of Childhood Stroke, Clinical Guideline

with Disabilities PNF Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation rTMS Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation SCD Sickle cell disease VPRS Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation ServiceVictorian Subacute Childhood Stroke Guidelines 6 1. QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE Figure 1. Quick reference guide to key recommendations for the subacute rehabilitation of childhood stroke Frameworrk for providing rehabilitation (Section 4) Involvement of an interdisciplinary team Active partnership with family Criteria for determining (...) and rehabilitation services. Contrary to commonly held views, children do not recover better than adults 1 . While relatively rare (estimated incidence: 1.2–7.9 per 100 000 2–4 ), the economic cost of childhood stroke is substantial 5 . The lifelong individual, family and societal burden of early stroke is likely to be greater than in adults because children surviving stroke face many more years living with disability. A U.S. case control study estimated an average five year medical cost of $110,921 per child

2017 Stroke Foundation - Australia

33. Management of Venous Leg Ulcers: Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum

insufficiency and leg ulcers. Angiology . 1997 ; 48 : 67–69 | | The care of VLUs can consume a significant amount of resources, so that an agreed on “best practice” algorithm can maximize the quality and effectiveness of care while minimizing cost and resource use. x 3 Passman, M.A. Non-medical initiatives to decrease venous ulcer prevalence. J Vasc Surg . 2010 ; 52 : 29S–36S | | | | | Moreover, VLUs are associated with prolonged disability, important socioeconomic impact, and significant psychosocial

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2014 American Venous Forum

34. Distal Symmetrical Polyneuropathy: Definition for Clinical Research

not undergo the separate review process of Muscle & Nerve. This article is a joint report of the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine, the American Academy of Neurology, and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviations: EMG, electromyography; MDNS, Michigan diabetic neurop- athy score; MNSI, Michigan neuropathy screening instrument; NCS, nerve- conductions study/studies; NDS, neuropathy disability score; NIS-LL, neu- ropathyimpairmentscoreinthelowerlimbs;QST (...) Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R) determined that there was a need for a formal case de?nition of polyneuropathy. Because of inconsistency in the literature, no consistent case de?nition exists. The use of a formal case de?nition across future research studies would ensure greater consistency of patient selection. This review de- scribes the development of such a case de?nition for “distal symmetrical polyneuropathy.” This article was prepared and reviewed by the AAEM and did

2005 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

35. WHO Guidelines on Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE)

of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention); Tarun Dua (WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse); Manfred Huber (WHO Regional Office for Europe); Silvio Paolo Mariotti (WHO Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention); Maria Alarcos Moreno Cieza (WHO Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention); Alana Margaret Officer (WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course); Juan (...) in the demographics of populations around the world: the proportion of older people in general populations has increased substantially within a relatively short period of time. Numerous underlying physiological changes occur with increasing age, and for older people the risks of developing chronic disease and care dependency increase. By the age of 60 years, the major burden of disability and death arises from age-related losses in hearing, seeing and moving, and conditions such as dementia, heart disease, stroke

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

36. Guidelines for the management of acute joint bleeds and chronic synovitis in haemophilia

). Physiotherapy Although consensus guidelines recommend physiother- apy following acute haemarthrosis [12], there is a very limited objective evidence base in relation to the opti- mal timing and types of rehabilitation strategies fol- lowing resolution of a joint bleed. Clinical physiotherapy intervention is aimed at symptom con- trol, prevention of bleed recurrence, prevention of joint damage and restoration of full function and activity. Early management strategies are often encap- sulated within (...) pain resolves [7] with empirical reports suggesting initial early bed rest for 1 day and avoidance of weight bearing for up to 4 days [41]. However, in practice, relative rest/protection should continue until all clinical symptoms of haemarthrosis (acute swelling, acute palpable localised tissue warmth, acutely reduced range of joint motion and acute joint pain) have resolved and potentially beyond, taking account of the severity and site of the bleed. Depending upon age, pre-existing disability

2017 United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation

37. Canadian guidelines for controlled pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death-summary report

of Bioethics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada. 13 Division of Paediatric Critical Care Medicine, Western University Children’s Hospital, London, ON, Canada. 14 Division of Critical Care, Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital, St. Petersburg, FL. 15 Information Specialist, Québec, QC, Canada. 16 Division of Pediatric Intensive Care, Janeway Childrens Health and Rehabilitation Centre, St. Johns, NL, Canada. 17 Division of Pediatric Intensive Care, Victoria General Hospital, Victoria, BC

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2017 CPG Infobase

38. Psychiatric reports: preparation and use in cases involving asylum, removal from the UK or immigration detention

to rec- ognise psychological vulnerability. Consideration should be given by the applicant’s legal repre- sentatives as to whether expert evidence (e.g. as to capacity, disability, age or mental health) is required, particularly if there is a dispute over ability to participate in the proceedings (Wilson- Shaw et al, 2012). The Secretary of State for the Home Department (Home Secretary) does not normally seek to adduce expert evidence in asylum claims. The immigration courts may direct (...) for the most vulnerable applicants, such as those with suspected intellectual disability or dementia and those exhibiting pseudo-seizures or dissociation. It is important to exercise the same objectivity as with the applicant, and to be mindful that their friends, housemates or relatives might have their own agenda. The psychiatrist should ensure that the applicant provides informed consent for them to talk to the informant. College Report 199 12 Diagnosis Some diagnoses, such as PTSD or depressive

2016 Royal College of Psychiatrists

39. Cancer Australia Annual Report 2016-17

statements are at Appendix A. Other mandatory information can be found at Appendix B, and covers: › advertising and market research › Australian National Audit Office access › competitive tendering and contracting › consultancies › disability reporting › ecologically sustainable development › exempt contracts › external scrutiny › freedom of information (FOI) › grant programs › purchasing › small business › work health and safety.31 Management & Accountability Corporate governance Strategic and business

2017 Cancer Australia

40. Frailty in Older Adults - Early Identification and Management

for Seniors Clinical Care Management Guideline: 48/6 Model of Care, available at the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council website at: Key Recommendations See . Early identification and management of patients with frailty or vulnerable to frailty provides an opportunity to suggest appropriate preventive and rehabilitative actions (e.g. exercise program, review of diet and nutrition, medication review) to be taken to slow, prevent, or even reverse decline associated with frailty. Use a diligent case (...) meta-analysis found that frailty was associated with increased risk for several negative health outcomes, which are listed in Figure 2. 13 Figure 2: Increased risk of negative outcomes associated with frailty 13 Early identification of patients with frailty or vulnerable to frailty provides an opportunity to suggest appropriate preventive and rehabilitative actions (e.g. exercise program, review of diet and nutrition, medication review) to be taken to slow, prevent, or even reverse decline

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

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