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1. Canadian Stroke Best Practice recommendations: rehabilitation, recovery, and community participation following stroke. Part one: rehabilitation and recovery following stroke; 6th edition update 2019

, and communication) and to identify potential discharge needs. Admission to an interprofessional program should be limited to patients who have more than one type of disability and who require the services of two or more rehabilitation dis- ciplines. Three important factors in?uencing the deci- sion to accept a patient for inpatient rehabilitation include pre-morbid cognition, pre-morbid mobility, and pre-morbid communication. 11 Patients with a single disability can usually bene?t from outpatient or community (...) in additionaltherapy(240%ofstandarddose)wasasso- ciated with signi?cantly greater improvements in meas- ures of upper and lower-limb activity. 19 (iii) Where admission to a stroke rehabilitation unit is not possible, inpatient rehabilitation provided on a general rehabilitation unit is the next best alternative (i.e. where interdisciplinary care is provided to patients disabled by a range of disorders including stroke), where a physiatrist, occupational therapist, physiotherapist, and SLP are available on the unit

2020 CPG Infobase

2. Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement (Full text)

Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement - ScienceDirect JavaScript is disabled on your browser. Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page (...) . Download full text in PDF Download Share Export , 1 January 2020, Pages 1-7 Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement Author links open overlay panel Show more Highlights • Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is grossly under-utilized, despite its' proven benefits. • A recently-updated Cochrane review established interventions to increase use. • These were

2020 CPG Infobase PubMed abstract

3. Clinical practice guideline for the rehabilitation of adults with moderate to severe TBI - section 1: components of the optimal TBI rehabilitation system

integration. (INESSS-ONF, 2015) Note: The target length of stay should be established based on individuals with similar functional status and availability of resources in the community, and take into account other factors such as the Glasgow Coma Score in the first few days after injury, intracranial surgery, the degree of initial disability, the presence of fractures of the upper and lower extremities or pelvis, and the person’s age. C 2.2 Target length of stay for intensive rehabilitation following (...) – Postdischarge Follow-Up and Support D1.2 Postdischarge long-term services (e.g., counselling, provision of information, etc.) should be available, if needed, for the person with traumatic brain injury and his/her family/caregivers, to enable and sustain optimal societal participation while supporting personal choice and facilitating adjustment. (Adapted from NZGG 2007, 9.2, p. 132) D2 – Community Rehabilitation D 2.1 Individuals with ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury should have timely access

2016 CPG Infobase

4. Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: a joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement

Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: a joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement Promoting Patient Utilization of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabili... : Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention ')} You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Your account has been temporarily locked Your account has been (...) can read the full text of this article if you: Institutional members Email to Colleague Colleague's E-mail is Invalid Your Name: (optional) Your Email: Colleague's Email: Separate multiple e-mails with a (;). Message: Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. Send a copy to your email Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Export

2020 CPG Infobase

5. Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Low Back Pain

and disabling low back pain remains a clinical challenge. A number of interventional diagnostic tests and therapies and surgery are available and their use is increasing, but in some cases their utility remains uncertain or controversial. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation has also been proposed as a potentially effective noninvasive intervention for persistent and disabling low back pain . Methods. A multidisciplinary panel was convened by the American Pain Society. Its recommendations were based (...) Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Low Back Pain Interventional Therapies, Surgery, and Interdisciplinary Reh... : Spine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account Registered users can save articles

2009 Publication 1228

6. The Subacute Rehabilitation of Childhood Stroke, Clinical Guideline

with Disabilities PNF Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation rTMS Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation SCD Sickle cell disease VPRS Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation ServiceVictorian Subacute Childhood Stroke Guidelines 6 1. QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE Figure 1. Quick reference guide to key recommendations for the subacute rehabilitation of childhood stroke Frameworrk for providing rehabilitation (Section 4) Involvement of an interdisciplinary team Active partnership with family Criteria for determining (...) and rehabilitation services. Contrary to commonly held views, children do not recover better than adults 1 . While relatively rare (estimated incidence: 1.2–7.9 per 100 000 2–4 ), the economic cost of childhood stroke is substantial 5 . The lifelong individual, family and societal burden of early stroke is likely to be greater than in adults because children surviving stroke face many more years living with disability. A U.S. case control study estimated an average five year medical cost of $110,921 per child

2017 Stroke Foundation - Australia

7. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

patients, poor functional outcomes are commonplace. Approximately 44% of individuals aged 18-50 experience moderate disability after stroke, requiring at least some assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) and/or mobility (modified Rankin Scale score >2).[3] Even in patients with so-called “mild” or “improving” stroke, a recent study found that only 28% were discharged to home, 16% required admission to acute rehabilitation facilities, and 11% were admitted to skilled nursing facilities.[4] VA (...) /DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Stroke Rehabilitation July 2019 Page 6 of 170 Disability from stroke can present in a myriad of ways depending on the affected area(s) of the central nervous system. The most common presentations include focal weakness and sensory disturbances, speech and swallowing impairments, vision loss or neglect, cognitive problems with inattention or memory loss, as well as emotional difficulties with mood or anxiety. The early management of stroke

2019 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

8. Brain injury rehabilitation in adults

Brain injury rehabilitation in adults SIGN 130 • Brain injury rehabilitation in adults A national clinical guideline March 2013 Evidence Help us to improve SIGN guidelines - click here to complete our survey KEY TO EVIDENCE STATEMENTS AND GRADES OF RECOMMENDATIONS LEVELS OF EVIDENCE 1 ++ High quality meta-analyses, systematic reviews of RCTs, or RCTs with a very low risk of bias 1 + Well conducted meta-analyses, systematic reviews, or RCTs with a low risk of bias 1 - Meta-analyses, systematic (...) /fulltext/50/index. html). More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.evidence.nhs.uk Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) is committed to equality and diversity and assesses all its publications for likely impact on the six equality groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion/belief and sexual orientation. SIGN guidelines are produced using a standard methodology that has been equality impact assessed to ensure that these equality aims are addressed in every guideline

2013 SIGN

9. Cardiac rehabilitation

Cardiac rehabilitation SIGN 150 • Cardiac rehabilitation A national clinical guideline July 2017 Evidence www.healthcareimprovementscotland.org Edinburgh Office | Gyle Square |1 South Gyle Crescent | Edinburgh | EH12 9EB Telephone 0131 623 4300 Fax 0131 623 4299 Glasgow Office | Delta House | 50 West Nile Street | Glasgow | G1 2NP Telephone 0141 225 6999 Fax 0141 248 3776 The Healthcare Environment Inspectorate, the Scottish Health Council, the Scottish Health Technologies Group, the Scottish (...) in SIGN 50: a guideline developer’s handbook, 2015 edition (www.sign.ac.uk/sign-50.html More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.nice.org.uk/accreditation Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) is committed to equality and diversity and assesses all its publications for likely impact on the six equality groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion/belief and sexual orientation. SIGN guidelines are produced using a standard methodology that has been equality impact assessed

2017 SIGN

10. Rehabilitation for adults with complex psychosis

Rehabilitation for adults with complex psychosis Rehabilitation for adults with complex psychosis NICE guideline Published: 19 August 2020 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng181 © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Your responsibility Your responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising (...) . Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Rehabilitation for adults with complex psychosis (NG181) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 76Contents Contents Overview 5 Who is it for? 5 Recommendations 6 1.1 Who should be offered

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

11. Rehabilitation in the wake of covid-19 - A phoenix from the ashes

for Patients with Highly Complex Needs ( all ages): D02. London2013 [cited 2014]; Available from: http://www.england.nhs.uk/wp- content/uploads/2014/04/d02-rehab-pat-high-needs-0414.pdf. 26. Specialist neuro-rehabilitation services: providing for patients with complex rehabilitation needs. London: British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine (2010). Updated 2015. 27. Rehabilitation for patients in the acute care pathway following severe disabling illness or injury: BSRM core standards for specialist (...) injury ? Progressive disease Non-neurological ? Complex MSK ? Limb- loss ? Functional ? Other: ? Vascular (stroke) ? Trauma ? Inflammatory ? Anoxic ? Toxic ? Degenerative ? Tumour ? Other: Tertiary ? Major Trauma ? Stroke Unit ? Neurosciences Secondary: ? Acute DGH ? Other Rehab unit Primary care ? Community/home ? Other: ? Assessment only ? Active rehabilitation ? Disability management ? PDOC programme ? Rapid triage and discharge planning ? Other: Rehab Complexity Score (RCS-E v14 – non trauma

2020 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

12. Community-based rehabilitation guidelines

Community-based rehabilitation guidelines WHO | Community-based rehabilitation guidelines WHO Regional websites Access Disability Menu Community-based rehabilitation guidelines Recommendations to develop guidelines on community-based rehabilitation (CBR) were made during the International Consultation to Review Community-based Rehabilitation which was held in Helsinki, Finland in 2003. WHO; the International Labour Organization; the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural (...) Organization; and the International Disability and Development Consortium – notably CBM, Handicap International, the Italian Association Amici di Raoul Follereau, Light for the World, the Norwegian Association of Disabled and Sightsavers – have worked closely together to develop the Community-based rehabilitation guidelines . More than 180 individuals and representatives of nearly 300 organizations, mostly from low-income and middle-income countries around the world, have been involved in their development

2010 World Health Organisation Guidelines

13. BSRM Standards for Rehabilitation Services Mapped on to the National Service Framework for Long-Term Conditions

for people with more complex needs and therefore recommends that rehabilitation services are planned and delivered through co-ordinated networks in which specialist neuro- rehabilitation services work both in hospital and the community to support local rehabilitation and care support teams. The NSF recognises the need for ‘complex specialised services’ to support people with profound and complex disability, and the recently published Warner Report on specialised commissioning recommends that these should (...) be planned over a suitable geographical area (approximately 1-3 million population in this case), and therefore require collaborative commissioning arrangements. Standards: S1 Disabled people should have access to all appropriate rehabilitation services including: • Specialist in-patient neuro-rehabilitation services led by a consultant trained and accredited in Rehabilitation Medicine (RM) (Level 3 competencies in neurological rehabilitation - as will be defined in the 2010 version of the RM curriculum

2009 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

14. Aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements

Aphasia rehabilitation best practice statements Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 Comprehensive supplement to the Australian Aphasia Rehabilitation Pathway www.aphasiapathway.com.au 2 Aphasia Rehabilitation Best Practice Statements 2014 ComprehensivesupplementtotheAustralianAphasiaRehabilitationPathway Contents :: PART 1 - INTRODUCTION 3 DEVELOPMENT OF THE BEST PRACTICE STATEMENTS 3 UNDERSTANDING THE PRESENTATION OF THE STATEMENTS 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 PART 2 - APHASIA (...) REHABILITATION BEST PRACTICE STATEMENTS 7 SECTION 1 :: RECEIVING THE RIGHT REFERRALS 7 SECTION 2 :: OPTIMISING INITIAL CONTACT 10 SECTION 3 :: SETTING GOALS AND MEASURING OUTCOMES 13 SECTION 4 :: ASSESSING 16 SECTION 5 :: PROVIDING INTERVENTION 18 SECTION 6 :: ENHANCING THE COMMUNICATIVE ENVIRONMENT 24 SECTION 7 :: ENHANCING PERSONAL FACTORS 26 SECTION 8 :: PLANNING FOR TRANSITIONS 35 PART 3 - APPENDICES 38 APPENDIX 1 :: NHMRC LEVELS OF EVIDENCE 38 APPENDIX 2 :: ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS 41 APPENDIX 3

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

15. Deprivation of Liberty in the Rehabilitation Setting

Deprivation of Liberty in the Rehabilitation Setting President: Professor Diane Playford | Registered charity number 293196 C/o Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, London NW1 4LE Tel: 01992 638 865 | Fax: 01922 638 674 | admin@bsrm.co.uk | www.bsrm.org.uk Position statement Deprivation of Liberty in the Rehabilitation Setting Definitions The European Court of Human Rights (“the Strasbourg court”) has confirmed that a deprivation of liberty for the purposes of article 5(1) has (...) that is proportionate to the risk and clinical setting and should in part be determined by clinical judgement. When a patient is constrained by the fact of their physical disability, ie, they are immobile, their restriction of movement is not imputed by the state but by their condition. So, for example a patient in MCS or VS, or other profound disability should not be subject to a DoLS, simply because they cannot move around independently or require continuous supervision. For more mobile patients, we also agree

2017 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

16. Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery

of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) 3 ; (4) Sensorimotor Impairments and Activities (treatment/interventions), focused on the activity level of the ICF; and (5) Transitions in Care and Community Rehabilitation, focused primarily on the participation level of the ICF. Published guidelines are, by their very nature, a reflection of clinical practice at a particular point in time and the evidence base available. As new information becomes available, best practice can (...) suggests that stroke survi- vors who qualify for IRF services should receive this care in preference to SNF-based care. Rehabilitation Interventions in the Inpatient Hospital Setting There is strong evidence that organized, interprofessional stroke care not only reduces mortality rates and the likelihood of insti- tutional care and long-term disability but also enhances recov- ery and increases independence in ADLs. 47–50 Although many small, randomized, clinical trials have studied interventions

2016 American Academy of Neurology

17. The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR)

127 Appendix J: Preparatory Prosthesis Recommendations 129 Appendix K: Control Training for Body-Powered and Externally Powered Prostheses 132 Appendix L: Evidence Tables 134 Appendix M: Participant List 137 References 139 VA/DoD Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Page 7 of 149 Executive Summary Amputation presents a significant disability for the nearly two million Americans living with limb* loss. In approximately three (...) The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR) VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION REHABILITATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define

2014 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

18. Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis

outpatient rehabilitation possibly is effective for improving disability/function (PPMS, SPMS, EDSS 4.0–8.0) (1 Class II). Motor and sensory balance training or motor balance training (3 weeks) possibly is effective for improving static and dynamic balance, and motor balance training (3 weeks) possibly is effective for improving static balance (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS) (1 Class II). Breathing-enhanced upper extremity exercises (6 weeks) possibly are effective for improving timed gait and forced expiratory (...) of Perceived Exertion ; RRMS = relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis ; SF-36 = Short Form 36 Health Survey ; SPMS = secondary progressive multiple sclerosis ; SWP = standard weight placement ; TUG = Timed Up and Go test ; VAS = visual analog scale Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States and is a leading cause of disability in young adults. , , Rehabilitation interventions are frequently used clinical strategies for improving or maintaining functional status

2015 American Academy of Neurology

19. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

of care setting. Target Population: This guideline applies to adult patients (18 years or older) with post-stroke functional disability who may require rehabilitation in the VHA or DoD health care system. Audiences: The guideline is relevant to all healthcare professionals providing or directing treatment services to patients recovering from a stroke, in any healthcare setting (primary care, specialty care, and long-term care) and in community programs. Version 2.0 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline (...) for the October, 2010 Management of Stroke Rehabilitation Introduction Page - 3 Stroke Rehabilitation: Stroke is a leading cause of disability in the United States. (AHA, 1999) Forty percent of stroke patients are left with moderate functional impairment and 15% to 30% with severe disability. Effective rehabilitation interventions initiated early after stroke can enhance the recovery process and minimize functional disability. Improved functional outcomes for patients also contribute to patient satisfaction

2010 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

20. Common Principles of Rehabilitation for Adults in Audiology Services

Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO, 2001) …………………………………………………………………………………. 21 Appendix B: Resources for Identifying Individual difficulties, needs and expectations for measuring functional outcomes ………………………………………………………………… 28 @BSA 2016 Recommended Procedure Common Principles of Rehabilitation for Adults in Audiology Services BSA 2016 Page4 1. Introduction Hearing problems are often long-term conditions, which can be managed but not always cured. Effective rehabilitation is best (...) to both public and private services in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. This is a revised and updated version of BSA guidance produced in 2012. It was produced by the Professional Guidance Group in collaboration with members of BSA Adult Rehabilitation Interest Group. 1. Background and Context The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was officially endorsed by the World Health Organisation in 2001 as the framework for disability and health sectors

2016 British Society of Audiology

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