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Substance Abuse rehabilitation

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121. Management of COPD Exacerbations: An Official ERS/ATS Clinical Practice Guideline

supplemental oxygen, an impaired level of consciousness, cor pulmonale, a need for full-time nursing care, other reasons for hospitalisation (e.g. myocardial ischaemia), housing or food insecurity, poor social support, or active substance abuse. Values and preferences This recommendation places a high value on reducing hospital readmissions, improving patient safety and potentiallyalso decreasing mortality, and a lower value on the burdens of caring foracutely ill patients at home. Should pulmonary (...) patients, antibiotic therapy, home-based management, and the initiation of pulmonary rehabilitation within 3weeks after hospital discharge; and 3) a conditional recommendation against the initiation of pulmonary rehabilitation during hospitalisation. The Task Force provided recommendations related to corticosteroid therapy, antibiotic therapy, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, home-based management, and early pulmonary rehabilitation in patients having a COPD exacerbation. These recommendations

2017 American Thoracic Society

122. Enteral tube feeding for individuals with cystic fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation evidence-informed guidelines (Full text)

and/or substance abuse. Individual risk factors should be assessed as part of the decision to intervene with an enteral feeding tube [ x [14] Vandeleur, M., Massie, J., and Oliver, M. Gastrostomy in children with cystic fibrosis and portal hypertension. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr . 2013 ; 57 : 245–247 | | | , x [34] Loser, C., Aschl, G., Hebuterne, X. et al. ESPEN guidelines on artificial enteral nutrition—Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Clin Nutr . 2005 ; 24 : 848–861 | | | | ]. These risk (...) –748 | | | , x [10] Efrati, O., Mei-Zahav, M., Rivlin, J. et al. Long term nutritional rehabilitation by gastrostomy in Israeli patients with cystic fibrosis: Clinical outcome in advanced pulmonary disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr . 2006 ; 42 : 222–228 | | | , x [11] Oliver, M.R., Heine, R.G., Ng, C.H. et al. Factors affecting clinical outcome in gastrostomy-fed children with cystic fibrosis. Pediatr Pulmonol . 2004 ; 37 : 324–329 | | | , x [12] Rosenfeld, M., Casey, S., Pepe, M. et al

2016 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation PubMed abstract

124. Clinical Practice Guidelines From the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation for Preschoolers With Cystic Fibrosis

on Infectious Diseases, American Academy of Pediatrics . Recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedule—United States, 2014. Committee on Environmental Health Committee on Substance Abuse Committee on Adolescence Committee on Native American Child . From the American Academy of Pediatrics: Policy statement—Tobacco use: a pediatric disease. Uyan ZS , Ozdemir N , Ersu R , et al . Factors that correlate with sleep oxygenation in children with cystic fibrosis. van der Giessen LJ , Gosselink R , Hop

2016 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

125. 2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Non?ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines

Antiplatelet Therapy: Recommendations 61 6.2.2. Combined Oral Anticoagulant Therapy and Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With NSTE-ACS 62 6.2.3. Platelet Function and Genetic Phenotype Testing 64 6.3. Risk Reduction Strategies for Secondary Prevention 64 6.3.1. Cardiac Rehabilitation and Physical Activity: Recommendation 65 6.3.2. Patient Education: Recommendations 65 6.3.3. Pneumococcal Pneumonia: Recommendation 65 6.3.4. NSAIDs: Recommendations 66 6.3.5. Hormone Therapy: Recommendation 67 6.3.6 (...) therapy, antiplatelet therapy, antithrombotic therapy, beta blockers, biomarkers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac rehabilitation, conservative management, diabetes mellitus, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, heart failure, invasive strategy, lifestyle modification, myocardial infarction, nitrates, non-ST elevation, P2Y 12 receptor inhibitor, percutaneous coronary intervention, renin-angiotensin- aldosterone inhibitors, secondary prevention, smoking cessation, statins, stent, thienopyridines

2014 Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

126. Treatment and recommendations for homeless people with Opioid Use Disorders

the plan of care; implement strategies to minimize risk of diversion/ misuse (random drug tests, alternate day dosing, prescription monitoring program, directly observed therapy). Balance overall benefits of continuing MAT with potential harms. FOLLOW-UP ? Determine frequency of follow-up based on stability of the patient and his/her living situation and risk of diversion/ misuse/ abuse of medications used for treatment of opioid use disorders or other substances. ? At each visit, assess for behaviors (...) condition does not necessarily cause the other, but each can exacerbate problems associated with the other. Substance abuse can be both a precipitating factor and a consequence of homelessness.” (Zerger 2002) Barriers to treatment for homeless people with opioid use disorders Limited access to addiction treatment and fragmented health care delivery systems present significant obstacles to medical care for homeless people with substance use disorders, many of whom have serious co-occurring disorders

2014 National Health Care for the Homeless Council

127. Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: Guideline For the Management of Patients With

chronotropic and hypertensive actions, and direct myocardial toxicity (Section 7.10) (130). Methamphetamines are also associ- ated with ACS (131). Urine toxicology screening should be considered when substance abuse is suspected as a cause of or contributor to ACS, especially in younger patients ( 20% of previous troponin levels or an absolute increase of high- sensitivity cardiac troponin T values (e.g., >7ng/Lover 2 hours) may indicate reinfarction (183–185). During pregnancy, troponin values are within (...) ... e178 6.3. Risk Reduction Strategies for Secondary Prevention e179 6.3.1. Cardiac Rehabilitation and Physical Activity: Recommendation . e179 6.3.2. Patient Education: Recommendations ... e179 6.3.3. Pneumococcal Pneumonia: Recommendation.. e179 6.3.4. NSAIDs: Recommendations. e179 6.3.5. Hormone Therapy: Recommendation ... e180 6.3.6. Antioxidant Vitamins and Folic Acid: Recommendations . e181 6.4. Plan of Care for Patients With NSTE-ACS: Recommendations e181 6.4.1. Systems to Promote Care

2014 American College of Cardiology

128. Assessment of the 12-Lead ECG as a Screening Test for Detection of Cardiovascular Disease in Healthy General Populations of Young People (12?25 Years of Age) (Full text)

cardiovascular disease include bronchial asthma, ruptured cerebral aneurysm, use of performance-enhancing or other drugs and substances, heat stroke, and pulmonary embolus. The mechanism of death in the vast majority of these events is a ventricular tachyarrhythmia, with the major exception being Marfan syndrome and related disorders associated with aortic dilatation, in which SD usually occurs because of aortic dissection/rupture. SDs occur in a wide variety of sports, most commonly football and basketball (...) common than their actual frequency, or even the misconception that such deaths are virtually confined to athletes. Such misperceptions have legitimized screening initiatives limited to athletes, in turn perhaps diverting resources from the many other important public health issues for this age group, including but not confined to preventable accidents or other causes such as drug abuse, childhood obesity, and suicide intervention ( ). Indeed, in a 10-year study of US college athletes, Maron et al

2014 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

129. ACC/AHA/AACVPR/AAFP/ANA Concepts for Clinician?Patient Shared Accountability in Performance Measures (Full text)

adherent to therapeutic recommendations or participating actively in self-care strategies. Factors that can affect self-care include patient preferences, values, culture, religion, and socioeconomic status (ie, education, income, and occupation); psychological factors (eg, depression); behavioral factors (eg, substance abuse); cognitive factors (eg, health literacy, dementia); and environmental factors (eg, social support). Collecting information on these factors may be challenging (...) , APN, FAHA, FAAN , MD, MS, FAAFP , MD, MAACVPR, FACC , MD, MSPH, FACC, FAHA , and MD, FACS MBA Eric D. Peterson *ACC/AHA Representative. † National Committee for Quality Assurance Representative. ‡ American Society of Health System Pharmacists Representative. § ACC/AHA Task Force on Performance Measures Liaison. ‖ American Nurses Association Representative. ¶ American Academy of Family Physicians Representative. # American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Representative

2014 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

130. 2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (Full text)

, especially those with severe obesity (body mass index >35), have a higher long-term total mortality risk. Cocaine use can cause ACS by inducing coronary vasospasm, dissection, thrombosis, positive chronotropic and hypertensive actions, and direct myocardial toxicity (Section 7.10). Methamphetamines are also associated with ACS. Urine toxicology screening should be considered when substance abuse is suspected as a cause of or contributor to ACS, especially in younger patients (<50 years of age). 3.3.2.3 (...) Management) e376 6.2. Medical Regimen and Use of Medications at Discharge: Recommendations e376 6.2.1. Late Hospital and Posthospital Oral Antiplatelet Therapy: Recommendations e376 6.2.2. Combined Oral Anticoagulant Therapy and Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With NSTE-ACS e378 6.2.3. Platelet Function and Genetic Phenotype Testing e379 6.3. Risk Reduction Strategies for Secondary Prevention e379 6.3.1. Cardiac Rehabilitation and Physical Activity: Recommendation e379 6.3.2. Patient Education

2014 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

133. Guidelines for the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, secondary prevention, and future considerations. Results of new phase 3 trials were incorporated. Conclusions—Intracerebral hemorrhage remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with intracerebral hemorrhage. (Stroke. 2015;46:2032-2060. DOI: 10.1161/STR.0000000000000069.) Key (...) ) Rehabilitation and Recovery Given the potentially serious nature and complex pattern of evolving disability and the increasing evidence for efficacy, it is recommended that all patients with ICH have access to multidisciplinary rehabilitation (Class I; Level of Evidence A). (Revised from the previous guideline) BP indicates blood pressure; CT, computed tomography; DVT, deep vein thrombosis; EEG, electroencephalography; ICH, intracerebral hemorrhage; INR, international normalized ratio; MRI, magnetic

2015 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

134. Guidelines for the management of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (Full text)

and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Results— Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Topics focused on diagnosis, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, secondary prevention, and future considerations. Results of new phase 3 trials were (...) and assessment of ICH and its causes; hemostasis and coagulopathy; blood pressure (BP) management; inpatient management, including general monitoring and nursing care, glucose/temperature/seizure management, and other medical complications; procedures, including management of intracranial pressure (ICP), intraventricular hemorrhage, and the role of surgical clot removal; outcome prediction; prevention of recurrent ICH; rehabilitation; and future considerations. Each subcategory was led by a primary author

2015 American Academy of Neurology PubMed abstract

137. The Management of Chronic Multisymptom Illness

., abuse history), and occupational/environmental (e.g., chemical exposure). The categories of diagnostic technologies considered under this CPG include biomarkers (biological markers and neuroimaging studies), neuropsychological test batteries, and sleep studies. Some of the management approaches considered include team-based approaches, core competencies of the treatment team, patient-provider communication styles, the role of occupational and other rehabilitative services, behavioral health services (...) of 89 orientation to time, orientation to place, memorizing and repeating three non-related items, and spelling “world” backwards). [11] A psychosocial assessment is also critical in evaluating the patient with multisymptom illness and should include a screening for suicidal ideation and substance use disorders. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) is an excellent screening tool for assessing the presence of the most common psychiatric conditions associated with complaints of fatigue: depression

2014 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

138. Screening, Assessment, and Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer Guideline Adaptation (Full text)

medications, or antiemetics). Alcohol/substance abuse. Nutritional issues (including weight/caloric intake changes). Decreased functional status. Deconditioning/decreased activity level. As a shared responsibility, the clinical team must decide when referral to an appropriately trained professional (eg, cardiologist, endocrinologist, mental health professional, internist, and so on) is needed. Table 2. Potential Comorbid Conditions and Other Treatable Contributing Factors Possibly Associated With Fatigue (...) free and have transitioned to maintenance or adjuvant therapy (eg, patients with breast cancer receiving hormonal therapy, patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors). Target Audience This guidance is intended to inform health care professionals (eg, medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists, psychosocial and rehabilitation professionals, primary care providers, nurses, and others involved in the delivery of care for survivors) as well as patients, family

2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines PubMed abstract

140. Guidelines for the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage (Full text)

and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, secondary prevention, and future considerations. Results of new phase 3 trials were incorporated. Conclusions—Intracerebral hemorrhage remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with intracerebral hemorrhage. (Stroke. 2015;46:2032-2060. DOI: 10.1161/STR.0000000000000069.) Key (...) ) Rehabilitation and Recovery Given the potentially serious nature and complex pattern of evolving disability and the increasing evidence for efficacy, it is recommended that all patients with ICH have access to multidisciplinary rehabilitation (Class I; Level of Evidence A). (Revised from the previous guideline) BP indicates blood pressure; CT, computed tomography; DVT, deep vein thrombosis; EEG, electroencephalography; ICH, intracerebral hemorrhage; INR, international normalized ratio; MRI, magnetic

2015 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

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