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Substance Abuse rehabilitation

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1. Alcohol Abuse and Other Substance Use Disorders: Ethical Issues in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice

Alcohol Abuse and Other Substance Use Disorders: Ethical Issues in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice Alcohol Abuse and Other Substance Use Disorders: Ethical Issues in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice - ACOG Menu ▼ Alcohol Abuse and Other Substance Use Disorders: Ethical Issues in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice Page Navigation ▼ Number 633, June 2015 (Replaces Committee Opinion Number 422, December 2008) (Reaffirmed 2018) Committee on Ethics This Committee Opinion was developed (...) by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as a service to its members and other practicing clinicians. Although this document reflects the current viewpoint of the College, it is not intended to dictate an exclusive course of action in all cases. Alcohol Abuse and Other Substance Use Disorders: Ethical Issues in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice ABSTRACT: Alcohol abuse and other substance use disorders are major, often underdiagnosed health problems for women, regardless of age, race

2015 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

2. Guidelines for identification and management of substance use and substance use disorders in pregnancy

Guidelines for identification and management of substance use and substance use disorders in pregnancy The harmful use of alcohol and illicit drugs is the third leading risk factor for premature deaths and disabilities in the world. It is estimated that 2.5 million people worldwide died of alcohol- related causes in 2004, including 320 000 young people between 15 and 29 years of age. Contact Management of Substance Abuse Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse 20, Avenue Appia 1211 (...) collection and analysis 183 Main results 188 Annex 3: Screening instruments for substance use in prenatal or pregnant women 198 Annex 4: Composition of guideline groups 200 WHO Steering Group 200 Guideline Development Group (GDG) 201 External reviewers 202 Annex 5: Declarations of interest 203 GDG members 203 Consultants supporting GDG 203 External reviewers 204 iiiii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS These guidelines were produced by the WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse (Management of Substance Abuse

2014 World Health Organisation Guidelines

3. Abuse and violence - working with our patients in general practice

Abuse and violence - working with our patients in general practice www.racgp.org.au Healthy Profession. Healthy Australia. Abuse and violence Working with our patients in general practice (4th edition)Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice (4th edition) Disclaimer This text is directed at health practitioners possessing appropriate qualifications and skills in ascertaining and discharging their professional (including legal) duties. The information set out (...) or expense incurred or arising by reason of any person using or relying on the information contained in this publication and whether caused by reason of any error, negligent act, omission or misrepresentation in the information. Recommended citation Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice, 4th edn. Melbourne: The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, 2014. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners RACGP House 100 Wellington Parade East Melbourne VIC 3002

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

4. Drug and Alcohol Abuse amongst Anaesthetists - Guidance on Identification and Management 2

the rehabilitation of employees who develop substance abuse problems. 2.6 To give managers a clear framework within which to deal with substance abuse problems constructively. 3. General provisions 3.1 No-one will report for duty under the influence of any substance that affects his/her ability to carry out his/her duties. 3.2 No-one will consume alcohol or use substances of abuse whilst at work, including breaks. 3.3 Any individual found drunk or under the influence of any substance on duty will be subject (...) Walker for their contributions to this guideline. The working party would like to acknowledge the helpful advice of Mr Bertie Leigh of Hempsons Solicitors. 2 Contents 1. Summary 3 2. Introduction 4 3. Factors influencing substance abuse 6 4. The substance abusing anaesthetist 8 5. Initial interventions 12 6. The GMC and substance abusing doctors 14 7. T reatment, support and monitoring 15 8. Return to work 18 References 20 Appendix 1:Definitions 24 Appendix 2:Sour ces of support 27 Appendix 3:Example

2011 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

5. Coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse: community health and social care services

between services and people with coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse who use them). 1.3.7 Consider the suitability of the type of housing (for example, high to low support or independent tenancies), employment, detox, rehabilitation services or other support identified for the person, in collaboration with relevant providers. T ake the person's preferences into account. 1.3.8 Ensure agencies and staff communicate with each other so the person is not automatically discharged from (...) ). 1.6.4 Recognise that people with coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse are at higher risk of not using, or losing contact with, services. There are specific populations who are more at risk. These include men, young people, older people and women who are pregnant or have recently given birth. It also includes: people who are homeless people who have experienced or witnessed abuse or violence people with language difficulties people who are parents or carers who may fear

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

6. Management of Substance Use Disorder

, it is the language used in DoD policy and is thus used in this section. VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Substance Use Disorders December 2015 Page 18 of 169 rehabilitation of alcohol or other substance dependent persons in the Armed Forces.[57] In turn, the Secretary of Defense requires each of the Services to develop alcohol and other substance abuse prevention and control programs in accordance with Department of Defense Directive (DODD) 1010.4.[58] In response to these directives (...) are proactive and responsive to the needs of the DoD workforce by emphasizing alcohol and other substance abuse deterrence, prevention, education, and rehabilitation. The implementation of alcohol and other substance risk reduction and prevention strategies are designed to provide effective alcohol and other substance abuse prevention and education at all levels of command, and encourage commanders to provide alcohol and drug-free leisure activities. The ultimate goal of DoD substance use programs

2015 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

7. Comorbidity of mental disorders and substance use

: is a term for the consumption of a substance where the risk associated with the use is moderate or high, or where a substance is not being used for its intended therapeutic purpose, or use exceeds recommended therapeutic quantities. 3 Substance abuse is not a term favoured by the author but has been used in the context of information derived from publications using the DSM- IV diagnosis of substance abuse. 4 | 2.3 General management Management should be based on the patient’s readiness for change (...) behaviour and dizziness. Psychological presentations commonly associated with use (likely to resolve on cessation of substance use): Paranoia and psychosis (60-62) and depression (63, 64) . For further information please consult: National Directions on Inhalant Abuse Final Report (65) . http://www.health.vic.gov.au/drugservices/downloads/niat_report.pdf 3.7 Tobacco Tobacco comes from the dried leaves of the tobacco plant with the majority of tobacco consumption in Australia being via cigarettes. After

2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

8. Managing borderline personality disorder and substance use - an integrated approach

of sexual abuse, neglect, invalidating backgrounds Fear of rejection/abandonment Experience numerous crises and have chaotic lifestyle Transient, stress related paranoid ideation and/or dissociative episodes Marked impulsivity (eg. excessive spending, engaging in unsafe sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating) Reprinted from AUSTRAlIAn F AmIly PhySICIAn Vol. 40, no. 6, JUnE 2011 377Managing borderline personality disorder and substance use – an integrated approach FOCUS Staying focused (...) experiences, is central to the underlying experience of BPD. This dysregulation of emotion is often experienced by patients with BPD as intense highs and lows that feel intolerable and unrelenting, with substance abuse being a key coping strategy. Recommendations for the treatment of patients with BPD and SUD are listed in Table 2. part of any treatment. In this regard, clinicians should seize every single interpersonal opportunity to build up the skill level of this patient group. Issues

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

9. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

Management of Stroke Rehabilitation VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF STROKE REHABILITATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense And The American Hea rt Association/ American Stroke Association Prepared by: THE MANAGEMENT OF STROKE REHABILITATION Working Group With support from: The Office of Quality and Performance, VA, Washington, DC & Quality Management Division, United States Army MEDCOM QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA (...) , and limitations unique to an institution or type of practice. Every healthcare professional making use of these guidelines is responsible for evaluating the appropriateness of applying them in any particular clinical situation. Version 2.0 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 2 Guideline Update Working Group Participants 7 Key Points 8 Outcome Measures 8 THE PROVISION OF REHABILITATION CARE Algorithm 12 Annotations 15 Rehabilitation Interventions 69 APPENDICES Appendix A: Guideline Development Process 112

2010 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

10. The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR)

The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR) VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION REHABILITATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define (...) testing and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 1.0 – 2014 VA/DoD Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Page 2 of 149 Prepared by: The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Working Group

2014 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

11. Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery

Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery e1 Purpose—The aim of this guideline is to provide a synopsis of best clinical practices in the rehabilitative care of adults recovering from stroke. Methods—Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council’s Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA’s Manuscript Oversight Committee (...) Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results—Stroke rehabilitation requires a sustained and coordinated effort from a large team, including the patient and his or her goals, family and friends, other caregivers (eg, personal care attendants), physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, recreation therapists, psychologists, nutritionists, social workers, and others. Communication

2016 American Academy of Neurology

12. Rehabilitation of Lower Limb Amputation

Rehabilitation of Lower Limb Amputation VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR REHABILITATION OF INDIVIDUALS WITH LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard of care and should (...) and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 2.0 – 2017September 2017 Page 2 of 123 Prepared by: The Rehabilitation of Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation Work Group With support from: The Office of Quality, Safety and Value, VA, Washington, DC & Office of Evidence Based Practice, U.S

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

13. WHO Guidelines on Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE)

of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention); Tarun Dua (WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse); Manfred Huber (WHO Regional Office for Europe); Silvio Paolo Mariotti (WHO Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention); Maria Alarcos Moreno Cieza (WHO Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention); Alana Margaret Officer (WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course); Juan (...) Pablo Peña-Rosas (WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development); Anne Margriet Pot (WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course); Ritu Sadana (WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course); Céline Yvette Seignon Kandissounon (WHO Regional Office for Africa); Maria Pura Solon (WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development); Mark Humphrey Van Ommeren (WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse); Enrique Vega Garcia (WHO Regional Office for the Americas); Temo Waqanivalu (WHO

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

14. Management of COPD exacerbations: a European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society guideline

for hospitalisation ( e.g. myocardial ischaemia), housing or food insecurity, poor social support, or active substance abuse. Values and preferences This recommendation places a high value on reducing hospital readmissions (...) rehabilitation within 3 weeks after hospital discharge; and 3) a conditional recommendation against the initiation of pulmonary rehabilitation during hospitalisation. The Task Force provided recommendations related to corticosteroid therapy, antibiotic therapy, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, home-based management, and early pulmonary rehabilitation in patients having a COPD exacerbation. These recommendations should be reconsidered as new evidence becomes available. Abstract New guideline

2017 European Respiratory Society

15. Frailty in Older Adults - Early Identification and Management

for Seniors Clinical Care Management Guideline: 48/6 Model of Care, available at the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council website at: Key Recommendations See . Early identification and management of patients with frailty or vulnerable to frailty provides an opportunity to suggest appropriate preventive and rehabilitative actions (e.g. exercise program, review of diet and nutrition, medication review) to be taken to slow, prevent, or even reverse decline associated with frailty. Use a diligent case (...) meta-analysis found that frailty was associated with increased risk for several negative health outcomes, which are listed in Figure 2. 13 Figure 2: Increased risk of negative outcomes associated with frailty 13 Early identification of patients with frailty or vulnerable to frailty provides an opportunity to suggest appropriate preventive and rehabilitative actions (e.g. exercise program, review of diet and nutrition, medication review) to be taken to slow, prevent, or even reverse decline

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

16. Simplified guideline for prescribing medical cannabinoids in primary care

The risks of rare events, such as can- nabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (cyclic vomiting) and amotivational syndrome, are still being defined. 22,23 Cannabis use disorder (CUD), replacing previous can- nabis abuse and cannabis dependence, might be as common as appearing in one-fifth of regular cannabis users. 6 Risk of CUD is higher in those who use more frequently, are male, and begin at a younger age. 6,24 However, in another study of those meeting criteria for having CUD, 67% remitted (no longer met (...) use in Canada, 2012. Health Rep 2015;26(4):10-5. 2. Schauer GL, King BA, Bunnell RE, Promoff G, McAfee TA. Toking, vaping, and eat- ing for health or fun: marijuana use patterns in adults, U.S., 2014. Am J Prev Med 2016;50(1):1-8. Epub 2015 Aug 12. 3. Park JY, Wu LT. Prevalence, reasons, perceived effects, and correlates of medical marijuana use: a review. Drug Alcohol Depend 2017;177:1-13. Epub 2017 May 16. 4. Fischer B, Ialomiteanu AR, Aeby S, Rudzinski K, Kurdyak P, Rehm J. Substance use

2018 CPG Infobase

18. Occupational Therapists' Use of Occupation Focused Practice in Secure Hospitals

towards paid employment at the earliest opportunity, and during rehabilitation. (McQueen 2011 [C]) 1C 3 Royal College of Occupational Therapists 2017 Key recommendations for implementation Habituation 8. It is recommended that occupational therapists consider patients’ roles (past, present and future) within treatment planning and interventions. (Schindler 2005 [C]) 1C 9. It is recommended that occupational therapy facilitates a range of interventions that enable patients to engage in structured (...) context of secure services Secure services refer to those that provide care and treatment for patients with mental illness, personality disorder and neurodevelopmental disorders, including learning disabilities. Individuals typically have complex mental disorders, co-morbid difficulties of substance misuse and/or personality disorder, which are linked to offending or seriously irresponsible behaviour (NHS England 2013a). Those admitted to a secure care setting are detained under a section

2018 British Association of Occupational Therapists

19. Guidelines on Acute Pain Management

patients. 2.7.4 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. 2.7.5 Maor i . 2.7.6 Other ethnic groups and non-English speaking people. 2.7.7 Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. 2.7.8 Patients with concurrent hepatic or renal disease. 2.7.9 Opioid-tolerant patients. 2.7.10 Patients with a substance abuse disorder. 2.7.11 Patients with cognitive behavioural and/or sensory impairments. 3. EDUCATION 3.1 Education regarding acute pain management should be part of the medical undergraduate core (...) , its role in recovery and rehabilitation, and options available (pharmacological and non- pharmacological), is an essential component of an acute pain management consultation. 3.3.2 Availability of appropriate reading material will enhance patient and carer understanding and expectations of available pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. 4. ASSESSMENT OF ANALGESIC EFFICACY AND ADVERSE EFFECTS 4.1 Tailoring of treatment regimens to the individual patient requires that regular

2013 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

20. Clinical practice guideline for care in pregnancy and puerperium

is the benefit of the treatments for low back pain post-dural puncture? 75. What is the benefit of the treatments for constipation? 76. What is the benefit of the rehabilitation of the pelvic floor muscles during the puerperium?CPG FOR CARE IN PREGNANCY AND PUERPERIUM 17 Contraception during the puerperium 77. At what point can a contraceptive treatment after delivery be started? 78. What special considerations should be made after delivery by type of birth control? Mental health during the puerperium 79 (...) and symptoms of domestic violence during pregnancy, asking women about possible abuse in an environment where they feel safe, at least at the first prenatal visit, on a quarterly basis and in the postpartum visit. Sexuality Weak We suggest providing information to pregnant women and their partners about the possibility of having sexual relations regularly during pregnancy because these are not associated with any risk to the foetus.CPG FOR CARE IN PREGNANCY AND PUERPERIUM 29 Travelling v An assessment

2014 GuiaSalud

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