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Sports Medicine rehabilitation

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1. Medical Training to Achieve Competency in Lifestyle Counseling: An Essential Foundation for Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases and Other Chronic Medical Conditions: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

. The first national Lifestyle Medicine Think Tank was held on September 9 and 10, 2013, in Greenville, SC. Sponsored by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and cohosted by the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville and Harvard’s Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Think Tank explored how best to integrate lifestyle medicine competencies into US medical school curricula. Representatives from the American College of Sports Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), American Medical (...) performance domains similar to the ones proposed by the American College of Sports Medicine but with simplified learning objectives that are likely amendable to most medical school curricula. Table 3. Learning Objectives for Physical Activity and Exercise Assessment and Counseling During Undergraduate Medical Training Domains Learning Objectives Physical activity assessment Describe the normal physiological responses to an acute bout of exercise and adaptations to aerobic and resistance exercise training

2016 American Heart Association

2. Interagency Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Pain Agency Medical Directors' Group (AMDG)

drug therapy or comorbid medical conditions) Patient has experienced a severe adverse outcome or overdose event Patient has a substance use disorder (except tobacco) Use of opioids is not in compliance with DOH’s pain management rules or consistent with the AMDG Guideline Patient exhibits aberrant behaviors (Table 9) Clinical Recommendations 1. Help the patient understand that chronic pain is a complex disease, and opioids alone cannot adequately address all of the patient’s pain-related needs (...) Appendix D: Urine Drug Testing for Monitoring Opioid Therapy 62 Appendix E: Chronic Pain Syndromes in Cancer Survivors 72 Appendix F: Diagnosis-based Pharmacotherapy for Pain and Associated Conditions 74 Appendix G: Patient Education Resources 76 Appendix H: Clinical Tools and Resources 78 Appendix I: Guideline Development and AGREE II Criteria 81 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 87 REFERENCES 89 Interagency Guideline on Prescribing Opioids for Pain [06-2015] 3 Table of Figures and Tables Figure A. Three Item PEG

2015 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

3. Prevention of Acute Nausea and Vomiting due to Antineoplastic Medication in Pediatric Cancer Patients

: Additional Literature Search: Dronabinol and Levomepromazine 142 Appendix E: Quality of Evidence and Strength of Recommendation 148 Appendix F: Tables of Included Studies 149 F.1 Summary of studies used to inform recommendation #2a 149 F.1a Highly emetogenic antineoplastic therapy as ranked by POGO Guideline for Classification of the Acute Emetogenic Potential of antineoplastic Medication in Pediatric Cancer Patients 5 Version date: February 28, 2013 F.1b Highly emetogenic antineoplastic therapy (...) as ranked by study investigators where insufficient information available to assign emetogenic risk using the POGO Guideline for Classification of the Acute Emetogenic Potential of antineoplastic Medication in Pediatric Cancer Patients F.2 Summary of studies used to inform recommendation #2b 154 F.2a Moderately emetogenic antineoplastic therapy as ranked by POGO Guideline for Classification of the Acute Emetogenic Potential of antineoplastic Medication in Pediatric Cancer Patients F.2b Moderately

2013 SickKids Supportive Care Guidelines

4. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 15: Legal Aspects of Medical Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations

and rational” and consistent with other specialists’ recommendations in federal disability discrimination litigation by a medically disqualified intercollegiate athlete against a university. These 2 cases hold that the federal disability discrimination laws (the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act) require only that a student-athlete’s exclusion from an interscholastic or intercollegiate sport be based on an individualized medical evaluation and that disqualification must have (...) . A physician’s general legal duty is to conform to accepted, customary, or reasonable medical practice providing medical sports participation recommendations consistent with an athlete’s medical best interests from both a short- and long-term perspective. , Courts generally have recognized that guidelines established by national medical associations are evidence of good medical practice, but they are not conclusive evidence of the medical or legal standard of care. Avoidance of the unnecessary restriction

2015 American Heart Association

5. Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff

Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff ESHRE Psychology and Counselling Guideline Development Group March 2015 Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction – A guide for fertility staff 1 Disclaimer The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (hereinafter referred to as 'ESHRE') developed the current clinical practice guideline to provide clinical recommendations to improve (...) every effort to compile accurate information and to keep it up-to-date, it cannot, however, guarantee the correctness, completeness, and accuracy of the guideline in every respect. In any event, these clinical practice guidelines do not necessarily represent the views of all clinicians that are members of ESHRE. The information provided in this document does not constitute business, medical, or other professional advice, and is subject to change. 2 CONTENTS Disclaimer 2 I. Introduction and scope

2015 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

6. Medical Nutrition Education, Training, and Competencies to Advance Guideline-Based Diet Counseling by Physicians: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association

are especially important for those planning careers in primary care, cardiology, neurology, endocrinology, obesity treatment, gastroenterology, oncology, intensive care medicine, and some surgical subspecialties. Although expanded nutrition competencies are needed across all health professions, those presented herein are limited to medical students and trainees and form the basis of the entrustable professional activities (EPAs) related to nutrition that are also presented. Educational resources for building (...) below. Integrating Nutrition Education and Training During UME As noted, most of the small number of medical schools that exceed the minimum 25 hours of nutrition education do so by horizontally and vertically integrating nutrition content across the learning continuum ; that is, across organ system didactics, small group sessions, skill-building clinical exposures, and electives. For instance, at Boston University School of Medicine (through a nutrition Vertical Integration Group), the University

2018 American Heart Association

7. Beyond Medications and Diet: Alternative Approaches to Lowering Blood Pressure Full Text available with Trip Pro

to avoid or delay drug therapy when clinically appropriate. Fourth, there is an increasing prevalence of resistant hypertension. Combination strategies incorporating these alternative approaches might be helpful to achieve BP control among individuals with resistant hypertension. Fifth, most of the reviewed alternative approaches pose little to no side effects and could thus represent acceptable options for individuals with multiple medication intolerances. Finally, despite numerous efforts (...) that included alternative BP-lowering approaches and excluded orally active agents such as dietary changes, complementary therapies, herbs, and novel medications. The writing group then classified the approaches into 3 broad categories: behavioral therapies, including meditation techniques, yoga, biofeedback, and relaxation or stress-reduction programs; noninvasive procedures or devices, including device-guided breathing modulation and acupuncture; and exercise-based regimens, including aerobic, resistance

2013 American Heart Association

8. Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: ajoint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement

of Sport and Exercise Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa (Dr Heine); Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Hospital, Brunei Darussalam (Mr Khiong); Care Transitions and Population Health Management, New York University Langone Health Medical Center, New York City (Dr Mola); National Cardiovascular Center, Harapan Kita, Jakarta, Indonesia (Dr Radi); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Gregorio Marañón General University Hospital (...) , International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Iranian Heart Foundation, Grupo Latinoamericano de Trabajo en Prevencion y Rehabilitacion Cardiaca, Nepal Physiotherapy Society, Philippine Heart Association, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, Russian National Society of Preventive Cardiology, Society of Indian Physiotherapists, South African Sports Medicine Association, and Taiwan Academy of Physical Medicine

2020 CPG Infobase

9. Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement Full Text available with Trip Pro

Medicine, Iranian Heart Foundation, Grupo Latinoamericano de Trabajo en Prevencion y Rehabilitacion Cardiaca, Nepal Physiotherapy Society, Philippine Heart Association, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, Russian National Society of Preventive Cardiology, Society of Indian Physiotherapists, South African Sports Medicine Association, Taiwan Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. This author takes responsibility for all aspects of the reliability and freedom from bias of the data (...) Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement Promoting patient utilization of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: A joint International Council and Canadian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation position statement - ScienceDirect JavaScript is disabled on your browser. Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page

2020 CPG Infobase

10. The Subacute Rehabilitation of Childhood Stroke, Clinical Guideline

rehabilitation when: CBR N/A a) Fewer disciplines are involved and less intensity is required. b) The child is medically stable. c) The family prefers this setting due to social or geographical reasons. d) The child is less fatigued and able to travel to appointments. e) The child’s goals are best met in the school or community setting. f) The child is at a safe functional level for the family to manage care at home. Group therapy should be considered in addition to standard individualised therapy (...) of those who consented for their names to be acknowledged in publications are printed here. We would also like to acknowledge the guidance provided by Tanya Medley in the development of the methodology for this guideline. Abbreviations AIS Arterial ischaemic stroke CBR Consensus-based recommendation EBR Evidence-based recommendation GDC Guideline Development Committee mCIMT Modified constraint induced movement therapy NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council PSD Program for Students

2017 Stroke Foundation - Australia

11. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

of stroke rehabilitation, from which Work Group members were recruited. The specialties and clinical areas of interest included: primary care, neurology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, rehabilitation psychology, neuropsychology, psychiatry, nursing, social work, physical and rehabilitation medicine, vocational rehabilitation, speech language pathology, vision therapy, clinical pharmacology, internal medicine, case management, medical management, public health, and evidence-based medicine (...) Disposition of the Inpatient with Stroke Abbreviations: CBT: cognitive behavioral therapy; PM&R: physical medicine and rehabilitation; SNRI: serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor; SSRI: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Stroke Rehabilitation July 2019 Page 19 of 170 B. Module B: Outpatient/Community-Based Rehabilitation Abbreviations: CBT: cognitive behavioral therapy; CPG: clinical practice guideline; PM&R: physical medicine

2019 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

12. Cardiac rehabilitation

5.3 Physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour 10 5.4 Diet 12 5.5 Long-term maintenance of behaviour change 14 6 Psychosocial health 15 6.1 Introduction 15 6.2 Models of psychological care 15 6.3 Measurement of psychological well-being 16 6.4 Psychological therapies and interventions 16 7 Vocational rehabilitation 19 7.1 Introduction 19 7.2 Interventions 19 Cardiac rehabilitation Contents8 Medical risk management 20 8.1 Introduction 20 8.2 Prescribing practices 20 8.3 Medication (...) to patient need and preference. Identifying health beliefs and correcting misconceptions through patient education is the key to this approach. Three further areas of intervention are highlighted: lifestyle risk factor management, psychosocial health, and medical risk management, with the focus on long-term strategies. The core components are outlined in Figure 1. SIGN published its first cardiac rehabilitation guideline in 2002 (SIGN 57). The guideline reviewed the evidence for what was then called

2017 SIGN

13. Rehabilitation in the wake of covid-19 - A phoenix from the ashes

care teams should be supported by outreach activity from secondary services including; a. Cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation b. Sports and exercise medicine c. Neurorehabilitation and neurological disability services d. Vocational rehabilitation. 4. Specialist rehabilitation should be delivered by coordinated multi-disciplinary rehabilitation teams comprising: a. Rehabilitation Medicine b. Psychiatric and neuropsychiatric support c. Rehabilitation nursing d. Physiotherapy e. Occupational therapy (O/T (...) stage after patients first leave the ITU setting when they may still be infectious. 3. Close integration of hospital and community services with collaborative commissioning arrangements. Primary care teams should be supported by outreach activity from secondary services including primary care supported by cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, sports and exercise medicine, neurorehabilitation and neurological disability services. 4. Multi-disciplinary rehabilitation teams comprising all the relevant

2020 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

14. Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery

as being homebound by a physician (defined by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services as unable to leave the home except to receive medical care or to have occa- sional nonmedical trips). HHCAs focus on delivering skilled nursing care and rehabilitation therapy (eg, OT, PT, SLT), as well as some limited assistance with daily tasks provided by home health aides supervised by nurses. Care encompasses medical and social needs and services that are designed to assist the patient in living in his (...) Furthermore, some data suggest that prophylactic use of antiepi- leptic drug therapy may be associated with poorer outcome. 199–202 The risk-benefit analysis of antiepileptic drug use after a recent stroke includes an important concern that does not pertain to many neurological settings. Evidence suggests that many of the medicines used to treat seizures, including phenytoin and ben- zodiazepines, dampen some mechanisms of neural plasticity that contribute to behavioral recovery after stroke. 203–205

2016 American Academy of Neurology

15. The Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation (UEAR)

, Occupational Therapy, Physiatry, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy, Prosthetics, Psychology, Recreational Therapy, Social Work and Surgery. The guideline development process for the 2014 CPG update consisted of the following steps: 1. Formulating evidence questions (Key Questions) 2. Conducting the systematic reviewVA/DoD Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Page 13 of 149 3. Convening a face-to-face meeting (...) With support from: The Office of Quality, Safety and Value, VA, Washington, DC & Office of Evidence Based Practice, US Army Medical Command Version 1.0 – 2014 Based on evidence reviewed through June 2013 VA/DoD Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Page 3 of 149 Table of Contents Executive Summary 7 Introduction and Background 8 Long-Term Goals of Upper Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation Care 9 Organization of This Clinical Practice

2014 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

16. Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis

intensity, duration, and frequency of interventions. Studies of rehabilitation need to be held to the same strict standards as drug therapies. Protocols need to enhance participant and assessor blinding. Sham interventions may be useful for participant blinding. Objective assessments are needed that measure impairment. Researchers must select outcome measures that are most sensitive to the specific intervention and must select the meaningful, plausible primary outcome carefully. For instance, short-term (...) , WA; the Department of Neurology (C.T.B., M.J.A.), University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore; Research Service (C.T.B.), VA Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore; the Departments of Neurology and Community Health (A.C.L.), Brown University, Providence, RI; Rehabilitation Research and Development Center for Restorative and Regenerative Medicine (A.C.L.), Providence VA Medical Center, RI; Mandell Center for Multiple Sclerosis (A.C.L.), Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital, Hartford, CT

2015 American Academy of Neurology

17. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

K. Discharge Patient from Rehabilitation; 66 Annotation L. Arrange For Medical Follow-Up 67 8.1 Long-Term Management 67 Version 2.0 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the October, 2010 Management of Stroke Rehabilitation Introduction Page - 11 TREATMENT INTERVENIONS for REHABILITATION AFTER STROKE 9 DYSPHAGIA MANAGEMENT 70 10 NUTRITION MANAGEMENT 71 11 COGNITIVE REHABILITATION 73 11.1 Non-Drug Therapies for Cognitive Impairment 73 11.2 Use of Drugs to Improve Cognitive Impairment 74 11.3 (...) PHASE 15 1.1 Organization of Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Care 15 Annotation B. Initial Assessment of Complication, Impairment and Rehabilitation Needs 16 1.2 Brief Assessment 16 1.3 Screening for Aspiration Risk 16 Annotation C. Assessment of Stroke Severity 18 1.4 Use of Standardized Assessments 18 Annotation D. Initiate Secondary Prevention and Early Interventions 20 1.5 Secondary Stroke Prevention 20 1.6 Early Intervention of Rehabilitation Therapy 20 Annotation F. Obtain Medical History

2010 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

18. Quality indicators for pulmonary rehabilitation programs in Canada: A CTS expert working group report

University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; b Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; c Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; d Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; e Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; f Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine (...) Medicine, Respiratory Research Center, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; m Pulmonary Division, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada ABSTRACT RATIONALE: Delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) varies widely across Canada. There is a need for evidence-based quality indicators (QI) that can be used to identify variations in the quality of PR with the aim of improving health outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To use an evidence-based, systematic process

2019 Canadian Thoracic Society

19. Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Scientific Statement

and patients to design HBCR Thomas et al. JACC VOL. -,NO. -,2019 Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation -,2019:-–- 4programs to include important and effective risk- modifying health behaviors that patients can directly control (physical activity, healthy eating, medication adherence, smoking, and stress management). Patient Assessment All studies we reviewed included an initial baseline evaluation of participants. Details of those assessments varied but generally followed the recommendations (...) of medication therapyfor CVD riskfactor management, close coordination of care between the CR staff and the patient’s physician is critically important as the need arises for adjustments in preventive medica- tions. In addition, several components of HBCR and CBCRexertanimportanteffectonCVDriskfactorcontrol, including counseling to optimize exercise training, dietary therapy, stress management, and medication adherence. Three studies explicitly reported providing

2019 American College of Cardiology

20. Stroke rehabilitation in adults

) should be followed up within 72 hours by the specialist stroke rehabilitation team for assessment of patient-identified needs and the development of shared management plans. 1.1.17 Provide advice on prescribed medications for people after stroke in line with recommendations in Medicines adherence (NICE clinical guideline 76). 1.2 Planning and delivering stroke rehabilitation Screening and assessment Screening and assessment 1.2.1 On admission to hospital, to ensure the immediate safety and comfort (...) recommendations 32 2.1 Upper limb electrical stimulation 32 2.2 Intensive rehabilitation after stroke 32 2.3 Neuropsychological therapies 33 2.4 Shoulder pain 33 3 Other information 35 3.1 Scope and how this guideline was developed 35 3.2 Related NICE guidance 35 4 The Guideline Development Group, National Collaborating Centre and NICE project team 37 4.1 Guideline Development Group 37 4.2 National Clinical Guideline Centre 38 4.3 NICE project team 39 About this guideline 41 Strength of recommendations 41

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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