How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

159 results for

Shoulder Rehabilitation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

141. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of rotator cuff syndrome in the workplace

& Environmental Physician Private Practice Dr Roslyn Avery Rehabilitation Physician Private Practice Mr Greg Black Consumer Representative Self-Employed – Trade Industry Mr Patrick Frances Consumer Representative Volunteer Worker Ms Kate Hopman Independent Guideline Development Expert Lukersmith & Associates Dr Lee Krahe Head of Research Port Macquarie Campus, Rural Clinical School, UNSW Dr Yong Hian Liaw Orthopaedic Surgeon Port Macquarie Base Hospital and Private Practice Ms Sue Lukersmith Independent (...) 9.6.3 Recovery and Outcomes Following Rotator Cuff Surgery 51 Resources 53 Rotator Cuff Syndrome Information Sheet 55 General Practitioner Guide – Return to Work 57 Employer Guide – Return to Work 59 Flowchart: First Presentation – Shoulder Pain 61 Flowchart: Review (Post 4–6 weeks) 63 Flowchart: Red Flags for Rotator Cuff Syndrome 65 Glossary 66 APPEnDIx 1 Red and Y ellow Flags for Rotator Cuff Syndrome 67 APPEnDIx 2 Clinical Questions 68 APPEnDIx 3 nHMRC Evidence Hierarchy 70 APPEnDIx 4

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

143. Occupational therapy for people with Parkinson's disease

and Neurosurgery, London. Jill now works in independent practice undertaking consultancy, training and service development projects within neurological occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Specialist Section Neurological Practice In partnership withAbout the publisher www.cot.org.uk The College of Occupational Therapists is a wholly owned subsidiary of the British Association of Occupational Therapists (BAOT) and operates as a registered charity. It represents the profession nationally and internationally (...) does not mean lack of effi cacy. All this is now changing. First, there is an increasing recognition that other types of evidence should be considered as well as the gold standard randomised controlled trial. Second, there is a growing consensus about the role of an occupational therapist in treating people with Parkinson’s. And third, there is a large, multicentre randomised controlled trial starting, PD REHAB, funded by the Health Technology Assessment programme, which will examine the impact

2010 Publication 1554

144. Management of Stable Coronary Artery Disease

. 110, DE-70376 Stuttgart, Germany.Tel:+49 711 8101 3456, Fax:+49711 8101 3795, Email: udo.sechtem@rbk.de Entities having participated in the development of this document: ESC Associations: Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA), European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI), European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation (EACPR), European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI), Heart Failure Association (HFA) ESC Working Groups (...) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2977 7.1.2.10 Cardiac rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2977 7.1.2.11 In?uenza vaccination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2977 7.1.2.12 Hormone replacement therapy . . . . . . . . . . . .2977 7.1.3 Pharmacological management of stable coronary artery disease patients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2977 7.1.3.1 Aims of treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2977 7.1.3.2 Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2978 ESC

2013 European Society of Cardiology

145. Nurse entrepreneurs - turning initiative into independence

provided reassurance, a source of reliable information, a shoulder to cry on and a tension diffuser. None of the parents talked in any detail about the physical care she gave to their sick children. The response of the patients varied according to their illness. One said.‘Y ou can change dressings without hurting me very much, and you always tell me a nice story when you come’, while another commented,‘Y ou make the morning go much quicker and you make sure I don’t have to go to hospital (...) to illness or holiday can be covered. There are two serious drawbacks. First, if a partner makes a bad decision, all the partners shoulder the consequences. Under these circumstances, partners could have personal possessions confiscated to pay creditors, whether they were directly involved in making the decision or not. Secondly, if one partner is declared personally bankrupt, creditors can seize the other partner’s share of the business. Death does not release anyone from partnership obligations

2007 Royal College of Nursing

146. Opioid prescription in chronic pain conditions guidelines for South Australian general practitioners

psychological or rehabilitative treatments, and close supervision of dispensed S8 opioids. The referring GP should understand that recommended interventions may be legally enforced by the DDU through the state Authority process if the patient is to continue to access S8 opioids. Therefore these interventions, as far as reasonably known and understood, should be raised by the GP and discussed with the patient. How can GPs assess for risks of abuse, addiction, and diversion and manage their patients (...) to the agreement. A treatment plan should be developed addressing the presenting problem, and documented in patient notes. The plan should consider different treatment modalities depending on the physical and psychosocial impairment relating to the pain, e.g. formal rehabilitation program, use of behavioural strategies, non-invasive techniques, and use of medicines. Documentation should support the evaluation, reason for opioid prescribing, the overall pain management treatment plan, any consultations received

2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

147. Management of diabetes

and progression of kidney disease in diabetes 84 9.3 Screening for kidney disease in diabetes 85 9.4 Investigation of kidney disease in diabetes 87 9.5 Prevention and treatment of kidney disease in diabetes 87 9.6 Management of complications 93 9.7 Models of care 94 9.8 Checklist for provision of information 9510 Prevention of visual impairment 96 10.1 Risk identification and prevention 96 10.2 Screening 97 10.3 Treatment 100 10.4 Rehabilitation 102 10.5 Checklist for provision of information 102 11

2010 SIGN

148. Perinatal brachial plexus palsy

trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on prevention and treatment of PBPP was performed. The background data on which this statement is based are found in the . There are no prospective studies on cause or prevention of PBPP. Whereas birth trauma is the most common cause, there is evidence suggesting that PBPP can occur before delivery. PBPP has been associated with shoulder dystocia, infants who are large for gestational age, maternal diabetes and instrumental delivery; however (...) of the nerve injury and its potential sequelae. This should include the following information: PBPP is not always preventable. 75% of infants recover completely within the first month of life. 25% experience permanent impairment and disability. If the physical examination shows incomplete recovery by the end of the first month, referral to a multidisciplinary brachial plexus team should be made. The team should include neurologists and/or physiatrists, rehabilitation therapists and plastic surgeons

2012 Canadian Paediatric Society

149. Reducing risk in heart disease - an expert guide to clinical practice for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

to the health professional’s judgement in each individual case, within the context of the goals of treatment. All treatments should be personalised according to the patient’s prognosis, comorbidities, drug tolerance, lifestyle/living circumstances and wishes. • This guide can be used by health professionals across the continuum of CHD care, including in acute settings, general practice, primary care, cardiac rehabilitation, and community and allied health services. • General practitioners (GP) can use (...) . Note: it is not generally recommended that patients with CHD do vigorous physical activity. • Incidental physical activity is also important to keep patients moving as often, and in as many ways, as possible. Encourage patients to sit less and move more throughout the day. • Refer patients to a cardiac rehabilitation program and/or an exercise physiologist where appropriate and available. • A structured rehabilitative physical activity program, supervised by qualified fitness personnel, should

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

150. Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury

Rehabilitation Centre Adrian Byak Physiotherapist Spinal Cord Injury Assistive Technology Seating Service Northern Sydney Central Coast Health Service Private Practice Danielle Collins Senior Occupational Therapist Spinal Cord Injury Prince of Wales Hospital Spinal Unit Allie Di Marco Occupational Therapist Spinal Cord Injury Private practice Linda Elliott Statewide Equipment Advisor EnableNSW Health Support Services NSW Health Bill Fisher Rehabilitation Engineer Assistive Technology Seating Service Northern (...) Sydney Central Coast Health Service Kate Hopman Senior Occupational Therapist Traumatic Brain Injury Liverpool Hospital Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit Greg Killeen Spinal cord injury consumer representative Suzanne Lulham Director, Service Delivery Lifetime Care & Support Authority Jodie Nicholls Senior Occupational Therapist Brain Injury Westmead Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit Representative of Occupational Therapy Australia – NSW Division Thi Hong Nguyen Brain injury consumer representative

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

152. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition) ? ? ? ? Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine ? ? ? Endorsed by: Faculty?of?Pain?Medicine,?Royal?College?of? Anaesthetists,?United?Kingdom?? Royal?College?of?Anaesthetists,? United?Kingdom?? Australian?Pain?Society? Australasian?Faculty?of?Rehabilitation?Medicine? College?of?Anaesthesiologists,?? Academy?of?Medicine,?Malaysia? College (...) . It was approved by the NHMRC and published by the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) and its Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM) in 2005. It was also endorsed by a number of major organisations — the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), the Royal College of Anaesthetists (United Kingdom), the Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the Royal Australian and New Zealand

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

153. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening

findings or other imaging studies, or obvious deformities in spinal curvature. Screening Tests Most screening tests for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are noninvasive. Screening is usually done by visual inspection of the spine to look for asymmetry of the shoulders, shoulder blades, and hips. In the United States, the forward bend test is commonly used to screen for idiopathic scoliosis. First, a clinician visually inspects the spine of a patient while the patient is standing upright. Next (...) Society on Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment recommends screening for idiopathic scoliosis through school-based programs, and that screening should be performed by clinicians who specialize in spinal deformities. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) members include the following individuals: David C. Grossman, MD, MPH (Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle); Susan J. Curry, PhD (University of Iowa, Iowa City); Douglas K. Owens, MD, MS (Veterans

2018 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

154. Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care

unit care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E45 4.2 Components of acute inpatient care . . . . . . . . . . . E48 5 5: : S St tr ro ok ke e r re eh ha ab bi il li it ta at ti io on n a an nd d c co om mm mu un ni it ty y r re ei in nt te eg gr ra at ti io on n E52 5.1 Initial stroke rehabilitation assessment . . . . . . . . . E52 5.2 Provision of inpatient stroke rehabilitation . . . . . . E54 5.3 Components of inpatient stroke rehabilitation . . E56 5.4 Outpatient (...) and community-based rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58 5.5 Follow-up and community reintegration . . . . . . . . E61 6 6: : S Se el le ec ct te ed d t to op pi ic cs s i in n s st tr ro ok ke e m ma an na ag ge em me en nt t E63 6.1 Dysphagia assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63 6.2 Identification and management of post-stroke depression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65 6.3 Vascular cognitive impairment

2009 CPG Infobase

155. Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 5.3 Components of Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 5.4 Identi?cation and Management of Post-Stroke Depression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 5.5 Shoulder Pain Assessment and Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 5.6 Community-Based Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Section 6 | Follow-up and Community Reintegration After Stroke (...) did not appear on the draft topic list. These were considered by the Ad Hoc Groups; as a result, some topics were revised and three topics (post-stroke depression, post-stroke shoulder pain, and community rehabilitation) were added. No topics were eliminated. Following this process, a set of draft recommendations was presented to a group of 40 stroke experts and relevant stakeholders from across the country during the Best Practices and Standards National Consensus Conference, held in Halifax

2008 CPG Infobase

156. Early Breast Cancer

and treatment of lymphoedema, assuring full range of movements of arm and shoulder, and prevention or correction of postural defects resulting from mastectomy. There are no data indicating that any type of physiotherapy may in- crease the risk of recurrence. When indicated, patients should not be denied access to rehabilitation services [I, A]. Available data, albeit with some limitations, con?rm the safety of pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer. Pregnancy may be considered after completion of ChT (...) one of the strongest predictors of long-term prognosis in primary breast cancer. ALND is associated with lymphoedema affecting the upper limb in up to 25% of women following sur- gery (up to 15% following axillary RT without surgical clearance and below 10% following SLNB) [72, 73]. The incidence of lym- phoedema rises signi?cantly (to 40%) when axillary clearance is combined with RT to the axilla. SLNB delivers less morbidity in terms of shoulder stiffness and arm swelling and allows

2020 European Society for Medical Oncology

157. Standardization of Spirometry 2019 Update. An Official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society Technical Statement

or the ability to calculate mean barometric pressure using altitude above sea level (27). Testing should preferably occur in a quiet and comfortable environment that is separated from the waiting room and other patientsbeingtested.Drinkingwatershould be available. Tissues or paper towels should be offered to help patients deal with secretions. The patient should be seated erect, with shoulders slightly back and chin slightly elevated. A chair with arms (to prevent falling sideways should syncope occur (...) people for adverse effects of exposure to injurious agents To watch for adverse reactions to drugs with known pulmonary toxicity Disability/impairment evaluations To assess patients as part of a rehabilitation program To assess risks as part of an insurance evaluation To assess individuals for legal reasons Other Research and clinical trials Epidemiological surveys Derivation of reference equations Preemployment and lung health monitoring for at-risk occupations To assess health status before

2020 European Respiratory Society

158. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) Guideline

. Buschbacher, R., Median nerve motor conduction to the abductor pollicis brevis. American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation/Association of Academic Physiatrists, 1999. 78(6 Suppl): p. S1. 12. Sander, H.W., et al., Median and ulnar palm-wrist studies. Clinical neurophysiology, 1999. 110(8): p. 1462-1465. 13. Grossart, E.A., N.D. Prahlow, and R.M. Buschbacher, Acceptable differences in sensory and motor latencies between the median and ulnar nerves. Journal of long-term effects of medical (...) implants, 2006. 16(5). 14. Berkson, A., J. Lohman, and R.M. Buschbacher, Comparison of median and radial sensory studies to the thumb. Journal of long-term effects of medical implants, 2006. 16(5). 15. Robinson, L.R., P.J. Micklesen, and L. Wang, Strategies for analyzing nerve conduction data: superiority of a summary index over single tests. Muscle & nerve, 1998. 21(9): p. 1166-1171. 16. Robinson, L.R., Electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics of North

2017 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

159. Family Caregiving for Individuals With Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

that caregivers shoulder substantial out-of-pocket costs related to caregiving, often paired with irrecoverable loss of income, benefits, and career opportunities that can be financially burdensome. , These costs may be disproportionately borne by older adults, women, and minority populations already at higher risk for financial insecurity. , Physical and Psychological Health In addition to financial costs, significantly higher physical and psychological health risks have been observed for decades (...) support program (REACH-HF) • Delivered at home with face-to-face and telephone contacts over 12 wk (typically 4–6 contacts) • Significant increase in caregiver confidence at 12 mo in the intervention group • No significant difference in anxiety, depression, or quality of life COPE indicates Creativity, Optimism, Planning, and Expert Information; Ctrl, control; HF, heart failure; HRQOL, health-related quality of life; Int, intervention; and REACH-HF, Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure

2020 American Heart Association

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country