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161. Management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer

of Clinical Practice Recommendations 6 Clinical Practice Recommendations and Practice Points 7 Summary of Evidence - Methodology 21 Summary of Evidence - Introduction 23 Summary of Evidence - Vasomotor symptoms 24 Vasomotor symptoms: Pharmacological interventions 25 Vasomotor symptoms: Hormonal interventions 27 Vasomotor symptoms: Psychological and physical interventions 29 Vasomotor symptoms: Complementary therapies 32 Summary of Evidence - Sleep disturbance 33 Sleep disturbance: Pharmacological (...) interventions 34 Sleep disturbance: Hormonal interventions 35 Sleep disturbance: Psychological and physical interventions 36 Sleep disturbance: Complementary therapies 38 Summary of Evidence - Vulvovaginal symptoms and sexual function 39 Vulvovaginal symptoms and sexual function: Pharmacological interventions 40 Vulvovaginal symptoms and sexual function: Hormonal interventions 41 Vulvovaginal symptoms and sexual function: Psychological and physical interventions 43 Vulvovaginal symptoms and sexual function

2017 Cancer Australia

162. End of life care for infants, children and young people with life-limiting conditions: planning and management

decisions using NICE guidelines explains how we use words to show the strength of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off-label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding. In this guideline: 'Children and young people' refers to everyone under 18 years old. This includes neonates and infants. 'Parents or carers' refers to the people with parental responsibility for a child or young person (...) if they are not having treatment for it. 1.3.25 Think about non-pharmacological interventions for pain management, such as: changes that may help them to relax, for example: environmental adjustments (for example reducing noise) music physical contact such as touch, holding or massage local hot or cold applications to the site of pain comfort measures, such as sucrose for neonates. 1.3.26 When tailoring pain treatment for an individual child or young person, take into account their views and those of their parents

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

163. HIV testing: increasing uptake among people who may have undiagnosed HIV (Joint NICE and Public Health England guideline)

medicines (including off-label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding. 1.1 Offering and recommending HIV testing in different settings L Local pre ocal prevalence valence 1.1.1 Offer and recommend HIV testing based on local prevalence and how it affects different groups and communities. Use Public Health England's sexual and reproductive health profiles and local data to establish: local HIV prevalence, including whether an area has (...) high prevalence or extremely high prevalence rates of HIV in different groups and communities. [new 2016] [new 2016] Specialist se Specialist sexual health services (including genitourinary medicine xual health services (including genitourinary medicine) ) 1.1.2 Offer and recommend an HIV test to everyone who attends for testing or treatment. [2011, amended 2016] [2011, amended 2016] 1.1.3 Ensure both fourth-generation serological testing and point-of-care testing (POCT) are available. [2011

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

164. Coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse: community health and social care services

to secondary care mental health services and dual diagnosis services. Substance misuse Substance misuse Substance misuse refers to the use of legal or illicit drugs, including alcohol and medicine, in a way that causes mental or physical damage. This may include low levels of substance use that would not usually be considered harmful or problematic, but may have a significant effect on the mental health of people with a mental illness such as psychosis. [1] The Care Programme Approach is a way (...) psychotic episodes. Substance misuse refers to the use of legal or illicit drugs, including alcohol and medicine, in a way that causes mental or physical damage. Coexisting severe mental illness and substance misuse: community health and social care services (NG58) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 23 of 60More information You can also see this guideline in the NICE pathway on coexisting severe mental

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

165. Guidelines on HIV self-testing and partner notification

Francois Venter + (Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa) and Vincent Wong + (United States Agency for International Development (USAID), USA). HIV Self-Testing Technical Working Group Nicola Desmond (Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Malawi Wellcome Trust, Malawi), Jane Ferguson (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine – Africa Centre, South Africa), Kimberly Green (PATH, Viet Nam), Karin Hatzold (Population Services International (...) of Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom). + Denotes individuals who were also on the HIV Self-Testing Technical Working Group. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSvii Acknowledgements External contributors to the GRADE systematic review Virginia Fonner (Medical University of South Carolina, USA), Caitlin Kennedy (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA) and Nandi Siegfried (independent clinical epidemiologist, South Africa). External contributors to supporting evidence Florence Anam, Margaret Happy (International

2016 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

166. Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s: assessment and management

and sciatica in over 16s: assessment and management (NG59) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 18This guideline replaces CG88. This guideline is the basis of QS155. Ov Overview erview This guideline covers assessing and managing low back pain and sciatica in people aged 16 and over. It outlines physical, psychological, pharmacological and surgical treatments to help people manage their low back pain (...) -of-rights). Page 4 of 18Recommendations Recommendations People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed decisions about their care, as described in your care. Making decisions using NICE guidelines explains how we use words to show the strength (or certainty) of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off-label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding. 1.1 Assessment of low

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

167. Use of multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by infants and young children aged 6?23 months and children aged 2?12 years

is considered to be fairly common, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Multiple vitamin and mineral deficiencies frequently occur simultaneously and their joint effects during the critical period from preconception to 23 months of age may be associated with irreversible physical and cognitive consequences and increased neonatal mortality and morbidity (14–16), leading to lifelong detrimental consequences on health, productivity and economic growth. It has been estimated that nutritional risk

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

168. Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use

, China). Evidence Secretariat Duke University, USA – Remy Coeytaux Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA – Tara Jatlaoui, Kathryn Curtis, Halley Riley, Naomi Tepper University of North Carolina, USA – Rachel Peragallo Urrutia Partners European Medicines Agency (EMA) – Peter Arlett, Corinne de Vries, Julie Williams International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) – Maria Papadopoulou International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) – Hamid Rushwan United Nations Population (...) (East European Institute for Reproductive Health, Romania), Rafat Jan (Agha Khan University, Pakistan), Isaac Malonza (Jhpiego, Kenya), John Pile (UNFPA, Timor-Leste). WHO Secretariat WHO headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products – Nicola Magrini Department of HIV – Rachel Baggaley Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention – Alarcos Cieza Department of Reproductive Health and Research – Moazzam Ali

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

169. Fortification of maize flour and corn meal with vitamins and minerals

or yellow maize flour, and how much of each nutrient to use, should be based on the nutritional needs and intake gaps of the target populations; the usual level of consumption of maize flour, corn meal and products made from these staples; the sensory and physical effects of the fortificant on white and yellow maize flour, corn meal and flour products; the fortification of other food vehicles; the population use of vitamin and mineral supplements; costs; feasibility; and acceptability. Maize flour can (...) ; the sensory and physical effects of the fortificant on white and yellow maize flour, corn meal and flour products; the fortification of other food vehicles; the population use of vitamin and mineral supplements; other ongoing nutrition interventions; costs; feasibility; and acceptability. • Since some of the B-complex vitamins naturally present in the maize grain are removed during milling and degerming, the restoration of niacin, riboflavin and thiamine in maize flour should remain a regular practice

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

170. WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience

to the complex nature of the issues surrounding the practice and delivery of ANC, and to prioritize person-centred health and well-being – not only the prevention of death and morbidity – in accordance with a human rights-based approach. The scope of this guideline was informed by a systematic review of women’s views, which shows that women want a positive pregnancy experience from ANC. A positive pregnancy experience is defined as maintaining physical and sociocultural normality, maintaining a healthy (...) of WHO recommendations on antenatal care (ANC) for a positive pregnancy experience These recommendations apply to pregnant women and adolescent girls within the context of routine ANC A. Nutritional interventions Recommendation Type of recommendation Dietary interventions A.1.1: Counselling about healthy eating and keeping physically active during pregnancy is recommended for pregnant women to stay healthy and to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. a Recommended A.1.2: In undernourished

2016 World Health Organisation Guidelines

171. Common Principles of Rehabilitation for Adults in Audiology Services

, diagnosis and management of the hearing impairment (i.e. function). Functional domains for potential activity limitations and participation restrictions include understanding spoken information, conversation, recreation and leisure, education and employment. The Action Plan, like the ICF, also highlights the influence of contextual factors on sensory impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions. Contextual factors make up the physical, social and attitudinal setting in which people (...) as much as diagnosing impairments (Mulley et al. 2012). UK commissioners of hearing services are frequently unaware of patient preferences, prioritising clinicians’ report on hearing healthcare needs (Mulley et al. 2012) 4.4 Supporting self-management Self-management occurs when the individual takes responsibility for their own behaviour and well- being. For long-term conditions, this refers to management of symptoms, interventions or treatment, and physical and psychosocial consequences alongside

2016 British Society of Audiology

172. Treatment of HIV-1-positive adults with antiretroviral therapy (interim update)

or will be undertaken to disseminate and aid implementation of the guidelines: ? E-publication on the BHIVA website and the journal HIV Medicine. ? Publication in HIV Medicine. ? Shortened version detailing concise summary of recommendations. ? Shortened version for BHIVA guidelines app. ? E-learning module accredited for CME. ? Educational slide set to support local and regional educational meetings. ? National BHIVA audit programme. 1.2.6 Guideline updates and date of next review The guidelines will be next fully (...) should improve the physical and psychological well-being of PLWH. The effectiveness and tolerability of ART has improved significantly over the last 15 years. The overwhelming majority of PLWH attending HIV services in the UK and receiving ART experience long-term virological suppression and good treatment outcomes [5], which compare very favourably with other developed countries. Notably, in 2013 around 90% of those diagnosed with HIV in the UK had initiated ART, with 93% of those on ART having

2017 British HIV Association

173. WHO guidelines for the treatment of Genital Herpes Simplex Virus

(GDG) 12 2.2 Questions and outcomes 12 2.3 Reviews of the evidence 12 2.4 Making recommendations 13 2.5 Management of conflicts of interest 14 3. Dissemination, updating and implementation of the guidelines 15 3.1 Dissemination 15 3.2 Updating the STI guidelines and user feedback 15 3.3 Implementation of the WHO guidelines for the treatment of genital herpes simplex virus 15 Adaptation, implementation and monitoring 15 Identifying and procuring STI medicines 16 4. Recommendations for treatment (...) not be possible during the course of treatment and symptoms of the first clinical episode may be prolonged, therapy is provided for 10 days. Although the benefits of the medicines are probably similar, the costs of valaciclovir and famciclovir are higher than aciclovir, and therefore aciclovir is preferred. The choice of medicine may also depend on compliance considerations. This recommendation also applies to people living with HIV, people who are immunocompromised, people with a severe episode and pregnant

2016 World Health Organisation Guidelines

175. Validation and qualification, including change control, for hospital transfusion laboratories

Validation and qualification, including change control, for hospital transfusion laboratories Guidelines for validation and qualification, including change control, for hospital transfusion laboratories* - - 2012 - Transfusion Medicine - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Free Access (...) ) Guidelines for the Validation of Automated Systems in Blood Establishments ( ) • ISPE. Good Automated Manufacturing Practice (GAMP 5) ( ) • Pharmaceutical Inspection Co‐operation Scheme PIC/S. GMP Guide for Blood Establishments ( ) • European Commission Working Party on Control of Medicines and Inspections Final Version of Annex 15 to the EU Guide to Good Manufacturing Practice (2001) As there are many terms and abbreviations/acronyms used in this guideline which the reader may be unfamiliar with, we

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2012 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

176. Management of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease

Department of Haematological Medicine, King's College Hospital, London, UK Department of Haematology, Whittington Hospital, London, UK on behalf of Corresponding Author Department of Haematology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Correspondence: Jo Howard, Department of Haematology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. E‐mail: Lane Fox Respiratory Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Department of Haematology, North (...) Middlesex Hospital, London, UK Department of Paediatric Haematology, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, London, UK Department of Haematological Medicine, King's College Hospital, London, UK Department of Haematology, Whittington Hospital, London, UK on behalf of First published: 30 March 2015 Cited by: Give access Share full text access Please review our and check box below to share full-text version of article. I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Shareable

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2015 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

177. Management of anaemia and red cell transfusion in adult critically ill patients

for the Administration of Blood Components (Harris et al , ). In critically ill patients, transfusion‐associated lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion‐associated circulatory overload (TACO) are particularly relevant complications (Dara et al , ; Rana et al , ; Gajic et al , , ; Khan et al , ). Any adverse events or reactions related to transfusion should be appropriately investigated and reported to local risk management, the Serious Hazards of Transfusion group (SHOT) and the Medicines and Healthcare products

2012 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

178. Management of primary resistant and relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

on the management of primary resistant and relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma Department of Haematology, Oxford Cancer and Haematology Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK HPC Transplant Programme, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK Department of Haematology, East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust, Canterbury, UK Department of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, London, UK Department of Haematology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK Institute (...) College London, London, UK Correspondence: Dr Karl S. Peggs, Department of Haematology, UCL Cancer Institute, London WC1E6BT, UK. E‐mail: on behalf of Department of Haematology, Oxford Cancer and Haematology Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK HPC Transplant Programme, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK Department of Haematology, East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust, Canterbury, UK Department of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, London, UK Department

2013 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

179. Management of AL amyloidosis

Management of AL amyloidosis Guidelines on the management of AL amyloidosis - Wechalekar - 2015 - British Journal of Haematology - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Guideline Free Access Guidelines on the management of AL amyloidosis Corresponding Author Division of Medicine, National (...) Amyloidosis Centre, UCL, London, UK Correspondence: BCSH Secretary, British Society for Haematology, 100 White Lion Street, London N1 9PF, UK. E‐mail: Division of Medicine, National Amyloidosis Centre, UCL, London, UK Department of Haematology, Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, Bristol, UK Department of Haematology, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK Department of Haematology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK Departments of Oncology and Haematology

2014 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

180. Patient self-testing and self-management of oral anti-coagulants with vitamin K antagonists

‐testing has been reported by the Medicines and Health Regulatory Agency (MHRA, ). Discussion should take place between patients and healthcare professionals overseeing their care regarding choice of device. Reliability of POCT INR results Several point‐of‐care devices have been shown to give reliable and accurate INR values when compared to traditional laboratory methods (NHS) Purchasing and Supply Agency, ; Christensen & Larsen, ), although many of these evaluations were performed by healthcare (...) , ). Dolor et al ( ) evaluated ability to PST and demonstrated competency in 80% of subjects. However, in other studies over 50% of patients were excluded because of physical limitations, inability to demonstrate competence with POCT devices, apprehension about self‐care, or patient refusal (Bloomfield et al , ). The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines (Holbrook et al , ) recommend PSM for patients who are motivated and can demonstrate competency in self‐management strategies

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2014 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

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