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161. Compounded Bioidentical Menopausal Hormone Therapy

: an analysis of ethical issues. Menopause 2008;15:1014–22. Boothby LA, Doering PL, Kipersztok S. Bioidentical hormone therapy: a review. Menopause 2004;11:356–67. Drisko JA. “Natural” isomolecular hormone replacement: an evidence-based medicine approach. Int J Pharmaceut Compounding 2000;4:414–20. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA takes action against compounded menopause hormone therapy drugs. Silver Spring (MD): FDA; 2008. Available at: . Retrieved February 15, 2012. U.S. Food and Drug (...) hormone therapy compared with FDA-approved conventional hormone therapy include greater dosage flexibility, availability of low-dose preparations, and potential lower cost. The practice of custom blending commercially available drug products may lack both a strong biological rationale and medical evidence for effectiveness. Moreover, it introduces the possibility of multiple sources for drug effects and adverse effects, making it difficult to identify the active agent responsible. For these reasons

2012 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

162. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Nonpharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients

of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Ms Volsko is affiliated with Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, Ohio. Mr Branson is affiliated with the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr Hess is affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Dr Rubin has disclosed relationships with GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, InspiRx, Fisher & Paykel, Teleflex, Philips Respironics, Novartis, Electromed, and Salter Labs. Ms O’Malley has disclosed relationships (...) . The efficacy of the mucociliary esca- lator is impaired by aging, tobacco use, environmental exposures, and disorders such as bronchiectasis. 3-5 Neuro- degenerative conditions decrease the ability to cough ef- fectively, leading to secretion retention. 6-10 Airway clearance therapy (ACT), performed by respi- ratory therapists and other healthcare providers, is intended to aid secretion mobilization and expectoration, and to mitigate complications associated with secretion retention. ACT uses physical

2013 American Association for Respiratory Care

163. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy Guideline

Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy Guideline 1 Purpose: The purpose of this guideline is to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiotherapy after prostatectomy in patients with and without evidence of prostate cancer recurrence. Methods: A systematic review of the literature using the Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane databases (search dates 1/1/90 to 12/15/12) was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiotherapy after prostatectomy (...) . Additional information is provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinion when insufficient evidence existed. See text for definitions and detailed information. GUIDELINE STATEMENTS 1. Patients who are being considered for management of localized prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy should be informed of the potential for adverse pathologic findings that portend a higher risk of cancer recurrence and that these findings may suggest a potential benefit of additional therapy after surgery

2013 American Society for Radiation Oncology

164. Long-term Cardiovascular Toxicity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Who Receive Cancer Therapy: Pathophysiology, Course, Monitoring, Management, Prevention, and Research Directions (Full text)

. By interfering with these channels, drugs slow potassium ion entry into the myocyte and thereby prolong repolarization. Additional mechanisms may also be involved, because not all drugs that impede HERG potassium channel activity induce QT prolongation. Both adults and children with cancer may be more susceptible to QT prolongation because of comorbid conditions, disease-related electrolyte disturbances, or concomitant treatment with potentially proarrhythmic medications. Anthracyclines. Anthracyclines (...) ). An innate functional reserve allows the heart to endure a certain degree of myocyte loss. Cardiac dysfunction occurs when the capacity for reserve compensatory activity is exceeded. Diminished myocardial contractility is a clinical challenge to continued effective cancer therapy. Anthracycline Antibiotics (Doxorubicin). Anthracyclines are the best-known class of chemotherapeutic drugs associated with cardiotoxicity. These agents (especially doxorubicin) have long been an important component of therapy

2013 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

165. SNMMI Procedure Standard for Therapy of Thyroid Disease with 131I (Sodium Iodide) 3.0

disease after near-total thyroidectomy). V. QUALIFICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF PERSONNEL (IN THE UNITED STATES) See also the SNM Guideline for General Imaging. The SNM believes that training and experience accord- ing to the nuclear medicine program requirements of the THERAPY OF THYROID DISEASE WITH 131 I ? Silberstein et al. 3 jnm105148-sn n 7/11/12Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (11), or the equivalent, are necessary for physicians to pro- vide appropriate and effective (...) therapy. The consent form should include TABLE 1 Pharmaceuticals Blocking Radioiodine Uptake Type of medication Recommended time of withdrawal Thionamide medications (e.g., propylthiouracil, methimazole carbimazole) 3d Multivitamins containing iodide 7–10 d Natural or synthetic thyroid hormones 10–14 d for triiodothyronine 3–4 wk for thyroxine Kelp, agar, carrageenan, Lugol solution 2–3 wk, depending on iodide content Saturated solution of potassium iodide 2–3wk Topical iodine (e.g., surgical skin

2012 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

166. Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association with Cervical Manipulative Therapy

that they seek therapy for this symptom from providers, including CMT prac- titioners, and that the V AD occurs spontaneously, implying that the association between CMT and VAD/vertebrobasilar artery stroke is not causal. It is also plausible that CMT could exac- erbate the symptoms or the V AD and possibly increase the risk of stroke. Therefore, in the setting of neck pain or headache with focal neurological symptoms after any minor trauma, including CMT, immediate medical evaluation for possible stroke (...) Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association with Cervical Manipulative Therapy 3155 Purpose—Cervical artery dissections (CDs) are among the most common causes of stroke in young and middle-aged adults. The aim of this scientific statement is to review the current state of evidence on the diagnosis and management of CDs and their statistical association with cervical manipulative therapy (CMT). In some forms of CMT, a high or low amplitude thrust is applied to the cervical spine

2014 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

167. Role of Adjuvant Therapy in the Management of Early Stage Cervical Cancer

and Gynecologists. 4 Co-Author University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, American Society of Clinical Oncology. 5 Panel Vice-chair, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana. 6 Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan. 7 Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 8 University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. 9 University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 10 Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California. 11 Brigham and Women's (...) Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. 12 UW Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. 13 Stritch School of Medicine Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois. 14 University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska. 15 University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. 16 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. 17 Panel Chair, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. The American College

2014 American College of Radiology

168. The Joint IAEA, EANM, and SNMMI Practical Guidance on Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRNT) in Neuroendocrine Tumors

of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka, Germany M. S. O’Dorisio RJ and LA Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA T. M. O’Dorisiol RJ and LA Carver College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA J. R. Howe RJ and LA Carver College of Medicine, Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA M. Cremonesi Service of Health Physics (...) , European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy D. J. Kwekkeboom Department of Nuclear Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging (2013) 40:800–816 DOI 10.1007/s00259-012-2330-6protective measures are undertaken. Despite the large body of evidence regarding efficacy and clinical safety, PRRNTis still consideredaninvestigationaltreatmentanditsimplementation must comply with national legislation, and ethical guidelines concerning human therapeutic

2013 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

169. Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient

in patients in a medical ICU (conditional recom- mendation, very low level of evidence). Monitoring tolerance and adequacy of enteral nutrition Question: How should adequacy and tolerance of enteral nutrition be assessed in the hospitalized patient? Recommendations: 19a. Hospitalized patients on EN should be monitored daily by physical exam (conditional recommendation, very low level of evidence). 19b. Patients on EN should be monitored for adequacy of provision of EN as a percent of target goal calories (...) Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient nature publishing group 1 © 2016 by the American College of Gastroenterology The American Journal of GASTROENTEROLOGY PRACTICE GUIDELINES INTRODUCTION Th e modern era of clinical nutrition began with the develop- ment of total parenteral nutrition (PN) by Dudrick ( 1 ) in 1966, suggesting for the fi rst time that clinicians could compensate for intestinal failure with the potential to supply nutrients to any hospitalized patient. Further

2016 American College of Gastroenterology

170. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Sup... : Critical Care Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account (...) my selection doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000001525 Special Article Free Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text. 1 Nutrition Support Specialist, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO. 2 Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY. 3 Chief Division of General Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR. 4 Critical Care Dietitian, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR. 5 Clinical Nurse Specialist: Wound, Skin, Ostomy, UW Health University

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

171. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Volume 40 Issue 8 Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition pages: 1200-1200 First Published online: September 15, 2016 Corresponding Author E-mail address: Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky Beth Taylor and Steven McClave are co–first authors of this article. Stephen A. McClave, MD (...) , Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY. Email: Charlene Compher, RD, PhD, Professor of Nutrition Science, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Email: Nutrition Support Specialist, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri Beth Taylor and Steven McClave are co–first authors of this article. Chief Division of General Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon Critical Care Dietitian, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

172. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient (Full text)

is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Clinical Guideline Free Access Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Corresponding Author E-mail address: Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Nilesh M. Mehta (...) , Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA Division of Critical Care, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Section of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA Division of Nutrition Therapy, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Department of Pharmacy, Betty H. Cameron Women's and Children's Hospital, New Hanover

2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition PubMed abstract

173. Gaba Transcatheter Therapy for Hepatic Malignancy: Standardization of Terminology

and clinicians practicing interventional oncology by providing a common language to describe transcatheter therapies and outcomes. CLASSIFICATION OF THERAPIES Image-Guided Transcatheter Tumor Therapy The term “image-guided transcatheter tumor therapy” is de?ned as the intravascular delivery of therapeutic agents via selective catheter placement with imaging guidance for the treatment of malignancy. Currently, various devices—such as embolic or drug-eluting particles, chemotherapeutic medications (...) .), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (B.J.d.O.), Uni- versity of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (S.A.P.), University of Washing- ton, Seattle, Washington; Division of Interventional Radiology (D.S.W.), Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California; Department of Radiology (B.N

2016 Society of Interventional Radiology

174. Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications (Full text)

, mural, infection, diagnosis, bacteremia, case definition, epidemiology, risks, demographics, injection drug use, echocardiography, microbiology, culture-negative, therapy, antibiotic, antifungal, antimicrobial, antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug effects, drug monitoring, outcome, meta-analysis, complications, abscess, heart failure, embolic events, stroke, conduction abnormalities, survival, pathogens, organisms, treatment, surgery, indications, valve replacement, valve repair, ambulatory care (...) bacteremia or fungemia, evidence of active valvulitis, peripheral emboli, and immunological vascular phenomena. In most patients, however, the “textbook” history and physical examination findings may be few or absent. Cases with limited manifestations of IE may occur early during IE, particularly among patients who are injection drug users (IDUs), in whom IE is often the result of acute S aureus infection of right-sided heart valves. Acute IE may evolve too quickly for the development of immunological

2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America PubMed abstract

175. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer (Full text)

are the appropriate assays, timing, and frequency of measurement? Target Population Women with metastatic breast cancer being considered for systemic therapy or for changes in the drug or regimen they are receiving. Target Audience Any physician caring for patients with breast cancer, including medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists; oncology nurses and physician assistants, pathologists, and patients. Methods An Expert Panel was convened to develop clinical practice guideline recommendations based (...) have demonstrated clinical utility to initiate systemic therapy or direct selection of a new systemic therapy regimen? For women with metastatic breast cancer and with known ER, PR, and HER2 status, which additional tumor markers have demonstrated clinical utility to guide decisions on switching to a different drug or regimen or discontinuing treatment? For biomarkers shown to have clinical utility to guide decisions on systemic therapy for metastatic disease in questions 2 and 3, what

2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines PubMed abstract

176. Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association With Cervical Manipulative Therapy (Full text)

by members of the allopathic, osteopathic, and physical therapy/physiotherapy professions. According to the 2007 US statistics on alternative medicine, at least 38% of US adults and 12% of children use some form of alternative medicine, including chiropractic and osteopathic manipulations, mainly for back, neck, and joint pain. The chiropractic profession is common in the United States, Canada, and Australia but less so elsewhere. Chiropractic is the largest alternative medical profession in the United (...) studies, published since this systematic review, investigated the effects of cervical manipulation on neck pain. Bronfort et al found that cervical manipulation, together with other physical interventions, was as effective as a home exercise program and that each was more effective than treatment with ≥1 of the following: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, muscle relaxants, and narcotics. Dunning et al compared cervical and thoracic thrust manipulation with cervical and thoracic

2014 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

177. ASGE Position Statement: endoscopic bariatric therapies in clinical practice

effective, with 5% to 10% total body weight loss at 1 year. 15-17 Weight regain oc- curs after 1 year, but some health bene?ts do persist. 16,18-20 Medications currently approved for long-term treatment of obesity include orlistat (Xenical/Alli; GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC), lorcaserin (Belviq; Eisai, Woodcliff Lake, NJ), phentermine/topiramate combination (Qsymia; VIVUS, Mountain View, Calif), naltrexone/bupro- pion combination (Contrave; Takeda Pharmaceutical, La Jolla, Calif (...) ), and liraglutide (Saxenda; Novo Nordisk, Plains- boro Township, NJ). Weight loss medications in combina- tion with moderate intensity lifestyle intervention yields 4.5% to 11% total body weight loss (TBWL). 10,21,22 Side ef- fects do occur, but weight loss medications are generally well tolerated. 10,21,22 Guidelines on the pharmacological management of obesity by the Endocrine Society were pub- lished in January 2015. 23 With the exception of orlistat, the obesity drugs approved for long-term use have only

2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

178. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015

; 3 Atlanta, GA; 4 Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD; 5 American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Darien, IL; 6 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI ABSTRACT Introduction: Since the previous parameter and review paper publication on oral appliances (OAs) in 2006, the relevant scientific literature has grown considerably, particularly in relation to clinical outcomes. The purpose of this new guideline is to replace the previous and update recommendations for the use of OAs (...) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring with oral appliance therapy: an update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):773–827. SUMMARY Since the publication of the initial position statement by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) in 1995, the clinical use of oral appliances (OAs) for the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has markedly increased. The most recent AASM practice parameters on the treatment of snoring and OSA with oral appliances was published in 2006

2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

179. MASCC/ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Mucositis Secondary to Cancer Therapy

mucositis in patients receiving H&NRT. No guideline was possible regarding theuseoforalcareprotocolsforthetreatmentoforalmuco- sitis. In addition, no guideline was possible related to the individualuseofthefollowingmouthrinses:saline,sodium bicarbonate, mixed medication mouthwashes, calcium phosphate, and chlorhexidine in patients receiving chemo- therapy,duetoinadequateand=orconflictingevidence. 31 Growth factors and cytokines To the best of our knowledge, palifermin (keratinocyte growthfactor-1 (...) )istheonlyagentthathasbeenapproved as a drug by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for oral mucositis. Evi- dence included a large, well-designed, randomized con- trolled trial and other supporting studies. 32 The previous versionoftheMASCC=ISOOguidelinesfororalmucosi- tis included a recommendation in favor of this agent for the prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation fol- lowedbyautologousstemcelltransplantationforhemato- logical

2014 International Society for Oral Oncology

180. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients

):726-732; discussion 732. 57. RestrepoRD.Inhaledadrenergicsandanticholinergicsinobstructive lung disease: do they enhance mucociliary clearance? Respir Care 2007;52(9):1159-1173; discussion 1173-1175. 58. Rubin BK. Mucolytics, expectorants, and mucokinetic medications. Respir Care 2007;52(7):859-865. 59. Rubin BK. Pediatric aerosol therapy: new devices and new drugs. Respir Care 2011;56(9):1411-1421; discussion 1421-1423. 60. Judson MA, Chaudhry H, Compa DR, O’Donnell AE. A Delphi (...) Airwayclearancedependsonciliarybeatcoordinationand power, cough peak flow, and the bulk and surface prop- ertiesofsecretions. 4 Variousaerosolizedmedicationshave been used to improve airway clearance by altering mucus biophysical properties. Recommending and administering medications for air- way clearance therapy are within the respiratory thera- pist’s scope of practice. Therapy should be matched to the patient’s disease and therapy goals. The potential harmful effectsassociatedwithmedicationuseandthecostofcare are also important

2015 American Association for Respiratory Care

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