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1. Interventions for recurrent idiopathic epistaxis (nosebleeds) in children. (Abstract)

Interventions for recurrent idiopathic epistaxis (nosebleeds) in children. Recurrent idiopathic epistaxis (nosebleeds) in children is repeated nasal bleeding in patients up to the age of 16 for which no specific cause has been identified. Although nosebleeds are very common in children, and most cases are self limiting or settle with simple measures (such as pinching the nose), more severe recurrent cases can require treatment from a healthcare professional. However, there is no consensus (...) on the effectiveness of the different clinical interventions currently used in managing this condition.To assess the effects of different interventions for the management of recurrent idiopathic epistaxis in children.We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials

2012 Cochrane

2. How we do it: Anterior and posterior nose bleed trainer, the 3D printing epistaxis project. (Abstract)

How we do it: Anterior and posterior nose bleed trainer, the 3D printing epistaxis project. 27455169 2019 02 04 2019 02 15 1749-4486 43 2 2018 04 Clinical otolaryngology : official journal of ENT-UK ; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery Clin Otolaryngol How we do it: anterior and posterior nosebleed trainer, the 3D printing epistaxis project. 765-766 10.1111/coa.12711 Chiesa Estomba C M CM Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (...) Department, University Hospital of Vigo, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain. González Fernández I I Biomedical Engineering, DQbito Biomedical Engineering, Ourense, Spain. Iglesias Otero M Á MÁ Biomedical Engineering, DQbito Biomedical Engineering, Ourense, Spain. eng Journal Article 2016 08 08 England Clin Otolaryngol 101247023 1749-4478 IM Epistaxis diagnosis etiology therapy Humans Models, Anatomic Printing, Three-Dimensional Simulation Training 2016 07 14 2016 7 28 6 0 2019 2 5 6 0 2016 7 26 6 0 ppublish

2016 Clinical Otolaryngology

3. Nasal powders of thalidomide for local treatment of nose bleeding in persons affected by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Nasal powders of thalidomide for local treatment of nose bleeding in persons affected by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia In this work nasal powder formulations of thalidomide were designed and studied to be used by persons affected by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia as a complementary anti-epistaxis therapy, with the goal of sustaining the effect obtained with thalidomide oral treatment after its discontinuation for adverse effects. Three nasal powders were prepared using (...) in vitro suggests a low likelihood of significant systemic absorption. The topical action on bleeding could benefit from the poor absorption and from the fact that about 2-3% of the thalidomide applied on the nasal mucosa was accumulated within the tissue, particularly with the β-CD nasal powder.Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2016 International journal of pharmaceutics

4. Should Avamys be stopped if it causes nose bleeds or just witheld for a period, especially if when it is used symptoms of nasal congestion and snoring do improve?

that of placebo (Table 2), and most episodes are mild and transient. Epistaxis is common in the general population: the incidence of nasal bleeding not related to medication ranged from 7.6% in a 12-month study of 3500 mature women (50-64 years of age) to 15.8% (minor recurrent nosebleeds) in a survey of 4538 US households. A recent audit of INC use in a rhinitis clinic in the United Kingdom indicated a real-world incidence of epistaxis of 9% among 126 patients using INCs for 3 months. Epistaxis may (...) Should Avamys be stopped if it causes nose bleeds or just witheld for a period, especially if when it is used symptoms of nasal congestion and snoring do improve? Should Avamys be stopped if it causes nose bleeds or just witheld for a period, especially if when it is used symptoms of nasal congestion and snoring do improve? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere

2014 TRIP Answers

5. Epistaxis (nosebleeds)

Epistaxis (nosebleeds) Epistaxis (nosebleeds) - NICE CKS Share Epistaxis (nosebleeds): Summary Epistaxis is bleeding from the nose, caused by damage to the blood vessels of the nasal mucosa. Most epistaxis is self-limiting and harmless, and often the cause of damage to the blood vessels is not identified. Local causes of damage to the blood vessels include trauma, inflammation, topical drugs (such as corticosteroids), surgery, vascular causes (such as hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (...) . In most cases (80–95%), epistaxis originates from Little's area on the anterior nasal septum, which contains the Kiesselbach plexus of vessels. Less commonly, epistaxis originates from branches of the sphenopalatine artery in the posterior nasal cavity. Posterior nosebleeds usually occur in older people, are more profuse, result in bleeding from both nostrils, and the bleeding site cannot be identified on examination. [ ; ; ; ; ] Causes What causes it? Blood vessels inside the nose are superficial

2015 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

6. 'How to stop a nosebleed': an assessment of the quality of epistaxis treatment advice on YouTube. (Abstract)

'How to stop a nosebleed': an assessment of the quality of epistaxis treatment advice on YouTube. Video hosting websites are increasingly being used to disseminate health education messages. This study aimed to assess the quality of advice contained within YouTube videos on the conservative management of epistaxis.YouTube.com was searched using the phrase 'how to stop a nosebleed'. The first 50 videos were screened. Objective advice scores and subjective production quality scores were (...) attributed by independent raters.Forty-five videos were analysed. The mean advice score was 2.0 out of 8 and the mean production quality score was 1.6 out of 3. There were no correlations between a video's advice score and its search results rank (ρ = -0.28, p = 0.068), its view count (ρ = 0.20, p = 0.19) or its number of 'likes' (ρ = 0.21, p = 0.18).The quality of information on conservative epistaxis management within YouTube videos is extremely variable. A high search rank is no indication of video

2016 Journal of Laryngology & Otology

7. 7-day weighed food diaries suggest patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may spontaneously modify their diet to avoid nosebleed precipitants Full Text available with Trip Pro

of 25 UK patients with HHT whose nosebleeds ranged from mild to severe (median epistaxis severity score 4.66, range 0.89- 9.11). The diaries provide evidence that food items most commonly reported to provoke nosebleeds were ingested by fewer HHT patients, compared to food items less commonly reported to provoke nosebleeds (chi-squared p <0.001). (...) 7-day weighed food diaries suggest patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may spontaneously modify their diet to avoid nosebleed precipitants Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) poses substantial burdens due to nosebleeds and iron deficiency resulting from recurrent hemorrhagic iron losses. Recent studies by our group found surprising links between HHT nosebleeds and certain food groups. In this letter, we report 7-day weighed food diary assessments of an unselected group

2017 Orphanet journal of rare diseases

8. Embolisation of PAVMs reported to improve nosebleeds by a subgroup of patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Embolisation of PAVMs reported to improve nosebleeds by a subgroup of patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia Pulmonary AVM embolisation appears to improve nosebleed severity for nearly one in six people with HHT http://ow.ly/4mJqip.

2016 ERJ open research

9. Mycobacterium gordonae in Patient with Facial Ulcers, Nosebleeds, and Positive T-SPOT.TB Test, China. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mycobacterium gordonae in Patient with Facial Ulcers, Nosebleeds, and Positive T-SPOT.TB Test, China. Mycobacterium gordonae is often regarded as a weak pathogen that only occasionally causes overt disease. We report a case of M. gordonae infection in the facial skin, nasal mucosa, and paranasal sinus in an immunocompetent patient and review previous cases. The T-SPOT.TB test might be useful in diagnosing such cases.

2017 Emerging Infectious Diseases

10. Nose-bleeding and High Blood Pressure Full Text available with Trip Pro

Nose-bleeding and High Blood Pressure 13608070 2000 07 01 2018 12 01 0007-1447 1 5113 1959 Jan 03 British medical journal Br Med J Nose-bleeding and high blood pressure. 25-7 MITCHELL J R JR eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 OM Epistaxis Humans Hypertension Nose 5935:37717:203:281 EPISTAXIS HYPERTENSION 1959 1 3 1959 1 3 0 1 1959 1 3 0 0 ppublish 13608070 PMC1992321 Clin Sci (Lond). 1954 Feb;13(1):37-49 13141422

1959 British medical journal

11. Bleeding from the Nose and Throat Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bleeding from the Nose and Throat 21312536 2011 03 30 2011 03 30 0032-5473 3 29 1928 Feb Postgraduate medical journal Postgrad Med J Bleeding from the Nose and Throat. 73-8 Thomson S S eng Journal Article England Postgrad Med J 0234135 0032-5473 2011 2 12 6 0 1928 2 1 0 0 1928 2 1 0 1 ppublish 21312536 PMC2531549

1928 Postgraduate medical journal

12. Bleeding Polypus of the Nose Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bleeding Polypus of the Nose 19987963 2010 06 24 2010 06 24 0035-9157 24 4 1931 Feb Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. Bleeding Polypus of the Nose. 445-6 Asherson N N eng Journal Article England Proc R Soc Med 7505890 0035-9157 2009 12 9 6 0 1931 2 1 0 0 1931 2 1 0 1 ppublish 19987963 PMC2182741

1931 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

13. Editorial: Coping with nose-bleeds. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Editorial: Coping with nose-bleeds. 4816849 1974 05 17 2018 11 13 0007-1447 1 5905 1974 Mar 09 British medical journal Br Med J Editorial: Coping with nose-bleeds. 405-6 eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 AIM IM Adolescent Arteriosclerosis complications Cautery Child Epistaxis etiology therapy Humans Hypertension complications Ligation Nose blood supply Occlusive Dressings Pressure 1974 3 9 1974 3 9 0 1 1974 3 9 0 0 ppublish 4816849 PMC1633245 J Laryngol Otol. 1973 Sep;87(9

1974 British medical journal

14. Letter: Coping with nose-bleeds. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Letter: Coping with nose-bleeds. 4824933 1974 06 26 2013 11 21 0007-1447 2 5910 1974 Apr 13 British medical journal Br Med J Letter: Coping with nose-bleeds. 118-9 eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 76I7G6D29C Morphine 95IT3W8JZE Silver Nitrate Q3JTX2Q7TU Diazepam AIM IM Adult Aged Bandages Cardiovascular Diseases complications Cautery Child Cold Temperature Diazepam therapeutic use Epistaxis drug therapy etiology therapy Humans Middle Aged Morphine therapeutic use

1974 British medical journal

15. Letter: Coping with nose-bleeds. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Letter: Coping with nose-bleeds. 4832248 1974 07 30 2013 11 21 0007-1447 2 5912 1974 Apr 27 British medical journal Br Med J Letter: Coping with nose-bleeds. 224 eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Aminocaproates AIM IM Aminocaproates therapeutic use Catheterization Epistaxis therapy Humans Methods 1974 4 27 1974 4 27 0 1 1974 4 27 0 0 ppublish 4832248 PMC1610868

1974 British medical journal

16. Bleeding Polypus of the Nose Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bleeding Polypus of the Nose 19972988 2010 06 22 2010 06 22 0035-9157 1 Laryngol Sect 1908 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. Bleeding Polypus of the Nose. 33 Kelson W H WH eng Journal Article England Proc R Soc Med 7505890 0035-9157 2009 12 9 6 0 1908 1 1 0 0 1908 1 1 0 1 ppublish 19972988 PMC2046078

1908 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

17. Dietary supplement use and nosebleeds in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia — an observational study Full Text available with Trip Pro

use, and blood indices were evaluated in an unselected group of 50 HHT patients recruited from a specialist UK service. Using the validated Epistaxis Severity Score, nosebleed severity ranged from 0 to 9.1 out of 10 (median 3.9). Using a Food Frequency Questionnaire, 24/50 (48%) participants reported use of dietary supplements in the previous year. A third (18/50; 36%) had used self prescribed, non-iron containing dietary supplements, ingesting between 1 and 3 different supplements each day. Eight (...) Dietary supplement use and nosebleeds in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia — an observational study Understanding potential provocations of haemorrhage is important in a range of clinical settings, and particularly for people with abnormal vasculature. Patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) can report haemorrhage from nasal telangiectasia in real time, and suggested dietary factors may precipitate nosebleeds. To examine further, nosebleed severity, dietary supplement

2016 Intractable & rare diseases research

18. Tranexamic acid for patients with nasal haemorrhage (epistaxis). Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tranexamic acid for patients with nasal haemorrhage (epistaxis). Epistaxis (nosebleed) most commonly affects children and the elderly. The majority of episodes are managed at home with simple measures. In more severe cases medical intervention is required to either cauterise the bleeding vessel, or to pack the nose with various materials. Tranexamic acid is used in a number of clinical settings to stop bleeding by preventing clot breakdown (fibrinolysis). It may have a role in the management (...) ; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 29 October 2018.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of tranexamic acid (in addition to usual care) compared with usual care plus placebo, usual care alone or usual care plus any other haemostatic agent, to control epistaxis in adults or children.We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were control of epistaxis: re-bleeding (as measured by the proportion

2018 Cochrane

19. Epistaxis

inflammation or hyperaemia, such as allergy, viral rhinitis, bacterial rhinosinusitis, dust, or chemicals. Although rare, neoplasm may also cause nosebleed. Topical anaesthesia and vasoconstriction are essential for initial treatment of active bleeding. If initial measures fail, almost all episodes may be controlled with anterior or anterior-posterior packing techniques. Bleeding may be refractory in the presence of coagulopathy. Definition Epistaxis, or nosebleed, is bleeding from the nasal cavity (...) . Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins; 2001:415-428. Massick D, Tobin E. Epistaxis. In: Cummings C, Flint P, Harker L, et al., eds. Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. Philadelphia: Elsevier Mosby; 2005:942-961. History and exam presence of risk factors blood at both sides of nose bleeding starting at the nares recurrent epistaxis septal deviation tachycardia bleeding starting in the throat hypotension syncope dizziness or lightheadedness pallor hypoaesthesia and pain in the distribution

2018 BMJ Best Practice

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