How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

684,591 results for

mortality

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

161. Relationship of place of death with care capacity and accessibility: a multilevel population study of system effects on place of death in Norway. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Relationship of place of death with care capacity and accessibility: a multilevel population study of system effects on place of death in Norway. While the majority of deaths in high-income countries currently occur within institutional settings such as hospitals and nursing homes, there is considerable variation in the pattern of place of death. The place of death is known to impact many relevant considerations about death and dying, such as the quality of the dying process, family involvement (...) in care, health services design and health policy, as well as public versus private costs of end-of-life care. The objective of this study was to analyse how the availability and capacity of publicly financed home-based and institutional care resources are related to place of death in Norway.This study utilized a dataset covering all deaths in Norway in the years 2003-2011, contrasting three places of death, namely hospital, nursing home and home. The analysis was performed using a multilevel

2020 BMC health services research

162. Favorable Outcomes of Liver Transplantation from Controlled Circulatory Death Donors Using Normothermic Regional Perfusion Compared to Brain Death Donors. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Favorable Outcomes of Liver Transplantation from Controlled Circulatory Death Donors Using Normothermic Regional Perfusion Compared to Brain Death Donors. Liver transplantation (LT) from controlled donation after circulatory death (cDCD) was initiated in France in 2015 under a protocol based on the use of normothermic regional perfusion (NRP) before organ procurement. The aim was to compare outcomes following cDCD LT with NRP and donation after brain death (DBD) LT.This is a multicenter (...) ), 90-d graft loss (2% versus 5%; P = 0.66), and arterial (4% versus 12%; P = 0.19) and biliary (16% versus 17%; P = 0.94) complications were similar between the 2 groups. The 2-y graft survival was 88% for cDCD group and 85% for DBD group (P = 0.91). The 2-y patient survival was 90% for cDCD group and 88% for DBD group (P = 0.68).This study provides evidence that cDCD LT following postmortem NRP can be safely and effectively performed in selected recipients with similar graft and patient survival

2020 Transplantation

163. The impact of opiate substitution treatment on mortality risk in drug addicts: a natural experiment study Full Text available with Trip Pro

The impact of opiate substitution treatment on mortality risk in drug addicts: a natural experiment study The impact of opiate substitution treatment on mortality risk in drug addicts: a natural experiment study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need (...) . >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} There was evidence that the treatment period risks varied with the medication, but buprenorphine as an alternative to methadone may not reduce mortality overall due to shorter treatment duration. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , & . Colin D Steer 1, * , John Macleod 1 , Kate Tilling 1 , Aaron G Lim 1 , John Marsden 2 , Tim Millar 3 , John Strang 2 , Maggie Telfer 4 , Heather Whitaker 5 , Peter Vickerman

2019 NIHR HTA programme

164. Interventions to reduce mortality from in-hospital cardiac arrest: a mixed-methods study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Interventions to reduce mortality from in-hospital cardiac arrest: a mixed-methods study Interventions to reduce mortality from in-hospital cardiac arrest: a mixed-methods study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue (...) }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Standardisation and automation of the collection, interpretation and response to patient physiological observations may have the greatest potential to reduce avoidable mortality from in-hospital cardiac arrest. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , & . Helen Hogan 1, * , Andrew Hutchings 1 , Jerome Wulff 2 , Catherine Carver 1 , Elizabeth Holdsworth 1 , John Welch 3 , David Harrison 2 , Nick Black 1 1 Department of Health Services Research

2019 NIHR HTA programme

165. A national quality improvement programme to improve survival after emergency abdominal surgery: the EPOCH stepped-wedge cluster RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

A national quality improvement programme to improve survival after emergency abdominal surgery: the EPOCH stepped-wedge cluster RCT A national quality improvement programme to improve survival after emergency abdominal surgery: the EPOCH stepped-wedge cluster RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try (...) a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} There was no survival benefit from a national quality improvement programme to implement a care pathway for patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Carol J Peden 1 , Tim Stephens 2 , Graham Martin 3 , Brennan C Kahan 4 , Ann Thomson 4 , Kirsty Everingham 2 , David

2019 NIHR HTA programme

166. Individualising breast cancer treatment to improve survival and minimise complications in older women: a research programme including the PLACE RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

Individualising breast cancer treatment to improve survival and minimise complications in older women: a research programme including the PLACE RCT Individualising breast cancer treatment to improve survival and minimise complications in older women: a research programme including the PLACE RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page

2019 NIHR HTA programme

167. Sustained versus standard inflations during neonatal resuscitation to prevent mortality and improve respiratory outcomes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sustained versus standard inflations during neonatal resuscitation to prevent mortality and improve respiratory outcomes. At birth, infants' lungs are fluid-filled. For newborns to have a successful transition, this fluid must be replaced by air to enable gas exchange. Some infants are judged to have inadequate breathing at birth and are resuscitated with positive pressure ventilation (PPV). Giving prolonged (sustained) inflations at the start of PPV may help clear lung fluid and establish gas (...) inflation with no chest compressions. Use of sustained inflation had no impact on the primary outcomes of this review: mortality in the delivery room (typical RR 2.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11 to 63.40 (I² not applicable); typical RD 0.00, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.02; I² = 0%; 5 studies, 479 participants); and mortality during hospitalisation (typical RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.43; I² = 42%; typical RD 0.01, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.04; I² = 24%; 9 studies, 1458 participants). The quality of the evidence

2020 Cochrane

168. Stem cell-based interventions for the prevention of morbidity and mortality following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in newborn infants. (Abstract)

(e.g. number of participants, birth weight, gestational age, type and source of MSCs or other stem cell-based interventions) and assess the risk of bias (e.g. adequacy of randomisation, blinding, completeness of follow-up). The primary outcomes considered in this review are all-cause neonatal mortality, major neurodevelopmental disability, death or major neurodevelopmental disability assessed at 18 to 24 months of age. We planned to use the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence.Our (...) Stem cell-based interventions for the prevention of morbidity and mortality following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in newborn infants. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a leading cause of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae, affecting thousands of children worldwide. Current therapies to treat HIE are limited to cooling. Stem cell-based therapies offer a potential therapeutic approach to repair or regenerate injured brain tissue. These preclinical findings have now

2020 Cochrane

169. In patients with overt signs of an upper gastrointestinal bleeding event, does urgent endoscopy provide a mortality benefit compared with early endoscopy? Full Text available with Trip Pro

resuscitation is, however, limited. Discussion Points 1. These authors reported 30-day all-cause mortality as their primary outcome. It could be argued a more relevant outcome might be early death owing to bleeding. What considerations might inform these outcome choices? The proposed alternative primary outcome is an example of a disease-specific outcome. At face value, it would seem appropriate to match an intervention for bleeding with an outcome directly measuring the consequences of bleeding. Advantages (...) multiple chronic conditions: development and initial evaluation of the QOL Disease Impact Scale (QDIS®). Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016; 14 : 84 However, disease-specific outcomes, particularly mortality, do not always exhibit patient-oriented features. With respect to mortality, as in this trial, a patient is less likely concerned regarding the specific cause and timing of death and more likely concerned regarding their overall mortality status. Disease-specific mortality is therefore a surrogate

2021 Annals of Emergency Medicine Journal Club

170. Sudden infant death syndrome

that onset of the fatal event seems to be associated with sleep, Krous HF, Beckwith JB, Byard RW, et al. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and unclassified sudden infant death (USID): a definitional and diagnostic approach. Pediatrics. 2004 Jul;114(1):234-8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15231934?tool=bestpractice.com Bajanowski T, Vege A, Byard RW, et al. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) - standardised investigations and classification: recommendations. Forensic Sci Int. 2007 Jan 17;165(2-3 (...) Sudden infant death syndrome Sudden infant death syndrome - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Sudden infant death syndrome Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Leading cause of infant death beyond the neonatal period. Incidence roughly 1 in 2000 infants. Peak incidence between 1 and 3 months of age, although events may occur up to 12 months of age. Risk factors include exposure

2017 BMJ Best Practice

171. Canadian guidelines for controlled pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death-summary report Full Text available with Trip Pro

or hospital practices, policies, and guidelines. 21) The critical care team must be responsible for patient management between the decision to WLST and the determination of death. 22) The ODO, organ recovery, and transplant team must not be involved in any aspect of management of the dying process. 23) WLST may occur in the critical care unit, near the operating room, or in the operating room, as determined by surrogate decision makers’ preferences, institutional logistics, resources, and facilities. 24 (...) of the body. | Justification. In general, we felt that there are more similarities than differences between neonatal and pediatric DCD practice. As with all potential DCD donors, optimal EOL care should remain the fundamental concern in a neonatal pDCD process. The particular relational and ethical aspects of neonatal death require the expertise of a clinician trained to deal with these EOL issues ( , ). Also, even less is known about the rate of the dying process after WLST in neonates and how that might

2017 CPG Infobase

172. Infant pacifiers for reduction in risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Infant pacifiers for reduction in risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been most recently defined as the sudden unexpected death of an infant less than one year of age, with onset of the fatal episode apparently occurring during sleep, that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation, including the performance of a complete autopsy and a review of the circumstances of death and clinical history. Despite the success of several prevention campaigns (...) , SIDS remains a leading cause of infant mortality. In 1994, a 'triple risk model' for SIDS was proposed that described SIDS as an event that results from the intersection of three factors: a vulnerable infant; a critical development period in homeostatic control (age related); and an exogenous stressor. The association between pacifier (dummy) use and reduced incidence of SIDS has been shown in epidemiological studies since the early 1990s. Pacifier use, given its low cost, might be a cost-effective

2017 Cochrane

173. Development and validation of a prognostic model to predict death in patients with traumatic bleeding, and evaluation of the effect of tranexamic acid on mortality according to baseline risk: a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

on all-cause mortality, death due to bleeding and thrombotic events (fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) within these strata. Results A total of 3076 (15%) patients died in the CRASH-2 trial and 1705 (12%) in the TARN data set. Glasgow Coma Scale score, age and systolic blood pressure were the strongest predictors of mortality. Other predictors included in the final model were geographical region (low-, middle- or high-income countries (...) of heterogeneity in the effect of TXA on all-cause mortality (p-value for interaction = 0.96) or death due to bleeding (p = 0.98). There was a significant reduction in the odds of fatal and non-fatal thrombotic events with TXA [odds ratio (OR) = 0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 0.89; p = 0.005]. There was a statistically significant reduction in arterial thrombotic events (OR = 0.58; 95% CI 0.40 to 0.83; p = 0.003) and a reduction in venous thrombotic events that was not statistically significant

2013 NIHR HTA programme

174. Cutaneous Toxic Effects in tumor patients treated with Programmed Cell Death-1 checkpoint inhibitors and/or Programmed Death-Ligand 1 checkpoint inhibitors and its association with survival: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Cutaneous Toxic Effects in tumor patients treated with Programmed Cell Death-1 checkpoint inhibitors and/or Programmed Death-Ligand 1 checkpoint inhibitors and its association with survival: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate

2021 PROSPERO

175. Withholding or withdrawing invasive interventions may not accelerate time to death among dying ICU patients. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Withholding or withdrawing invasive interventions may not accelerate time to death among dying ICU patients. Critically ill patients may die despite invasive intervention. In this study, we examine trends in the application of two such treatments over a decade, namely, endotracheal ventilation and vasopressors and inotropes administration, as well as the impact of these trends on survival durations in patients who die within a month of ICU admission.We considered observational data available (...) from the MIMIC-III open-access ICU database and collected within a study period between year 2002 up to 2011. If a patient had multiple admissions to the ICU during the 30 days before death, only the first stay was analyzed, leading to a final set of 6,436 unique ICU admissions during the study period. We tested two hypotheses: (i) administration of invasive intervention during the ICU stay immediately preceding end-of-life would decrease over the study time period and (ii) time-to-death from ICU

2019 PLoS ONE

176. Middle-aged death and taxes in the USA: Association of state tax burden and expenditures in 2005 with survival from 2006 to 2015. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Middle-aged death and taxes in the USA: Association of state tax burden and expenditures in 2005 with survival from 2006 to 2015. Longevity in the United States ranks below most other Western nations despite spending more on healthcare per capita than any other country. Across the world, mortality has been declining, but in the USA the trend toward improvement has stalled in some middle-aged demographic groups. Cross-national studies suggest that social welfare is positively associated (...) capita in 2005 for education, healthcare, welfare, police and highways. The dependent variable was mortality during the subsequent 10 years. Death counts and population sizes by sex, age group and race strata for 2006-2015 were abstracted from CDC WONDER. Binomial logistic regression was employed based on the number of deaths and underlying population within each county-sex-age-race bin.State tax burden in 2005 varied from 5.8% to 12.2%. An increase of 1.0 percentage point in state tax burden

2019 PLoS ONE

177. Survival and death of intestinal cells infected by Chlamydia trachomatis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Survival and death of intestinal cells infected by Chlamydia trachomatis. The sexually transmitted pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is able to replicate and survive in human intestinal epithelial cells, being the gastro-intestinal tract a suitable site of residence for this microorganism. In this context, no detailed information about the mechanisms of cell death in intestinal cell lines after a chlamydial infection is available. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two (...) different CT serovars (D and L2) on the survival/death of different intestinal cell lines (Caco-2 and COLO-205), using endocervical cells (HeLa) as a reference model of genital infection. Seventy two hours after chlamydial infection at different multiplicity of infection (MOI) levels, the viability of HeLa, Caco-2 and COLO 205 cells was evaluated through dose-response experiments by means of a MTS-based assay. To get deeper insights in the mechanisms of cell death induced by CT, cell viability

2019 PLoS ONE

178. A new method to attribute differences in total deaths between groups to population size, age structure and age-specific mortality rate. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A new method to attribute differences in total deaths between groups to population size, age structure and age-specific mortality rate. Two decomposition methods have been widely used to attribute death differences between two populations to population size, age structure of the population, and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR), but their properties remain uninvestigated.We assess how the two established decomposition methods yield varying results with three-factor factorial experimental

2019 PLoS ONE

179. Partner resources and incidence and survival in two major causes of death Full Text available with Trip Pro

Partner resources and incidence and survival in two major causes of death Because people tend to marry social equals - and possibly also because partners affect each other's health - the social position of one partner is associated with the other partner's health and mortality. Although this link is fairly well established, the underlying mechanisms are not fully identified. Analyzing disease incidence and survival separately may help us to assess when in the course of the disease a partner's (...) resources are of most significance. This article addresses the importance of partner's education, income, employment status, and health for incidence and survival in two major causes of death: cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Based on a sample of Finnish middle-aged and older couples (around 200,000 individuals) we show that a partner's education is more often connected to incidence than to survival, in particular for CVD. Once ill, any direct effect of partner's education seems to decline

2018 SSM - population health

180. Dynamic statistical model for predicting the risk of death among older Chinese people, using longitudinal repeated measures of the frailty index: a prospective cohort study

Dynamic statistical model for predicting the risk of death among older Chinese people, using longitudinal repeated measures of the frailty index: a prospective cohort study Dynamic Statistical Model for Predicting the Risk of Death Among Older Chinese People, Using Longitudinal Repeated Measures of the Frailty Index: A Prospective Cohort Study - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History (...) a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Age Ageing Actions . 2020 May 4;afaa056. doi: 10.1093/ageing/afaa056. Online ahead of print. Dynamic Statistical Model for Predicting the Risk of Death Among Older Chinese People, Using Longitudinal Repeated Measures of the Frailty Index: A Prospective Cohort Study , , , , , , , , , Affiliations

2020 EvidenceUpdates

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>