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1. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) for the prevention of cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Green tea (Camellia sinensis) for the prevention of cancer. This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2009, Issue 3).Tea is one of the most commonly consumed beverages worldwide. Teas from the plant Camellia sinensis can be grouped into green, black and oolong tea, and drinking habits vary cross-culturally. C sinensis contains polyphenols, one subgroup being catechins. Catechins are powerful antioxidants, and laboratory studies (...) have suggested that these compounds may inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Some experimental and nonexperimental epidemiological studies have suggested that green tea may have cancer-preventative effects.To assess possible associations between green tea consumption and the risk of cancer incidence and mortality as primary outcomes, and safety data and quality of life as secondary outcomes.We searched eligible studies up to January 2019 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference

2020 Cochrane

2. Camellia sinensis Tea and Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

of Camellia sinensis species is one of the most world-wide favorite beverages and is consumed by over two-thirds of world’s population. Based on the processing methods and sensory qualities of products, the six types of tea were defined as green, yellow, dark, oolong, white, and black teas [1] . Of which, three types are widely available on the global markets and more often cited as green tea, black tea and oolong tea [2] . The consumption of tea has been believed to have association with cancer risk (...) polyphenols could prevent the growth of prostate cancer in animal model studies [19, 38] , the results from a comparative study on the chemopreventive effect of black tea and green tea provided evidence that green tea has the stronger chemopreventive effect [39] . An exploratory meta-analysis of observational researches on green tea and black tea consumption and prostate cancer risk revealed that green tea drinking may have a protective effect on prostate cancer in Asian populations, especially

2019 Journal of Ayurvedic and Herbal Medicine

3. Association of tea consumption and the risk of gastric cancer in Japanese adults: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

of cancer were available.63 848 participants (26 025 men and 37 823 women), aged 40-79, were included in the analyses and underwent follow-up (median 13.3 years) prospectively in research on cancer incidence.The primary outcome variable was the risk of GC according to the frequency intakes of total tea, green tea, black tea and oolong tea. The adjusted HRs for the risk of GC associated with tea consumption were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model.1494 cases of GC were detected (960 men (...) Association of tea consumption and the risk of gastric cancer in Japanese adults: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. To examine the possible relationship between tea consumption and risk of gastric cancer (GC) among Japanese men and women included in a large Japanese population-based study titled the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study.Prospective cohort study.A population-based cohort included subjects who were recruited from 24 areas of JACC Study, in which data regarding the incidence

2020 BMJ open

4. Inhibitory effect of black tea pigments, theaflavin-3/3′-gallate against cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

Inhibitory effect of black tea pigments, theaflavin-3/3′-gallate against cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest Adverse side effects and acquired resistance to conventional chemotherapy based on platinum drive the exploration of other selective anticancer drugs. Theaflavin‑3-gallate (TF2a) and theaflavin‑3'-gallate (TF2b), theaflavin monomers in black tea, exhibited a potent growth inhibitory effect on cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780 (...) /CP70 cells and were less cytotoxic to normal ovarian IOSE-364 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis and western blotting indicated that TF2a and TF2b induced apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest in ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells. Hoechst 33342 staining was used to confirm the apoptotic effect. Downregulation of CDK2 and CDK4 for TF2a and CDK2 and cyclin E1 for TF2b led to the accumulation of cells in G1 phase. TF2a and TF2b induced apoptosis and G1 through p53-dependent pathways. TF2a and TF2b induced

2017 International journal of oncology

5. Re: Randomized Clinical Trial of Brewed Green and Black Tea in Men with Prostate Cancer Prior to Prostatectomy. (Abstract)

Re: Randomized Clinical Trial of Brewed Green and Black Tea in Men with Prostate Cancer Prior to Prostatectomy. 26292860 2016 04 29 2018 12 02 1527-3792 194 3 2015 Sep The Journal of urology J. Urol. Re: Randomized Clinical Trial of Brewed Green and Black Tea in Men with Prostate Cancer Prior to Prostatectomy. 704-5 10.1016/j.juro.2015.06.050 S0022-5347(15)04182-8 Taneja Samir S SS eng Journal Article Comment 2015 06 15 United States J Urol 0376374 0022-5347 0 Biomarkers, Tumor 0 Plant Extracts (...) 0 Tea AIM IM Prostate. 2015 Apr 1;75(5):550-9 25545744 Biomarkers, Tumor blood Humans Male Phytotherapy Plant Extracts administration & dosage Prostatectomy Prostatic Neoplasms drug therapy Tea chemistry 2015 8 22 6 0 2015 8 22 6 0 2016 4 30 6 0 ppublish 26292860 S0022-5347(15)04182-8 10.1016/j.juro.2015.06.050

2016 The Journal of urology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6. Inhibitory Effects of the Four Main Theaflavin Derivatives Found in Black Tea on Ovarian Cancer Cells Full Text available with Trip Pro

Inhibitory Effects of the Four Main Theaflavin Derivatives Found in Black Tea on Ovarian Cancer Cells Some polyphenols induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. Consumption of black tea, rich in polyphenols, has been found to reduce ovarian cancer risk. Theaflavin (TF1), theaflavin-3-gallate (TF2a), theaflavin-3'-gallate (TF2b) and theaflavin-3, 3'-digallate (TF3) are four main theaflavin derivatives found in black tea.Cell proliferation assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay, Caspase-Glo Assay (...) , western blot, human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation assay and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed.All four theaflavin derivatives reduced viability of ovarian cancer cells at lower concentrations than with normal ovarian cells. TF1 mainly mediated apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, while the others via the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. TF1 inhibited tube formation via reducing VEGF secretion in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α

2016 Anticancer research

7. Coffee, tea, caffeine, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a Chinese population: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. (Abstract)

Coffee, tea, caffeine, and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a Chinese population: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. While epidemiological studies in populations of European-descent suggest possible chemo-protective effect of caffeine against non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), data in Asian populations are lacking.We examined the relations between coffee, tea and caffeine consumption, and NMSC risk among Chinese in Singapore.We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective (...) carcinoma. Compared with non-drinkers, daily drinkers of black tea also had reduced NMSC risk (HR=0.70; 95% CI=0.52-0.94). Caffeine intake reduced NMSC risk in a stepwise manner (P trend=0.0025); subjects with caffeine intake ≥400 mg/day had the lowest risk (HR=0.59; 95% CI=0.34-1.04).Consumption of caffeinated drinks such as coffee and black tea may reduce the risk of NMSC among Chinese.Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.

2019 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

8. A META-ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF GREEN TEA COMBINED WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON BLOOD LIPIDS IN HUMANS Full Text available with Trip Pro

of these catechins. Study have shown that tea catechins can be used to help prevent various types of disease, describing their anti-bacterial, anti-obesity, anti-diabetic, and anti-cancer effects. The preventing of CVD is a major, important effect of GTE and can be largely attributed to EGCG, the major the most pharmacologically active component of tea catechins. Several mechanisms through which green tea extract can reduce the risk of CVD have been suggested. One of the main mechanisms is the antioxidant (...) in the inclusion of patients with metabolic syndrome, obese subjects, and breast cancer survivors in our review. The LDL-C levels varied markedly among our populations, which featured postmenopausal women, patients with hypercholesterolemia, and older subjects. The cholesterol concentrations also varied according to age and body mass index, which might be why our review revealed no significant finding. Two RCT studies by Samavat et al. and Wu et al. showing that green tea catechins were able to reduce

2020 Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte

9. Antioxidants from black and green tea: from dietary modulation of oxidative stress to pharmacological mechanisms Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antioxidants from black and green tea: from dietary modulation of oxidative stress to pharmacological mechanisms The consumption of tea (Camellia sinensis) has been correlated with a low incidence of chronic pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, in which oxidative stress plays a critical role. Tea catechins and theaflavins are, respectively, the bioactive phytochemicals responsible for the antioxidant activity of green tea (GT) and black tea (BT). In addition to their redox (...) properties, tea catechins and theaflavins could have also pharmacological activities, such as the ability to lower glucose, lipid and uric acid (UA) levels. These activities are mediated by pharmacological mechanisms such as enzymatic inhibition and interaction with transporters. Epigallocatechin gallate is the most active compound at inhibiting the enzymes involved in cholesterol and UA metabolism (hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase and xanthine oxidase respectively) and affecting glucose

2016 British journal of pharmacology

10. Black Tea Consumption and Risk of Skin Cancer: An 11-Year Prospective Study. (Abstract)

Black Tea Consumption and Risk of Skin Cancer: An 11-Year Prospective Study. Tea consumption has been shown to protect against skin carcinogenesis in laboratory-based studies; however, epidemiological evidence is limited and inconsistent. This prospective study examined the association between black tea consumption and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Usual black tea consumption was estimated from food frequency questionnaires completed in 1992 (...) , 1994, and 1996 by 1,325 Australian adults. All histologically confirmed skin cancers diagnosed in participants from 1997 to 2007 were recorded. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were assessed using generalized linear models with Poisson and negative binomial distributions and adjusted for confounding factors including skin phenotype and sun exposure. Compared with never drinking black tea, drinking ≥4 cups/day was not associated with BCC (RR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.70-1.53; P-trend

2015 Nutrition and cancer Controlled trial quality: uncertain

11. Synergistic anticancer activity of biologicals from green and black tea on DU 145 human prostate cancer cells Full Text available with Trip Pro

Synergistic anticancer activity of biologicals from green and black tea on DU 145 human prostate cancer cells There is considerable interest in the potential of botanicals in preventing and/or alleviating chronic ailments. Among the most studied botanicals are compounds present in green and black teas. Nontoxic tea polyphenols are potent antioxidants, and they also modulate several signalling pathways and inhibit proteins such as MMP-9 or protein plasminogen activator system, making them very (...) to consume teas for five days before surgery. Tea polyphenols were detected in the prostate. This fact contradicts the common misconception of poor bioavailability of TF and EGCG and makes feasible the application of green or black tea polyphenols as prophylactic and therapeutic agents. Theaflavins and catechins seem to act on cancer cells largely through different pathways, so utilisation of both could offer synergistic anticancer effects, but so far no work has been done on the cumulative effects

2015 Central-European Journal of Immunology

12. Randomized clinical trial of brewed green and black tea in men with prostate cancer prior to prostatectomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomized clinical trial of brewed green and black tea in men with prostate cancer prior to prostatectomy. Preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest chemopreventive effects of green tea (GT) and black tea (BT) in prostate cancer. In the current study we determined the effect of GT and BT consumption on biomarkers related to prostate cancer development and progression.In this exploratory, open label, phase II trial 113 men diagnosed with prostate cancer were randomized to consume six cups (...) daily of brewed GT, BT or water (control) prior to radical prostatectomy (RP). The primary endpoint was prostate tumor markers of cancer development and progression determined by tissue immunostaining of proliferation (Ki67), apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, Tunel), inflammation (nuclear and cytoplasmic nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB]) and oxidation (8-hydroxydeoxy-guanosine [8OHdG]). Secondary endpoints of urinary oxidation, tea polyphenol uptake in prostate tissue, and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA

2015 Prostate Controlled trial quality: uncertain

13. Effect of green tea consumption on blood lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Full Text available with Trip Pro

on the basis of the article title and abstract screening. We included 105 articles in the full-text review during which 74 articles were excluded for various reasons: 27 articles did not report enough details for inclusion, 25 articles did not report relevant outcomes, 8 articles were excluded because the subjects had been treated with black tea or oolong tea, 5 studies were < 2 weeks in duration, 9 studies used green tea a multicomponent supplement in the experimental group. Thus, 31 articles were (...) and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all causes in Japan: the Ohsaki study. JAMA. 2006;296(10):1255–65. 8. Imai K, Nakachi K. Cross sectional study of effects of drinking green tea on cardiovascular and liver diseases. BMJ. 1995;310(6981):693–6. 9. Khan N, Mukhtar H. Tea polyphenols for health promotion. Life Sci. 2007;81(7):519–33. 10. Oz HS, Chen T, de Villiers WJ. Green tea polyphenols and sulfasalazine have parallel anti-inflammatory properties in colitis models. Front Immunol

2020 Nutrition journal

14. Effects of green tea consumption on glycemic control: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Full Text available with Trip Pro

specified. Results Results of the literature search The search strategy identified 2324 abstracts. After the titles and abstracts were screened, 2229 articles were excluded and 95 articles underwent full-text review. A further 68 articles were excluded for the following reasons: 26 articles did not provide relevant outcomes, 14 articles involved green tea as a multicomponent supplement in the experimental group, 12 articles were excluded because the subjects had been treated with black tea or oolong tea (...) controlled green tea intervention on lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, and hormone levels in healthy postmenopausal women. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2012;5:393–402. 49. Zheng XX, Xu YL, Li SH, Hui R, Wu YJ, Huang XH. Effects of green tea catechins with or without caffeine on glycemic control in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;97:750–62. 50. Kondo Y, Goto A, Noma H, Iso H, Hayashi K, Noda M. Effects of coffee and tea consumption on glucose metabolism

2020 Nutrition & metabolism

15. Tea (Camellia sinensis) infusions ameliorate cancer in 4TI metastatic breast cancer model. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tea (Camellia sinensis) infusions ameliorate cancer in 4TI metastatic breast cancer model. Tea (Camellia sinensis) infusions are widely consumed beverages with numerous health benefits. However, physiological and molecular responses mediating these activities are poorly understood.Three replicates of 4TI cancer cell suspension (2.0 × 105 cells/ml) were challenged in vitro with various concentrations of green, black and purple tea infusions to asseses their cytoxicity and associated (...) differentially expressed genes in the cells. Inhibitory activity was tested by using serial dilutions of respective tea infusions in a 96 well ELISA plate.Green tea had the highest inhibition on 4TI cells proliferation at a concentration of IC50 = 13.12 μg/ml. Further analysis of the 4TI cancer cell line treated with tea using 454 pyrosequencing generated 425,696 reads with an input mean length of 286.54. Trimmed sequences were imported on a CLC genomic workbench v7.03 and annotated on a reference mouse

2017 BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine

16. Phenolic acid concentrations in plasma and urine from men consuming green or black tea and potential chemopreventive properties for colon cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Phenolic acid concentrations in plasma and urine from men consuming green or black tea and potential chemopreventive properties for colon cancer. Tea polyphenols are metabolized by the colonic microflora yielding phenolic metabolites, which may contribute to the health benefits of tea. We determined the serum and urine concentrations of phenolic acids, hippuric acid, and polyhydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactones during green tea (GT) and black tea (BT) administration. The effects (...) of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPAA) alone and in combination on bioavailability, intracellular metabolism, and antiproliferative activity were determined in HCT-116 colon cancer cells.The concentration of phenolic metabolites was quantified by HPLC with electrochemical detection and MS. Urine concentrations of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (3-HPAA), and polyhydroxy-γ-valerolactones were increased significantly in men drinking GT

2013 Molecular nutrition & food research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

17. Dietary Flavonoid Intake, Black Tea Consumption, and Risk of Overall and Advanced Stage Prostate Cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Dietary Flavonoid Intake, Black Tea Consumption, and Risk of Overall and Advanced Stage Prostate Cancer. Flavonoids are natural antioxidants found in various foods, and a major source is black tea. Some experimental evidence indicates that flavonoids could prevent prostate cancer. We investigated the associations between flavonoid intake, black tea consumption, and prostate cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort study, which includes 58,279 men who provided detailed baseline information (...) on several cancer risk factors. From 1986 to 2003, 3,362 prostate cancers were identified, including 1,164 advanced (stage III/IV) cancers. Cox proportional hazards regression using the case-cohort approach was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Intake of total catechin, epicatechin, kaempferol, and myricetin and consumption of black tea were associated with a decreased risk of stage III/IV or stage IV prostate cancer. Hazard ratios of stage III/IV and stage IV prostate cancer

2013 American Journal of Epidemiology

18. Tea, coffee, and caffeinated beverage consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancers. (Abstract)

Tea, coffee, and caffeinated beverage consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancers. The risk for epithelial ovarian cancer associated with the consumption of caffeinated beverages (tea, coffee, and soft drinks) and green tea is inconclusive. However, few studies have investigated the type of caffeinated beverage or the type of tea.We assessed consumption of tea (black/caffeinated tea and green tea separately), coffee, and caffeinated soft drinks, as well as level of consumption (...) , and the risk for epithelial ovarian cancer and its histotypes.This study was conducted within a population-based case-control study in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada from 2001 to 2012. After restricting to cases of epithelial invasive cancers and controls aged 40-79 years who completed an interview that included coffee, soft drink, and tea consumption (ascertained starting in 2005 in British Columbia and 2008 in Alberta), there were a total of 524 cases and 1587 controls. Those that did not meet

2017 Cancer epidemiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

19. Reduced prostate cancer risk with green tea and epigallocatechin 3-gallate intake among Hong Kong Chinese men. (Abstract)

Reduced prostate cancer risk with green tea and epigallocatechin 3-gallate intake among Hong Kong Chinese men. In vitro and in vivo studies suggested that polyphenol epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) in tea may have anti-carcinogenic effect on prostate cells, but this protective effect has less been examined in epidemiology studies. We aimed to investigate the association between prostate cancer (PCA) risk and habitual green tea intake among Chinese men in Hong Kong; meanwhile, the relationship (...) with EGCG was also explored.We consecutively recruited 404 PCA cases and 395 controls from the same hospital who had complete data on habitual tea consumption, including green, oolong, black and pu'er tea. We reconstructed the level of EGCG intake according to a standard questionnaire and the analytic values for EGCG extracted from the literature published by Lin et al. in 2003. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for tea consumption and EGCG intake using unconditional multiple logistic regression

2017 Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases

20. Beneficial Effects of Green Tea Catechins on Neurodegenerative Diseases Full Text available with Trip Pro

Beneficial Effects of Green Tea Catechins on Neurodegenerative Diseases Tea is one of the most consumed beverages in the world. Green tea, black tea, and oolong tea are made from the same plant Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze. Among them, green tea has been the most extensively studied for beneficial effects on diseases including cancer, obesity, diabetes, and inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Several human observational and intervention studies have found beneficial effects of tea (...) consumption on neurodegenerative impairment, such as cognitive dysfunction and memory loss. These studies supported the basis of tea's preventive effects of Parkinson's disease, but few studies have revealed such effects on Alzheimer's disease. In contrast, several human studies have not reported these favorable effects with regard to tea. This discrepancy may be due to incomplete adjustment of confounding factors, including the method of quantifying consumption, beverage temperature, cigarette smoking

2018 Molecules : A Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry

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