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bell's palsy guideline

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1. Management of Bell palsy: clinical practice guideline

Management of Bell palsy: clinical practice guideline B ell palsy is an idiopathic weakness or paralysis of the face of peripheral nerve origin, with acute onset. It affects 20–30 persons per 100 000 annually, and 1 in 60 indi- viduals will be affected over the course of their lifetime. 1,2 The major cause of Bell palsy is believed to be an infection of the facial nerve by the herpes simplex virus. 3 As a result of this viral infection, the facial nerve swells and is compressed in its canal (...) and permanent visual impairment. Those with resid- ual deficits may have long-term reduction in quality of life and psychological distress. 8 In this guideline, we review the evidence for treatment of Bell palsy with corticosteroids and antivirals, facial exercise, electrostimulation, physiotherapy and decompression surgery, as well as the need for eye-protective measures, spe- cialist referral and further investigation in patients with persistent and progressive weakness. This guideline is aimed at all

2014 CPG Infobase

2. Bell's palsy

-based guidelines No new evidence-based guidelines since 1 July 2018. HTAs (Health Technology Assessments) No new HTAs since 1 July 2018. Economic appraisals No new economic appraisals relevant to England since 1 July 2018. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses Yang, W., Li, J., Ma, Q., et al. (2018) A Network Meta-Analysis to Compare the Efficacy of Steroid and Antiviral Medications for Facial Paralysis from Bell´s Palsy. Pain Physician. [ ] Gagyor, I., Madhok, V., Daly, F., et al (2019) Antiviral (...) treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis). The Cochrane Library. [ ] Primary evidence No new randomized controlled trials published in the major journals since 1 July 2018. New policies New policies No new national policies or guidelines since 1 July 2018. New safety alerts New safety alerts No new safety alerts since 1 July 2018. Changes in product availability Changes in product availability No changes in product availability since 1 July 2018. Goals and outcome measures Goals

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

3. Variations in the management of acute Bell's palsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Variations in the management of acute Bell's palsy. To identify presiding practices among neurotologists (ORL) in the care of acute Bell's palsy, and to compare them to neurologists' treatment patterns.Cross-sectional survey study.Neurotologists and neurologists.Ninety-one responses to the survey were obtained. The majority of participants (87.9%) always prescribe steroids. ORL were more likely to prescribe higher doses (≥60 mg) than neurologists (89.7% vs. 58.0%) (p = 0.001). Anti-viral (...) never order labs (p < 0.001).ORL almost always prescribe steroids, prescribe antivirals around 50% of the time, and only sometimes obtain imaging for acute Bell's palsy. Compared to neurologists, ORL are more likely to order high dose steroids (≥60 mg), more commonly prescribe antivirals, and are less likely to order laboratory blood work. Regarding the treatment of acute Bell's palsy, there are discrepancies both within otolaryngology, and between otolaryngology and neurology, despite recently

2020 American Journal of Otolaryngology

4. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Idiopathic Facial Paresis (Bell's Palsy). Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Diagnosis and Treatment of Idiopathic Facial Paresis (Bell's Palsy). Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most com- mon functional disturbance of a cranial nerve. 60-75% of cases are idiopathic.This review is based on a selective literature search proceeding from the current, updated German-language guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic facial nerve palsy.The recommended drug treatment consists of prednisolone 25 mg bid for 10 days, or 60 mg qd for 5 days followed (...) moisture- retaining eye shield has been found useful in practice. In cases of incomplete recovery with residual facial weakness, both static and microsurgical dynamic methods can be used to restore facial nerve function.Because 25-40% of cases of facial nerve palsy are not idiopathic, differential diagnosis is very important; key diagnostic methods include a clinical neurological examin- ation, otoscopy, and a lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid examination. High-level evidence supports

2019 Deutsches Arzteblatt international

5. Intratympanic Steroid for Bell's Palsy

first. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Bell's Palsy Facial Nerve Paresis Procedure: Intratympanic injection Drug: Prednisone Phase 2 Phase 3 Detailed Description: Facial nerve paralysis is due to inflammation surrounding the facial nerve. Current clinical practice guidelines for treatment of facial nerve paralysis recommend a 10 day course of oral steroids +/- oral acyclovir. Treatment should begin within 72 hours of symptom onset. In patients with complete facial paralysis (...) Intratympanic Steroid for Bell's Palsy Intratympanic Steroid for Bell's Palsy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Intratympanic Steroid for Bell's Palsy The safety and scientific validity

2018 Clinical Trials

6. Pharmacologic Interventions for Bell's Palsy

Pharmacologic Interventions for Bell's Palsy Pharmacologic Interventions for Bell's Palsy | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUL Aug 12 2018 2019 30 Sep 2016 - 14 Jul 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective dedicated to saving copies of rapidly dying or deleted websites for the sake of history and digital heritage. The group is 100% composed of volunteers (...) * Remember Me Don't have an account? The AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, guideline.gov) Web site will not be available after July 16, 2018 because federal funding through AHRQ will no longer be available to support the NGC as of that date. For additional information, read our . Guideline Synthesis Pharmacologic Interventions for Bell's Palsy Guidelines Being Compared: American Academy of Neurology (Am Acad Neurol) Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: report

2014 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

7. Bell's palsy

Bell's palsy Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell’s Palsy - Reginald F. Baugh, Gregory J. Basura, Lisa E. Ishii, Seth R. Schwartz, Caitlin Murray Drumheller, Rebecca Burkholder, Nathan A. Deckard, Cindy Dawson, Colin Driscoll, M. Boyd Gillespie, Richard K. Gurgel, John Halperin, Ayesha N. Khalid, Kaparaboyna Ashok Kumar, Alan Micco, Debra Munsell, Steven Rosenbaum, William Vaughan, 2013 MENU IN THIS JOURNAL Sign In Institution Society Access Options You can be signed in via any or all (...) Guideline: Bell’s Palsy .entryAuthor" data-author-container-selector=".NLM_contrib-group"> Show all authors , MD 1 1University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio, USA by this author for this author , , MD, PhD 2 2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA by this author for this author , , MD, MHS 3 3Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA by this author for this author , , MD, MPH 4 4Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA by this author for this author , 5

2013 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

8. Photographic Standards for Patients With Facial Palsy and Recommendations by Members of the Sir Charles Bell Society. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Photographic Standards for Patients With Facial Palsy and Recommendations by Members of the Sir Charles Bell Society. There is no widely accepted assessment tool or common language used by clinicians caring for patients with facial palsy, making exchange of information challenging. Standardized photography may represent such a language and is imperative for precise exchange of information and comparison of outcomes in this special patient population.To review the literature to evaluate the use (...) of facial photography in the management of patients with facial palsy and to examine the use of photography in documenting facial nerve function among members of the Sir Charles Bell Society-a group of medical professionals dedicated to care of patients with facial palsy.A literature search was performed to review photographic standards in patients with facial palsy. In addition, a cross-sectional survey of members of the Sir Charles Bell Society was conducted to examine use of medical photography

2017 JAMA facial plastic surgery

9. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC)-like squamous cell carcinoma as a differential diagnosis to Bell´s palsy: review of guidelines for refractory facial nerve palsy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC)-like squamous cell carcinoma as a differential diagnosis to Bell´s palsy: review of guidelines for refractory facial nerve palsy Bell´s palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis worldwide and the most common disorder of the cranial nerves. It is a diagnosis of exclusion, accounting for 60-75% of all acquired peripheral facial nerve palsies. Our case shows the first case of a microcystic adnexal carcinoma-like squamous cell carcinoma as a cause (...) of facial nerve palsy.The patient, a 70-year-old Caucasian male, experienced subsequent functional impairment of the trigeminal and the glossopharyngeal nerve about 1½ years after refractory facial nerve palsy. An extensive clinical work-up and tissue biopsy of the surrounding parotid gland tissue was not able to determine the cause of the paralysis. Primary infiltration of the facial nerve with subsequent spreading to the trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerve via neuroanastomoses was suspected. After

2017 Journal of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

10. Bell's palsy: aetiology, clinical features and multidisciplinary care. Full Text available with Trip Pro

along with in vitro studies of virus-axon interactions. Recently published guidelines for the acute treatment of Bell's palsy advocate for steroid monotherapy, although controversy exists over whether combined corticosteroids and antivirals may possibly have a beneficial role in select cases of severe Bell's palsy. For those with longstanding sequaelae from incomplete recovery, aesthetic, functional (nasal patency, eye closure, speech and swallowing) and psychological considerations need (...) Bell's palsy: aetiology, clinical features and multidisciplinary care. Bell's palsy is a common cranial neuropathy causing acute unilateral lower motor neuron facial paralysis. Immune, infective and ischaemic mechanisms are all potential contributors to the development of Bell's palsy, but the precise cause remains unclear. Advancements in the understanding of intra-axonal signal molecules and the molecular mechanisms underpinning Wallerian degeneration may further delineate its pathogenesis

2015 Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

11. Guidelines on Diabetes, Pre-Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD Full Text available with Trip Pro

Guidelines on Diabetes, Pre-Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD 2019 ESC Guidelines on diabetes, pre-diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic ') We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website.By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter (...) Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article Navigation Article Contents Article Navigation 2019 ESC Guidelines on diabetes, pre-diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD: The Task Force for diabetes, pre-diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Francesco Cosentino ESC Chairperson Sweden

2019 European Society of Cardiology

12. Bell Palsy (Follow-up)

parameter in 2001 stating that steroids are probably effective and acyclovir (with prednisone) is possibly effective for the treatment of Bell palsy. There was insufficient evidence for recommendations on facial decompression surgery. [ ] In 2012, the AAN released guidelines stating that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (...) mentioned, 2012 guidelines from the AAN state that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) were issued in November 2013 that also support the AAN guidelines. The guidelines recommend use of corticosteroids within 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Antiviral agents (eg, acyclovir, valacyclovir) may

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Bell Palsy (Follow-up)

parameter in 2001 stating that steroids are probably effective and acyclovir (with prednisone) is possibly effective for the treatment of Bell palsy. There was insufficient evidence for recommendations on facial decompression surgery. [ ] In 2012, the AAN released guidelines stating that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (...) mentioned, 2012 guidelines from the AAN state that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) were issued in November 2013 that also support the AAN guidelines. The guidelines recommend use of corticosteroids within 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Antiviral agents (eg, acyclovir, valacyclovir) may

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Bell Palsy (Treatment)

parameter in 2001 stating that steroids are probably effective and acyclovir (with prednisone) is possibly effective for the treatment of Bell palsy. There was insufficient evidence for recommendations on facial decompression surgery. [ ] In 2012, the AAN released guidelines stating that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (...) mentioned, 2012 guidelines from the AAN state that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) were issued in November 2013 that also support the AAN guidelines. The guidelines recommend use of corticosteroids within 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Antiviral agents (eg, acyclovir, valacyclovir) may

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Bell Palsy (Treatment)

parameter in 2001 stating that steroids are probably effective and acyclovir (with prednisone) is possibly effective for the treatment of Bell palsy. There was insufficient evidence for recommendations on facial decompression surgery. [ ] In 2012, the AAN released guidelines stating that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (...) mentioned, 2012 guidelines from the AAN state that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) were issued in November 2013 that also support the AAN guidelines. The guidelines recommend use of corticosteroids within 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Antiviral agents (eg, acyclovir, valacyclovir) may

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Bell Palsy (Overview)

. This aberrant reconnection produces unusual neurologic pathways. When voluntary movements are initiated, they are accompanied by involuntary movements (eg, eye closure associated with lip pursing or mouth grimacing that occurs during blinking of the eye). The condition in which involuntary movements accompany voluntary movements is termed synkinesis. Previous References Baugh RF, Basura GJ, Ishii LE, Schwartz SR, Drumheller CM, Burkholder R, et al. Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy Executive Summary (...) . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2013 Nov. 149(5):656-63. . Gronseth GS, Paduga R. Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology . 2012 Nov 27. 79(22):2209-13. . Vrabec JT, Backous DD, Djalilian HR, Gidley PW, Leonetti JP, Marzo SJ, et al. Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009 Apr. 140(4):445-50. . Seiff SR, Chang J. Management of ophthalmic complications

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Bell Palsy (Overview)

. This aberrant reconnection produces unusual neurologic pathways. When voluntary movements are initiated, they are accompanied by involuntary movements (eg, eye closure associated with lip pursing or mouth grimacing that occurs during blinking of the eye). The condition in which involuntary movements accompany voluntary movements is termed synkinesis. Previous References Baugh RF, Basura GJ, Ishii LE, Schwartz SR, Drumheller CM, Burkholder R, et al. Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy Executive Summary (...) . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2013 Nov. 149(5):656-63. . Gronseth GS, Paduga R. Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology . 2012 Nov 27. 79(22):2209-13. . Vrabec JT, Backous DD, Djalilian HR, Gidley PW, Leonetti JP, Marzo SJ, et al. Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009 Apr. 140(4):445-50. . Seiff SR, Chang J. Management of ophthalmic complications

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Bell Palsy

unusual neurologic pathways. When voluntary movements are initiated, they are accompanied by involuntary movements (eg, eye closure associated with lip pursing or mouth grimacing that occurs during blinking of the eye). The condition in which involuntary movements accompany voluntary movements is termed synkinesis. Previous References Baugh RF, Basura GJ, Ishii LE, Schwartz SR, Drumheller CM, Burkholder R, et al. Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy Executive Summary. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg (...) . 2013 Nov. 149(5):656-63. . Gronseth GS, Paduga R. Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology . 2012 Nov 27. 79(22):2209-13. . Vrabec JT, Backous DD, Djalilian HR, Gidley PW, Leonetti JP, Marzo SJ, et al. Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009 Apr. 140(4):445-50. . Seiff SR, Chang J. Management of ophthalmic complications of facial nerve palsy

2014 eMedicine Surgery

19. Bell Palsy (Treatment)

parameter in 2001 stating that steroids are probably effective and acyclovir (with prednisone) is possibly effective for the treatment of Bell palsy. There was insufficient evidence for recommendations on facial decompression surgery. [ ] In 2012, the AAN released guidelines stating that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery (...) mentioned, 2012 guidelines from the AAN state that steroids are highly likely to be effective and increase the likelihood of recovery of facial nerve function in new-onset Bell palsy [ , ] Guidelines from the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) were issued in November 2013 that also support the AAN guidelines. The guidelines recommend use of corticosteroids within 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Antiviral agents (eg, acyclovir, valacyclovir) may

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

20. Bell Palsy (Diagnosis)

. This aberrant reconnection produces unusual neurologic pathways. When voluntary movements are initiated, they are accompanied by involuntary movements (eg, eye closure associated with lip pursing or mouth grimacing that occurs during blinking of the eye). The condition in which involuntary movements accompany voluntary movements is termed synkinesis. Previous References Baugh RF, Basura GJ, Ishii LE, Schwartz SR, Drumheller CM, Burkholder R, et al. Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy Executive Summary (...) . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2013 Nov. 149(5):656-63. . Gronseth GS, Paduga R. Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology . 2012 Nov 27. 79(22):2209-13. . Vrabec JT, Backous DD, Djalilian HR, Gidley PW, Leonetti JP, Marzo SJ, et al. Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009 Apr. 140(4):445-50. . Seiff SR, Chang J. Management of ophthalmic complications

2014 eMedicine.com

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