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101. Antibiotic prophylaxis for episiotomy repair following vaginal birth. Full Text available with Trip Pro

(e.g. endometritis) were reported in either the antibiotic or control group.The trial did not report on any of the secondary outcomes of interest for this review, including severe maternal infectious morbidity, discomfort or pain at the episiotomy wound site, sexual function postpartum, adverse effects of antibiotics, costs of care, women's satisfaction with care, and individual antimicrobial resistance.There was insufficient evidence to assess the clinical benefits or harms of routine antibiotic (...) Antibiotic prophylaxis for episiotomy repair following vaginal birth. Bacterial infections occurring during labour, childbirth, and the puerperium may be associated with considerable maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Antibiotic prophylaxis might reduce wound infection incidence after an episiotomy, particularly in situations associated with a higher risk of postpartum perineal infection, such as midline episiotomy, extension of the incision, or in settings where the baseline risk

2017 Cochrane

102. Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal delivery. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal delivery. Vacuum and forceps assisted vaginal deliveries are reported to increase the incidence of postpartum infections and maternal readmission to hospital compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery. Prophylactic antibiotics may be prescribed to prevent these infections. However, the benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal deliveries is still unclear.To assess the effectiveness and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing (...) infectious puerperal morbidities in women undergoing operative vaginal deliveries including vacuum or forceps deliveries, or both.We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (12 July 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (12 July 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies.All randomised trials comparing any prophylactic antibiotic regimens with placebo or no treatment in women undergoing vacuum or forceps deliveries were

2017 Cochrane

103. Systemic antibiotics for treating malignant wounds. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Systemic antibiotics for treating malignant wounds. Malignant wounds are a devastating complication of cancer. They usually develop in the last six months of life, in the breast, chest wall or head and neck regions. They are very difficult to treat successfully, and the commonly associated symptoms of pain, exudate, malodour, and the risk of haemorrhage are extremely distressing for those with advanced cancer. Treatment and care of malignant wounds is primarily palliative, and focuses (...) on alleviating pain, controlling infection and odour from the wound, managing exudate and protecting the surrounding skin from further deterioration. In malignant wounds, with tissue degradation and death, there is proliferation of both anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. The aim of antibiotic therapy is to successfully eliminate these bacteria, reduce associated symptoms, such as odour, and promote wound healing.To assess the effects of systemic antibiotics for treating malignant wounds.We searched

2017 Cochrane

104. Antimicrobial stewardship intervention: optimizing antibiotic treatment in hospitalized patients with reported antibiotic allergy. (Abstract)

Antimicrobial stewardship intervention: optimizing antibiotic treatment in hospitalized patients with reported antibiotic allergy. Reported antibiotic allergy in hospitalized patients seems to be related to more adverse events, the use of reserve antibiotics and longer hospitalization. Most patients reporting an antibiotic allergy can be de-labelled; as such, an antimicrobial stewardship intervention was set up.To determine the impact of reported antibiotic allergy on the antibiotic treatment (...) of hospitalized patients, and prevent unnecessary deviation from the preferred antibiotic treatment by a proactive antimicrobial stewardship intervention.Hospitalized patients reporting an antibiotic allergy were included in an intervention study at a teaching hospital in the Netherlands between March and May 2019. Physicians received training and were provided with a recommendation in the electronic medical record in case the preferred antibiotic treatment was unnecessarily avoided due to the allergy label

2020 Journal of Hospital Infection

105. Impetigo: antimicrobial prescribing

T erms used in the guideline 11 Recommendation for research 13 1 Antiseptics compared with antibiotics for impetigo 13 Rationales 14 Advice to reduce the spread of impetigo 14 Initial treatment 14 Reassessment and further treatment 16 Referral and seeking specialist advice 17 Choice of antimicrobial 18 Context 21 Summary of the evidence 22 Antimicrobials 22 Choice of antibiotics 23 Course length 25 Route of administration 25 Other considerations 27 Medicines safety 27 Medicines adherence 27 (...) Resource implications 27 Impetigo: antimicrobial prescribing (NG153) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 28Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over with impetigo. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. For managing other skin and soft tissue infections, see our web pages

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

106. Human and animal bites: antimicrobial prescribing

and committee details 27 Human and animal bites: antimicrobial prescribing (NG184) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 27Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for human and animal bites (excluding insect bites) in adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary (...) ), that you are unfamiliar with. For a short explanation of why the committee made these recommendations, see the rationale section on assessment. For more details, see the evidence review. Human and animal bites: antimicrobial prescribing (NG184) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 5 of 27Antibiotic prophylaxis for uninfected bites Antibiotic prophylaxis for uninfected bites Human bites Human bites 1.1.4 Do

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

107. Insect bites and stings: antimicrobial prescribing

bites and stings 5 T erms used in the guideline 7 Rationales 9 Assessment and advice 9 Treatment 9 Referral and seeking specialist advice 10 Context 12 Summary of the evidence 13 Antibiotics for infected arthropod bites in adults 13 Oral antihistamines for uninfected mosquito bites in adults 14 Antihistamines for uninfected mosquito bites in children 15 Treatments for uninfected brown recluse spider bites 15 Insect bites and stings: antimicrobial prescribing (NG182) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved (...) . Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 16Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for insect and spider bites and stings in adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over, including those that occurred while travelling outside the UK. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 1-page visual summary of the recommendations. The recommendations in this guideline

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

108. Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing

26 Medicines safety 26 Medicines adherence 27 Resource implications 27 Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing (NG152) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 28Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults with leg ulcer infection. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary (...) antibiotic use. 1.1.4 Give oral antibiotics if the person can take oral medicines, and the severity of their condition does not require intravenous antibiotics. 1.1.5 If intravenous antibiotics are given, review by 48 hours and consider switching to oral antibiotics if possible. T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on treatment for adults with an infected leg ulcer, see the rationales. Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing (NG152) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

109. Probiotics for Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhoea (PAAD): a prospective observational study of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (including Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea) in care homes Full Text available with Trip Pro

Probiotics for Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhoea (PAAD): a prospective observational study of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (including Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea) in care homes Probiotics for Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhoea (PAAD): a prospective observational study of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (including Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea) in care homes Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content

2014 NIHR HTA programme

110. General medicine: Antibiotic prescribing does not decrease complications in adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections

General medicine: Antibiotic prescribing does not decrease complications in adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections Antibiotic prescribing does not decrease complications in adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using (...) your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Antibiotic prescribing does not decrease complications in adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections Article Text Commentary General

2018 Evidence-Based Medicine

111. Antimicrobial stewardship: Systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use within human health and healthcare in New Zealand

and Contextualisation Group (GRCG) for each guideline. The GRCG will carefully consider the NICE guideline recommendations, taking into account the differences between the UK and New Zealand health care systems to produce a guideline that is relevant to those delivering and managing care in New Zealand. The development of a profusion of antimicrobial medicines since the middle of the twentieth century has been one of the greatest advances of medical science. Antibiotic therapy has reduced the mortality (...) ‘antimicrobial resistance’ is defined as the ‘loss of effectiveness of any anti infective medicine, including antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines’. Antimicrobials and antimicrobial medicines The term ‘antimicrobials’ and ‘antimicrobial medicines’ includes all anti infective therapies, (antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines) and all formulations (oral, parenteral and topical agents). Organisations The term ‘organisations’ (also known as the ‘service

2017 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

112. Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes

Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e207–e212 No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes x Mark H. Yudin , MD Toronto, ON x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 233, September 2017 (...) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on the use of antibiotics in preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM). Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include the effect of antibiotic treatment on maternal infection, chorioamnionitis, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

113. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures

Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures No. 247-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e293–e299 No. 247-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 247, September 2017 DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full (...) text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for obstetrical procedures. Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in obstetrical procedures. Evidence Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Library on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical procedures. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

114. Primary care: Trimethoprim is associated with a greater risk of acute kidney injury and hyperkalaemia in older adults compared with other antibiotics used to treat UTIs

Primary care: Trimethoprim is associated with a greater risk of acute kidney injury and hyperkalaemia in older adults compared with other antibiotics used to treat UTIs Trimethoprim is associated with a greater risk of acute kidney injury and hyperkalaemia in older adults compared with other antibiotics used to treat UTIs | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser (...) injury and hyperkalaemia in older adults compared with other antibiotics used to treat UTIs Article Text Commentary Primary care Trimethoprim is associated with a greater risk of acute kidney injury and hyperkalaemia in older adults compared with other antibiotics used to treat UTIs Oghenekome Gbinigie Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on : Crellin E, Mansfield KE, Leyrat C, et al . Trimethoprim use for urinary tract infection and risk of adverse outcomes in older patients: cohort study. BMJ

2018 Evidence-Based Medicine

115. Cystitis: taking an antibiotic

Cystitis: taking an antibiotic Decision aid for cystitis: taking an antibiotic © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights. Last updated November 2018 Page 1 of 2 Decision aid Cystitis: taking an antibiotic Information to help women who are not pregnant discuss the options with their healthcare professionals. Cystitis is usually caused by bacteria (germs) from your gut getting into your bladder (also called lower urinary tract infection, UTI). Sometimes symptoms get better (...) by themselves, but many people will need antibiotic treatment. What are the options? It’s not always clear when an antibiotic is needed so, for some women with cystitis, NICE recommends that you could either: ? start taking an antibiotic straightaway, or ? wait, and see if your symptoms start to get better by themselves. If they don’t get better within 48 hours, or get worse at any time, you should start taking the antibiotic. You can choose whether to wait and see if your symptoms improve on their own

2018 Health Information and Quality Authority

116. Community and primary care nursing: Increased risk of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection among older adults taking antibiotics and acid reducing medications

Community and primary care nursing: Increased risk of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection among older adults taking antibiotics and acid reducing medications Increased risk of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection among older adults taking antibiotics and acid reducing medications | Evidence-Based Nursing Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search (...) for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Increased risk of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection among older adults taking antibiotics and acid reducing medications Article Text Commentary Community and primary care nursing Increased risk of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection among older adults taking antibiotics and acid reducing medications Terri Kean

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

117. Antibiotics in Acute Uncomplicated Diverticulitis

Antibiotics in Acute Uncomplicated Diverticulitis Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > March 2016 Toggle navigation March 2016 Antibiotics in Acute Uncomplicated Diverticulitis Vignette You are halfway through an average weekday shift in EM-2 when you encounter a very pleasant 50-year-old gentleman with abdominal pain. He reports the pain began three days ago and has progressively worsened. It is a dull, moderate pain located in the left lower quadrant with no radiation. He denies (...) check basic labs and order a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis with IV contrast. His WBC is 14K and his CT reveals uncomplicated sigmoid diverticulitis without perforation of abscess formation. As you are ordering antibiotics, you remember seeing a recent article in suggesting that antibiotics may not actually be necessary to treat diverticulitis. You had previously scoffed at the suggestion and tossed the magazine in the trash, but now wonder if the assertion was based on real science. Aware

2017 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

118. Topical Antibiotics for Infected Dermatitis: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Topical Antibiotics for Infected Dermatitis: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Topical Antibiotics for Infected Dermatitis: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Topical Antibiotics for Infected Dermatitis: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Topical Antibiotics for Infected Dermatitis: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: March 3, 2017 Project Number: RC0852-000 Product (...) Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of topical antibiotics for patients with infected dermatitis? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of topical antibiotics for the treatment of infected dermatitis? Key Message Evidence to date suggests that topical antibiotics provide no additional benefits when added to other topical treatments in both children and adults with clinically

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

119. Topical Antibiotics for Infection Prevention: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Topical Antibiotics for Infection Prevention: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Topical Antibiotics for Infection Prevention: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Topical Antibiotics for Infection Prevention: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Topical Antibiotics for Infection Prevention: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: March 30, 2017 Project Number: RC0854-000 (...) Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of topical antibiotics for patients to prevent skin or wound infection? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of topical antibiotics for the prevention of skin or wound infection? Key Message Two systematic reviews and one non-randomized study showed that in non-surgical patients, exit site infection rates were statistically significantly

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

120. Antibiotics for Acute Asthma Exacerbations: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines

Antibiotics for Acute Asthma Exacerbations: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines Antibiotics for Acute Asthma Exacerbations: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Antibiotics for Acute Asthma Exacerbations: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines Antibiotics for Acute Asthma Exacerbations: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines Published on: March 23, 2017 Project Number (...) : RB1076-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of antibiotics for acute asthma exacerbations without clear signs of bacterial infection? What is the cost-effectiveness of antibiotics for acute asthma exacerbations without clear signs of bacterial infection? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of antibiotics for acute asthma exacerbations? Key Message Three randomized-control trials

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

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