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21. Antibiotic treatment for Burkholderia cepacia complex in people with cystic fibrosis experiencing a pulmonary exacerbation. (Abstract)

Antibiotic treatment for Burkholderia cepacia complex in people with cystic fibrosis experiencing a pulmonary exacerbation. Chronic pulmonary infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Infections dominated by organisms of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of at least 18 closely-related species of gram-negative bacteria, are particularly difficult to treat. These infections may be associated with a fulminant necrotising pneumonia. Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria (...) are resistant to many common antibiotics and able to acquire resistance against many more. Following patient segregation in cystic fibrosis medical care, the more virulent epidemic strains are not as frequent, and new infections are more likely to be with less virulent environmentally-acquired strains. Although evidence-based guidelines exist for treating respiratory exacerbations involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa, these cannot be extended to Burkholderia cepacia complex infections. This review, which

2020 Cochrane

22. Antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of postoperative wound infection in adults undergoing open elective inguinal or femoral hernia repair. (Abstract)

Antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of postoperative wound infection in adults undergoing open elective inguinal or femoral hernia repair. Inguinal or femoral hernia is a tissue protrusion in the groin region and has a cumulative incidence of 27% in adult men and of 3% in adult women. As most hernias become symptomatic over time, groin hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide. This type of surgery is considered 'clean' surgery with wound infection (...) rates expected to be lower than 5%. For clean surgical procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis is not generally recommended. However after the introduction of mesh-based hernia repair and the publication of studies that have high wound infection rates the debate as to whether antibiotic prophylaxis is required to prevent postoperative wound infections started again.To determine the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing postoperative (superficial and deep) wound infections in elective open

2020 Cochrane

23. Antibiotic treatment for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in people with cystic fibrosis. (Abstract)

Antibiotic treatment for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in people with cystic fibrosis. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is one of the most common emerging multi-drug resistant organisms found in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis and its prevalence is increasing. Chronic infection with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has recently been shown to be an independent predictor of pulmonary exacerbation requiring hospitalization and antibiotics. However, the role of antibiotic treatment (...) of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection in people with cystic fibrosis is still unclear. This is an update of a previously published review.The objective of our review is to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in people with cystic fibrosis. The primary objective is to assess this in relation to lung function and pulmonary exacerbations in the setting of acute pulmonary exacerbations. The secondary objective is to assess this in relation to the eradication

2020 Cochrane

24. The Community IntraVenous Antibiotic Study (CIVAS): a mixed-methods evaluation of patient preferences for and cost-effectiveness of different service models for delivering outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Community IntraVenous Antibiotic Study (CIVAS): a mixed-methods evaluation of patient preferences for and cost-effectiveness of different service models for delivering outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy The Community IntraVenous Antibiotic Study (CIVAS): a mixed-methods evaluation of patient preferences for and cost-effectiveness of different service models for delivering outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display (...) , please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} There is major variability in Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy services in England; most patients would prefer home treatment, where a visiting specialist nurse service

2017 NIHR HTA programme

25. Triple Antibiotic Solution Promotes Similar Antibacterial Effects as Calcium Hydroxide/2% Chlorhexidine When Used as an Intracanal Medicament

instrumentation and/or irrigation, are effective in canal disinfection. The intracanal antimicrobial efficacy of triple antibiotic formulation is shown to be superior to calcium hydroxide alone, or at least comparable to calcium hydroxide combined with 2% chlorhexidine when assessing antibacterial efficacy and clinical outcomes. Perspective: Randomized clinical trials are currently the highest available evidence comparing use of triple antibiotic paste against other canal medicaments in primary teeth (...) Triple Antibiotic Solution Promotes Similar Antibacterial Effects as Calcium Hydroxide/2% Chlorhexidine When Used as an Intracanal Medicament UTCAT3361, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Triple Antibiotic Solution Promotes Similar Antibacterial Effects as Calcium Hydroxide/2% Chlorhexidine When Used as an Intracanal Medicament Clinical Question In patients undergoing non-surgical therapy in a tooth

2018 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

26. What is the evidence for use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of COVID-19?

that has complicated COVID-19, we recognise that clinicians may wish to prescribe macrolide antibiotics, in line with their local/national antimicrobial guidelines. End. Disclaimer : This article has not been peer-reviewed; it should not replace individual clinical judgement and the sources cited should be checked. The views expressed in this commentary represent the views of the authors and not necessarily those of the host institution, the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health and Social Care (...) What is the evidence for use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of COVID-19? What is the evidence for use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of COVID-19? - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website What is the evidence for use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of COVID-19? April 28, 2020 Kome Gbinigie and Kerstin Frie On behalf of the Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service Team Centre

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

27. Do Antibiotics Improve Outcomes in Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Do Antibiotics Improve Outcomes in Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations? Do Antibiotics Improve Outcomes in Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 74, Issue 5, Pages 711–712 Do Antibiotics Improve Outcomes in Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations? x Latha Ganti , MD, MBA (EBEM Commentator) , x Javier Rosario , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department (...) of Emergency Medicine, Envision Physician Services, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, FL DOI: | Publication History Published online: April 11, 2019 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message Moderate- to low-quality evidence suggests that antibiotics may reduce symptoms and improve pulmonary function but do not improve other outcomes in patients with acute asthma exacerbations. Methods Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health

2020 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

28. What Is the Utility of Prophylactic Antibiotics for Patients After Cardiac Arrest? Full Text available with Trip Pro

on Resuscitation; the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee; the Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia; the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Perioperative, and Critical Care; the Council on Clinical Cardiology; the Council on Stroke. Resuscitation . 2008 ; 79 : 350–379 | | | | | Consequently, prophylactic antibiotics may seem reasonable in this population. However, it is important to balance this against the need for antimicrobial stewardship. Although this study demonstrated (...) What Is the Utility of Prophylactic Antibiotics for Patients After Cardiac Arrest? What Is the Utility of Prophylactic Antibiotics for Patients After Cardiac Arrest? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 75, Issue 1, Pages 102–104 What Is the Utility of Prophylactic Antibiotics for Patients After Cardiac Arrest? x Michael Gottlieb , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Trevor Landas , MD (EBEM

2020 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

29. Do Antibiotics Improve Patient Outcomes in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Do Antibiotics Improve Patient Outcomes in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Do Antibiotics Improve Patient Outcomes in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 74, Issue 5, Pages e79–e81 Do Antibiotics Improve Patient Outcomes in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? x Brit Long (...) , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Michael D. April , MD, DPhil (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Fort Sam Houston, TX DOI: | Publication History Published online: February 14, 2019 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message For patients with acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, antibiotics reduce treatment failure for those with mild to moderate exacerbations. Antibiotics reduce mortality

2020 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

30. Cefiderocol (Fetcroja) - antibiotic

Cefiderocol (Fetcroja) - antibiotic Official address Domenico Scarlattilaan 6 ? 1083 HS Amsterdam ? The Netherlands An agency of the European Union Address for visits and deliveries Refer to www.ema.europa.eu/how-to-find-us Send us a question Go to www.ema.europa.eu/contact Telephone +31 (0)88 781 6000 © European Medicines Agency, 2020. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. EMA/115665/2020 EMEA/H/C/004829 Fetcroja (cefiderocol) An overview of Fetcroja and why (...) it is authorised in the EU What is Fetcroja and what is it used for? Fetcroja is an antibiotic used in adults to treat infections caused by bacteria classed as aerobic Gram- negative bacteria. It is for use when other treatments might not work. Fetcroja contains the active substance cefiderocol. How is Fetcroja used? Fetcroja can only be obtained with a prescription. It should only be used after taking advice from a doctor with appropriate experience of managing patients with infectious diseases. Fetcroja

2020 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

31. Antibiotics for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotics for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. The clinical presentation of acute chest syndrome is similar whether due to infectious or non-infectious causes, thus antibiotics are usually prescribed to treat all episodes. Many different pathogens, including bacteria, have been implicated as causative agents of acute chest syndrome. There is no standardized approach to antibiotic therapy and treatment is likely to vary from country to country. Thus (...) , there is a need to identify the efficacy and safety of different antibiotic treatment approaches for people with sickle cell disease suffering from acute chest syndrome. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2007, and most recently updated in 2015.To determine whether an empirical antibiotic treatment approach (used alone or in combination):1. is effective for acute chest syndrome compared to placebo or standard treatment;2. is safe for acute chest syndrome compared to placebo or standard

2019 Cochrane

32. Antibiotics for trachoma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, and it was difficult to judge risk of bias.There was low-certainty evidence of little or no difference in effect between oral and topical antibiotics on active trachoma at three months (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.16; 953 people; 6 RCTs; I2 = 63%) and 12 months (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.15; 886 people; 5 RCTs; I2 = 56%). There was very low-certainty evidence for ocular infection at three or 12 months. Antimicrobial resistance was not assessed. In those studies that reported adverse effects, no serious adverse (...) Antibiotics for trachoma. Trachoma is the world's leading infectious cause of blindness. In 1996, WHO launched the Alliance for the Global Elimination of Trachoma by the year 2020, based on the 'SAFE' strategy (surgery, antibiotics, facial cleanliness, and environmental improvement).To assess the evidence supporting the antibiotic arm of the SAFE strategy by assessing the effects of antibiotics on both active trachoma (primary objective), Chlamydia trachomatis infection of the conjunctiva

2019 Cochrane

33. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infection after breast cancer surgery. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infection after breast cancer surgery. Surgery has been used as part of breast cancer treatment for centuries; however any surgical procedure has the potential risk of infection. Infection rates for surgical treatment of breast cancer are documented at between 3% and 15%, higher than average for a clean surgical procedure. Pre- and perioperative antibiotics have been found to be useful in lowering infection rates in other surgical groups, yet (...) there is no consensus on the use of prophylactic antibiotics for breast cancer surgery. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2005 and last updated in 2014.To determine the effects of prophylactic (pre- or perioperative) antibiotics on the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after breast cancer surgery.For this fourth update, in August 2018 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process

2019 Cochrane

34. Antibiotics for treating osteomyelitis in people with sickle cell disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotics for treating osteomyelitis in people with sickle cell disease. Osteomyelitis (both acute and chronic) is one of the most common infectious complications in people with sickle cell disease. There is no standardized approach to antibiotic therapy and treatment is likely to vary from country to country. Thus, there is a need to identify the efficacy and safety of different antibiotic treatment approaches for people with sickle cell disease suffering from osteomyelitis (...) . This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review.To determine whether an empirical antibiotic treatment approach (monotherapy or combination therapy) is effective and safe as compared to pathogen-directed antibiotic treatment and whether this effectiveness and safety is dependent on different treatment regimens, age or setting.We searched The Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearching of relevant

2019 Cochrane

35. Duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy in people with cystic fibrosis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy in people with cystic fibrosis. Progressive lung damage from recurrent exacerbations is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in cystic fibrosis. Life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis has increased dramatically in the last 40 years. One of the major reasons for this increase is the mounting use of antibiotics to treat chest exacerbations caused by bacterial infections. The optimal duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy is not clearly (...) defined. Individuals usually receive intravenous antibiotics for 14 days, but treatment may range from 10 to 21 days. A shorter duration of antibiotic treatment risks inadequate clearance of infection which could lead to further lung damage. Prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics are expensive and inconvenient. The risk of systemic side effects such as allergic reactions to antibiotics also increases with prolonged courses and the use of aminoglycosides requires frequent monitoring to minimise

2019 Cochrane

36. Antibiotics after incision and drainage for uncomplicated skin abscesses Full Text available with Trip Pro

of adverse effects including nausea and diarrhoea We suggest TMP-SMX rather than clindamycin because TMP-SMX has a lower risk of diarrhoea Cephalosporins in addition to incision and drainage are probably not more effective than incision and drainage alone in most settings From a societal perspective, the modest benefits from adjuvant antibiotics may not outweigh the harms from increased antimicrobial resistance in the community, although this is speculative Box 1 Linked articles in this BMJ Rapid (...) are likely to prefer TMP-SMX. Person-centred versus societal perspective (impact on antibiotic resistance) The recommendations explicitly take a person-centred perspective rather than a public health or societal perspective. The use of antibiotics is associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance within the community and may increase the risk of antibiotic resistant infections in community members. The increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance are a public health priority. From a societal

2018 BMJ Rapid Recommendations

37. Prophylactic antibiotics for penetrating abdominal trauma. (Abstract)

Prophylactic antibiotics for penetrating abdominal trauma. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs when the peritoneal cavity is breached. Routine laparotomy for penetrating abdominal injuries began in the 1800s, with antibiotics first being used in World War II to combat septic complications associated with these injuries. This practice was marked with a reduction in sepsis-related mortality and morbidity. Whether prophylactic antibiotics are required in the prevention of infective complications (...) following penetrating abdominal trauma is controversial, however, as no randomised placebo controlled trials have been published to date. There has also been debate about the timing of antibiotic prophylaxis. In 1972 Fullen noted a 7% to 11% post-surgical infection rate with pre-operative antibiotics, a 33% to 57% infection rate with intra-operative antibiotic administration and 30% to 70% infection rate with only post-operative antibiotic administration. Current guidelines state there is sufficient

2019 Cochrane

38. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis. Irreversible pulpitis, which is characterised by acute and intense pain, is one of the most frequent reasons that patients attend for emergency dental care. Apart from removal of the tooth, the customary way of relieving the pain of irreversible pulpitis is by drilling into the tooth, removing the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. However, a significant number of dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics to stop the pain (...) of irreversible pulpitis.This review updates the previous version published in 2016.To assess the effects of systemic antibiotics for irreversible pulpitis.We searched Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 18 February 2019); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2019, Issue 1) in the Cochrane Library (searched 18 February 2019); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 18 February 2019); Embase Ovid (1980 to 18 February 2019); US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register

2019 Cochrane

39. Antibiotic therapy for chronic infection with Burkholderia cepacia complex in people with cystic fibrosis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic therapy for chronic infection with Burkholderia cepacia complex in people with cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis (CF) a life-limiting inherited disease affecting a number of organs, but classically associated with chronic lung infection and progressive loss of lung function. Chronic infection by Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and therefore represents a significant challenge to clinicians treating people with CF. This review (...) examines the current evidence for long-term antibiotic therapy in people with CF and chronic BCC infection.The objective of this review is to assess the effects of long-term oral and inhaled antibiotic therapy targeted against chronic BCC lung infections in people with CF. The primary objective is to assess the efficacy of treatments in terms of improvements in lung function and reductions in exacerbation rate. Secondary objectives include quantifying adverse events, mortality and changes in quality

2019 Cochrane

40. Head-to-head oral prophylactic antibiotic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Head-to-head oral prophylactic antibiotic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; including chronic bronchitis and emphysema) is a chronic respiratory condition characterised by shortness of breath, cough and recurrent exacerbations. Long-term antibiotic use may reduce both bacterial load and inflammation in the airways. Studies have shown a reduction of exacerbations with antibiotics in comparison to placebo in people with COPD (...) , but there are concerns about antibiotic resistance and safety.To compare the safety and efficacy of different classes of antibiotics (continuous, intermittent or pulsed) for prophylaxis of exacerbations in patients with COPD.We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Trials Register and bibliographies of relevant studies. The latest literature search was conducted on 6 February 2019.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were selected that compared one prophylactic antibiotic with another in patients with COPD.We used

2019 Cochrane

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