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1. Antibiotic awareness: important messages on antibiotic use

Antibiotic awareness: important messages on antibiotic use Antibiotic awareness: important messages on antibiotic use - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Antibiotic awareness: important messages (...) on antibiotic use This document explains how to use antibiotics responsibly for patients, animal keepers, pet owners and prescribers. Published 23 September 2014 Last updated 7 October 2019 — From: Documents Ref: PHE publication gateway reference: GW-779 If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Details PHE has

2019 Public Health England

2. There?s Pus About, So Are Antibiotics In or Out? Adding antibiotics for abscess management

There?s Pus About, So Are Antibiotics In or Out? Adding antibiotics for abscess management Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 5,000 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care (...) research. www.acfp.ca January 21, 2019 There’s Pus About, So Are Antibiotics In or Out? Adding antibiotics for abscess management Clinical Question: Does the addition of antibiotics to incision and drainage improve cure rates in single, uncomplicated skin abscesses? Bottom Line: Adding antibiotics that cover MRSA during incision and drainage for a small abscess increases the cure rate from 85% to 92%, meaning an additional one in 15 patients will be cured compared to placebo at one month. Approximately

2019 Tools for Practice

3. Antibiotic prescribing - especially broad spectrum antibiotics

Antibiotic prescribing - especially broad spectrum antibiotics Antimicrobial stewardship: prescribing Antimicrobial stewardship: prescribing antibiotics antibiotics Key therapeutic topic Published: 15 January 2015 nice.org.uk/guidance/ktt9 pathways K Ke ey points y points Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant global threat to public health, especially because antimicrobials underpin routine medical practice. Addressing antimicrobial resistance through improving stewardship is a national (...) medicines optimisation priority that is led by NHS England and supported by Public Health England (PHE) and the work of the Regional Medicines Optimisation Committees (RMOCs). NICE, in collaboration with PHE, is developing clinical syndrome-specific guidance and advice, which offer evidence-based antimicrobial prescribing information for all care settings to help slow the development of antimicrobial resistances. A national programme to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is in place through

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

4. Cohort study: Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children

Cohort study: Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please (...) see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

5. Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections

Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections Discover Portal Discover Portal Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections Published on 17 October 2017 doi: Antibiotic stewardship programmes could halve the number of infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria compared with unguided prescribing. Combining these programmes with hand hygiene (...) , such as washing hands with soap and water and using alcohol-based hand-rubs, could reduce antibiotic resistance further. Bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics is increasing, and for some conditions, there aren’t enough new antibiotics available to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria. Antibiotic stewardship involves promoting the appropriate use of antibiotics according to local resistance patterns and aims to give patients the right antibiotics for the right length of time and at the correct

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

6. A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use

A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use Discover Portal Discover Portal A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use Published on 19 December 2017 doi: Delaying antibiotic prescribing made little difference to most symptoms of respiratory infection. It reduced antibiotic use and did (...) not affect patient satisfaction compared with immediate prescribing of antibiotics. Increasing antibiotic resistance is a global health concern. Many people don’t realise that viruses cause most respiratory infections and that antibiotics won’t help. The strategy allows some time for symptoms to improve naturally. This review of the latest evidence on delayed prescribing for self-limiting respiratory infections is in line with current guidance. On the whole delaying antibiotics made little difference

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

7. A randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral and topical antibiotics for children with clinically infected eczema in the community: the ChildRen with Eczema, Antibiotic Management (CREAM) study

A randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral and topical antibiotics for children with clinically infected eczema in the community: the ChildRen with Eczema, Antibiotic Management (CREAM) study A randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral and topical antibiotics for children with clinically infected eczema in the community: the ChildRen with Eczema, Antibiotic Management (CREAM) study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found

2016 NIHR HTA programme

8. Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections

Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections Discover Portal Discover Portal Carefully managed antibiotic use could halve antibiotic-resistant infections Published on 17 October 2017 doi: Antibiotic stewardship programmes could halve the number of infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria compared with unguided prescribing. Combining these programmes with hand hygiene (...) , such as washing hands with soap and water and using alcohol-based hand-rubs, could reduce antibiotic resistance further. Bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics is increasing, and for some conditions, there aren’t enough new antibiotics available to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria. Antibiotic stewardship involves promoting the appropriate use of antibiotics according to local resistance patterns and aims to give patients the right antibiotics for the right length of time and at the correct

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

9. A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use

A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use Discover Portal Discover Portal A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use Published on 19 December 2017 doi: Delaying antibiotic prescribing made little difference to most symptoms of respiratory infection. It reduced antibiotic use and did (...) not affect patient satisfaction compared with immediate prescribing of antibiotics. Increasing antibiotic resistance is a global health concern. Many people don’t realise that viruses cause most respiratory infections and that antibiotics won’t help. The strategy allows some time for symptoms to improve naturally. This review of the latest evidence on delayed prescribing for self-limiting respiratory infections is in line with current guidance. On the whole delaying antibiotics made little difference

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

10. Continuous low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection in adults who perform clean intermittent self-catheterisation: the AnTIC RCT

Continuous low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection in adults who perform clean intermittent self-catheterisation: the AnTIC RCT Continuous low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection in adults who perform clean intermittent self-catheterisation: the AnTIC RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please (...) choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Continuous low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis reduced the frequency of symptomatic, antibiotic-treated urinary tract infection by 48%, although antimicrobial resistance of bacteria isolated from the urine of those taking prophylaxis increased. {{author}} {{($index

2018 NIHR HTA programme

11. Adverse events in people taking macrolide antibiotics versus placebo for any indication. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Adverse events in people taking macrolide antibiotics versus placebo for any indication. Macrolide antibiotics (macrolides) are among the most commonly prescribed antibiotics worldwide and are used for a wide range of infections. However, macrolides also expose people to the risk of adverse events. The current understanding of adverse events is mostly derived from observational studies, which are subject to bias because it is hard to distinguish events caused by antibiotics from events caused (...) by the diseases being treated. Because adverse events are treatment-specific, rather than disease-specific, it is possible to increase the number of adverse events available for analysis by combining randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of the same treatment across different diseases.To quantify the incidences of reported adverse events in people taking macrolide antibiotics compared to placebo for any indication.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which includes

2019 Cochrane

12. Antibiotics for treating urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in men and non-pregnant women. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotics for treating urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in men and non-pregnant women. The genital infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally. The infection is mainly asymptomatic in women, thus it can produce infertility and chronic pelvic pain. In men infection is mainly symptomatic, but can evolve to prostatitis. Clinical practice guidelines for CT urogenital infections do not give any specific recommendation about (...) which antibiotic use as first option OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatment for CT genital infection in men and non-pregnant women.The Cochrane Sexually Transmitted Infections' (STI) Information Specialist developed the electronic searches in electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS), and trials registers. We searched studies published from inception to June 2018.We included parallel, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of men, and sexually-active, non

2019 Cochrane

13. Antibiotics for induction and maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotics for induction and maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease. Several antibiotics have been evaluated in Crohn's disease (CD), however randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have produced conflicting results.To assess the efficacy and safety of antibiotics for induction and maintenance of remission in CD.We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register and Clinicaltrials.gov database from inception to 28 February 2018. We also searched reference lists (...) and conference proceedings.RCTs comparing antibiotics to placebo or an active comparator in adult (> 15 years) CD patients were considered for inclusion.Two authors screened search results and extracted data. Bias was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The primary outcomes were failure to achieve clinical remission and relapse. Secondary outcomes included clinical response, endoscopic response, endoscopic remission, endoscopic relapse, histologic response, histologic remission, adverse events

2019 Cochrane

14. Early discontinuation of antibiotics for febrile neutropenia versus continuation until neutropenia resolution in people with cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Early discontinuation of antibiotics for febrile neutropenia versus continuation until neutropenia resolution in people with cancer. People with cancer with febrile neutropenia are at risk of severe infections and mortality and are thus treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. However, the recommended duration of antibiotic therapy differs across guidelines.To assess the safety of protocol-guided discontinuation of antibiotics regardless of neutrophil count, compared (...) to continuation of antibiotics until neutropenia resolution in people with cancer with fever and neutropenia, in terms of mortality and morbidity. To assess the emergence of resistant bacteria in people with cancer treated with short courses of antibiotic therapy compared with people with cancer treated until resolution of neutropenia.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2018, Issue 10) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS up to 1 October 2018. We searched

2019 Cochrane

15. Duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy in people with cystic fibrosis. (Abstract)

Duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy in people with cystic fibrosis. Progressive lung damage from recurrent exacerbations is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in cystic fibrosis. Life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis has increased dramatically in the last 40 years. One of the major reasons for this increase is the mounting use of antibiotics to treat chest exacerbations caused by bacterial infections. The optimal duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy is not clearly (...) defined. Individuals usually receive intravenous antibiotics for 14 days, but treatment may range from 10 to 21 days. A shorter duration of antibiotic treatment risks inadequate clearance of infection which could lead to further lung damage. Prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics are expensive and inconvenient. The risk of systemic side effects such as allergic reactions to antibiotics also increases with prolonged courses and the use of aminoglycosides requires frequent monitoring to minimise

2019 Cochrane

16. Antibiotics for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. (Abstract)

Antibiotics for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. The clinical presentation of acute chest syndrome is similar whether due to infectious or non-infectious causes, thus antibiotics are usually prescribed to treat all episodes. Many different pathogens, including bacteria, have been implicated as causative agents of acute chest syndrome. There is no standardized approach to antibiotic therapy and treatment is likely to vary from country to country. Thus (...) , there is a need to identify the efficacy and safety of different antibiotic treatment approaches for people with sickle cell disease suffering from acute chest syndrome. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2007, and most recently updated in 2015.To determine whether an empirical antibiotic treatment approach (used alone or in combination):1. is effective for acute chest syndrome compared to placebo or standard treatment;2. is safe for acute chest syndrome compared to placebo or standard

2019 Cochrane

17. Antibiotics for trachoma. (Abstract)

Antibiotics for trachoma. Trachoma is the world's leading infectious cause of blindness. In 1996, WHO launched the Alliance for the Global Elimination of Trachoma by the year 2020, based on the 'SAFE' strategy (surgery, antibiotics, facial cleanliness, and environmental improvement).To assess the evidence supporting the antibiotic arm of the SAFE strategy by assessing the effects of antibiotics on both active trachoma (primary objective), Chlamydia trachomatis infection of the conjunctiva (...) , antibiotic resistance, and adverse effects (secondary objectives).We searched relevant electronic databases and trials registers. The date of the last search was 4 January 2019.We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that satisfied either of two criteria: (a) trials in which topical or oral administration of an antibiotic was compared to placebo or no treatment in people or communities with trachoma, (b) trials in which a topical antibiotic was compared with an oral antibiotic in people

2019 Cochrane

18. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infection after breast cancer surgery. (Abstract)

Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infection after breast cancer surgery. Surgery has been used as part of breast cancer treatment for centuries; however any surgical procedure has the potential risk of infection. Infection rates for surgical treatment of breast cancer are documented at between 3% and 15%, higher than average for a clean surgical procedure. Pre- and perioperative antibiotics have been found to be useful in lowering infection rates in other surgical groups, yet (...) there is no consensus on the use of prophylactic antibiotics for breast cancer surgery. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2005 and last updated in 2014.To determine the effects of prophylactic (pre- or perioperative) antibiotics on the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after breast cancer surgery.For this fourth update, in August 2018 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process

2019 Cochrane

19. Antibiotics for treating osteomyelitis in people with sickle cell disease. (Abstract)

Antibiotics for treating osteomyelitis in people with sickle cell disease. Osteomyelitis (both acute and chronic) is one of the most common infectious complications in people with sickle cell disease. There is no standardized approach to antibiotic therapy and treatment is likely to vary from country to country. Thus, there is a need to identify the efficacy and safety of different antibiotic treatment approaches for people with sickle cell disease suffering from osteomyelitis (...) . This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review.To determine whether an empirical antibiotic treatment approach (monotherapy or combination therapy) is effective and safe as compared to pathogen-directed antibiotic treatment and whether this effectiveness and safety is dependent on different treatment regimens, age or setting.We searched The Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearching of relevant

2019 Cochrane

20. Antibiotic treatment for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in people with decompensated liver cirrhosis: a network meta-analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic treatment for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in people with decompensated liver cirrhosis: a network meta-analysis. Approximately 2.5% of all hospitalisations in people with cirrhosis are for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Antibiotics, in addition to supportive treatment (fluid and electrolyte balance, treatment of shock), form the mainstay treatments of SBP. Various antibiotics are available for the treatment of SBP, but there is uncertainty regarding the best (...) antibiotic for SBP.To compare the benefits and harms of different antibiotic treatments for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in people with decompensated liver cirrhosis.We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and trials registers until November 2018 to identify randomised clinical trials on people with cirrhosis and SBP.We included only randomised clinical trials (irrespective of language

2019 Cochrane

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