How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

41 results for

Yergason Test

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Yergason Test

Yergason Test Yergason Test Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Yergason Test Yergason Test Aka: Yergason Test II (...) of bicipital groove Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Yergason Test." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Examination About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6656 interlinked topic pages divided

2018 FP Notebook

2. Yergason Test

Yergason Test Yergason Test Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Yergason Test Yergason Test Aka: Yergason Test II (...) of bicipital groove Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Yergason Test." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Examination About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6656 interlinked topic pages divided

2015 FP Notebook

3. The backward traction test: a new and effective test for diagnosis of biceps and pulley lesions. (PubMed)

clinical tests (Speed and Yergason tests). Shoulder arthroscopy was used as the "gold standard."For the detection of LHB injury, the BT test was the most sensitive (74%) and accurate (68%). The BT test had a higher diagnostic value for pulley lesions, with a high sensitivity of 81% and an accuracy of 71%. No significant differences in terms of specificity for LHB and pulley lesions were observed between tests. Regarding pulley lesions, the internally rotated and externally rotated BT test positions had (...) The backward traction test: a new and effective test for diagnosis of biceps and pulley lesions. The value of physical examination for diagnosis of lesions of the long head of the biceps (LHB) and the pulley remains unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study was to describe a new diagnostic test, the backward traction (BT) test, to detect lesions of the LHB and the biceps pulley.A prospective study of 143 patients was performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of the BT test and 2 traditional

2019 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

4. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests directed to the long head of biceps tendon in a surgical population: a combination of old and new tests. (PubMed)

Diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests directed to the long head of biceps tendon in a surgical population: a combination of old and new tests. Our objective was to examine the clinical utility of old and new clinical tests directed to the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) and to quantify the importance of proper test interpretation.A consecutive 65 patients scheduled to undergo arthroscopic surgery were selected. Before surgery, 5 clinical tests were performed: Speed, Yergason, upper cut (...) , biceps resisted flexion (BRF), and modified BRF (mBRF) using a dumbbell. Pain in an area other than the bicipital groove was noted. The presence of LHBT disease was assessed at arthroscopy, and the clinical utility of the tests was calculated.The upper cut test was the most sensitive test and the one with the lowest negative likelihood ratio (0.90 and 0.26, respectively); the Yergason test was the most specific and the one with the highest positive likelihood ratio (0.83 and 2.20, respectively). BRF

2019 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

5. The most special test…

, both can positions do not stress ANY part of the rotator cuff more than any of the other surrounding shoulder muscles (see figure below ). Also, the belief that pain on the ‘Speeds’ or ‘Yergasons’ special tests isolates the long head of biceps from the other surrounding shoulder tissues and therefore is more specific for biceps tendon pathology is also not true ( ). And this is not unique to the shoulder special tests, it is also the same for many other special tests in many other areas (...) The most special test… The most special test… | The Sports Physio Simple, practical, honest advice Menu / Special orthopaedic tests are commonly used by clinicians in the assessment of those with musculoskeletal pain or injury. There is a mind-boggling number of these tests, usually named after the clinicians who invented them covering all areas of the body, and they are believed to help diagnose many different injuries and pathologies. However, it’s time to look at these special tests

2017 The Sports Physio blog

6. Special physical examination tests for superior labrum anterior posterior shoulder tears are clinically limited and invalid: a diagnostic systematic review

-posterior lesions and presented original data were eligible for inclusion. Studies that reported descriptions of the examination only, with no aim to report clinical accuracy data, were excluded. Included studies were prospective and retrospective case series and cohort and case-control studies. Tests studied included: anterior slide test; slapprehension; biceps load tests; Crank test; O’Brien test; active compression; compression rotation; Speed’s test; Yergason’s test; Jobe; bicipital groove pain (...) reported specificities less than 75%. One study did not report sensitivity and two did not report specificity. Reported sensitivities (36 data sets) ranged from 4 to 100%. Reported specificities (34 data sets) ranged from 11 to 100%. The one study that met all five validity criteria compared Speed and Yergason’s tests individually with the surgical reference standard and found that in both cases confidence intervals for positive and negative likelihood ratios crossed 1, which indicated that the results

2009 DARE.

7. A meta-analysis examining clinical test utility for assessing superior labral anterior posterior lesions

was a poor test for detection of a labral lesion in the shoulder. Active compression, crank and Speed tests were preferred. CRD commentary The objective of the review was clearly stated and inclusion criteria were defined. The authors stated that tests assessed by a single study would be excluded from the meta-analysis. However, it appeared that studies in this category as well as studies of tests that were assessed by two (pain provocation and posterior jerk), three (Jobe relocation) or four (Yergason’s (...) A meta-analysis examining clinical test utility for assessing superior labral anterior posterior lesions A meta-analysis examining clinical test utility for assessing superior labral anterior posterior lesions A meta-analysis examining clinical test utility for assessing superior labral anterior posterior lesions Meserve BB, Cleland JA, Boucher TR CRD summary This review concluded that the anterior slide test was poor for detection of labral lesions in the shoulder; active compression, crank

2009 DARE.

8. Which physical examination tests provide clinicians with the most value when examining the shoulder? Update of a systematic review with meta-analysis of individual tests. (PubMed)

, regarding superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears, the test with the best sensitivity (52%) was the relocation test; the test with the best specificity (95%) was Yergason's test; and the test with the best positive likelihood ratio (2.81) was the compression-rotation test. Regarding new (to this series of reviews) ShPE tests, where meta-analysis was not possible because of lack of sufficient studies or heterogeneity between studies, there are some individual tests that warrant further (...) Which physical examination tests provide clinicians with the most value when examining the shoulder? Update of a systematic review with meta-analysis of individual tests. To update our previously published systematic review and meta-analysis by subjecting the literature on shoulder physical examination (ShPE) to careful analysis in order to determine each tests clinical utility.This review is an update of previous work, therefore the terms in the Medline and CINAHL search strategies remained

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2012 British Journal of Sports Medicine

9. Adhesive capsulitis

by provocative manoeuvres negative Spurling manoeuvre (to exclude cervical spine radiculopathy) negative Hawkins test (to exclude rotator cuff impingement) negative Neer test (to exclude shoulder impingement) negative Speed test (to exclude superior labrum from anterior to posterior [SLAP] tear) negative O'Brien test (to exclude superior labrum from anterior to posterior [SLAP] lesion) negative Yergason test (to exclude proximal biceps tendon pathology) negative apprehension test (to exclude anterior (...) of motion. Rookmoneea M, Dennis L, Brealey S, et al. The effectiveness of interventions in the management of patients with primary frozen shoulder. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2010;92:1267-1272. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20798446?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam shoulder stiffness decreased shoulder active range of motion decreased shoulder passive range of motion positive coracoid pain test positive shoulder shrug test presence of risk factors shoulder pain alternative diagnosis not suggested

2018 BMJ Best Practice

10. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Joint Surgery

? Pain in the anterior shoulder during resisted supination of the forearm ? Positive Speed or Yergason Test ? MRI confirmation of biceps pathology Copyright © 2019. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. Joint Surgery 16 Selected References 1. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Optimizing the management of rotator cuff problems guideline and evidence report, (2010) Rosemont IL, 325 pgs. 2. American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, The treatment of glenohumeral joint osteoarthritis, (2009 (...) osteophytes, joint subluxation, avascular necrosis or bone on bone articulations. The degree of joint space narrowing should also be noted. Tobacco Cessation – Adherence to a tobacco-cessation program resulting in abstinence from tobacco for at least six (6) weeks prior to surgery is recommended. Documentation of nicotine-free status by laboratory testing (e.g., cotinine level or carboxyhemoglobin) is recommended. After six (6) weeks of tobacco cessation, labs should be performed with ample time afforded

2019 AIM Specialty Health

11. Extremity imaging

Administrative Guidelines 6 Ordering of Multiple Studies 6 Simultaneous Ordering of Multiple Studies 6 Repeated Imaging 6 Pre-Test Requirements 7 History 7 Imaging of the Extremities 8 General Information/Overview 8 Scope 8 Technology Considerations 8 Definitions 8 Clinical Indications 10 Congenital and Developmental Conditions 10 Blount disease (Pediatric only) 10 Congenital anomalies of the lower extremity (Pediatric only) 10 Congenital anomalies of the upper extremity (Pediatric only) 11 Coxa vara (...) on persistent symptoms with no clinical change, treatment, or intervention since the previous study ? Repeated imaging of the same anatomical area by different providers for the same member over a short period of time Imaging of the Extremities Copyright © 2019. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. 7 Pre-Test Requirements Critical to any finding of clinical appropriateness under the guidelines for specific imaging exams is a determination that the following are true with respect to the imaging request

2019 AIM Specialty Health

12. Exam Series: Guide to the Shoulder Exam

supination; a positive Speed’s or Yergason’s test. A “Popeye” muscle indicates a complete bicep tear. Clinical diagnosis. Imaging may show a reduction in the subacromial space. Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tear Repetitive overhead movements, especially in labourers and athletes who throw overhead Range of motion is often accompanied by mechanical symptoms such as clicking or catching. Positive O’Brien’s. Clinical diagnosis. Imaging may be used to rule out other pathology. Management (...) to rotate their arms externally) to 45° or overhead reach to T4, internal rotation to 45° degrees or underarm reach to T8-T4. Deficiencies in certain planes of motion helps to localize injury to a specific rotator cuff muscle. Power : Test power in flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction, comparing both sides. Special Tests : Videos of the special tests from Physiotutors are linked below: Rotator Cuff Tear: and : Pain with abduction past 90° and an inability to smoothly lower the affected arm could

2018 CandiEM

13. Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline

concomitant pathology. Some signs and symptoms include locking, popping, and grinding sensation, and pain worse when doing activities [63] . Physical exam (e.g. O’Brien’s test, Neer’s test, Yergason’s test) may be used to strengthen a diagnosis, but the decision to proceed to operative management should be based on imaging findings. Conventional MRI may be used, but MRI with contrast has the highest reported sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of SLAP tears [12, 64-67] . Since most SLAP tears (...) . If pain was present with the thumb down but relieved with the thumb up, it is considered a positive test, suspicious for a labral tear. ? Yergason’ s test: flex elbow to 90 degrees, shake hands with patient and provide resistance against supination. Pain indicates possible bicipital tendinopathy or a labral tear. ? Speed’s test: flex the shoulder to 90 degrees with the arm supinated. Provide downward resistance against shoulder flexion. Pain indicates possible bicipital tendinopathy or a labral tear

2018 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

14. Imaging Program Guidelines: Pediatric Imaging

Bryn Mawr Avenue South Tower – Suite 800 Chicago, IL 60631 P . 773.864.4600 www.aimspecialtyhealth.comTable of Contents – Pediatrics | Copyright © 2017. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. 2 Table of Contents Description and Application of the Guidelines 4 Administrative Guidelines 5 Ordering of Multiple Studies 5 Pre-test Requirements 6 Head & Neck Imaging 7 CT of the Head – Pediatrics 7 MRI of the Head/Brain – Pediatrics 14 CTA/MRA Head: Cerebrovascular – Pediatrics 21 Functional MRI (fMRI (...) of clinical appropriateness under the guidelines for specific imaging exams is a determination that the following are true with respect to the imaging request: ? A clinical evaluation has been performed prior to the imaging request (which should include a complete history and physical exam and review of results from relevant laboratory studies, prior imaging and supplementary testing) to identify suspected or established diseases or conditions. ? For suspected diseases or conditions: ? Based

2017 AIM Specialty Health

15. Standardized and Modified Corticosteroid Subacromial Injection for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

into the subacromial bursa and biceps tendon sheath with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide plus 3 mL of lidocaine Outcome measurement: Visual analogue scale of pain, physical examination(bicipital groove compression test, Speed's test, Yergason's test, empty can test, Neer's impingement test, Hawkins‐Kennedy impingement test, painful arc test), range of motion, shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI), shoulder sonography (gray-scale/elastography) Statistical analysis: Continuous variables Student's t test: fit (...) assumption of normal distribution Mann‐Whitney test: does not fit the assumption of normal distribution Categorical variables (1) Chi‐square test (2) Fisher exact test: sparse data Multivariate analysis: Linear regression Logistic regression Keywords: ultrasonography, corticosteroid, subacromial impingement syndrome, shoulder pain Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 60 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model

2017 Clinical Trials

16. Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline

concomitant pathology. Some signs and symptoms include locking, popping, and grinding sensation, and pain worse when doing activities [56] . Physical exam (e.g. O’Brien’s test, Neer’s test, Yergason’s test) may be used to strengthen a diagnosis, but the decision to proceed to operative management should be based on imaging findings. Conventional MRI may be used, but MRI with contrast has the highest reported sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of SLAP tears [12, 57-60] . Since most SLAP tears (...) a positive test, suspicious for a labral tear. 20 ? Yergason’ s test: flex elbow to 90 degrees, shake hands with patient and provide resistance against supination. Pain indicates possible bicipital tendinopathy or a labral tear. ? Speed’s test: flex the shoulder to 90 degrees with the arm supinated. Provide downward resistance against shoulder flexion. Pain indicates possible bicipital tendinopathy or a labral tear. ? Biceps load test: supinate the arm, abduct shoulder to 90 degrees, flex elbow to 90

2013 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

17. Spontaneous rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon in a woman with hypothyroidism: a case report (PubMed)

of the long head of the biceps tendon in a 48-year-old white woman with severe hypothyroidism. She described experiencing a sudden sharp pain and an audible pop in her right shoulder while using her personal computer. On physical examination she was positive for Yergason's sign and a subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scan showed complete rupture of the long head of her biceps tendon. Laboratory tests revealed significantly elevated thyrotropin levels (>100 μIU/ml) and very low levels of both (...) triiodothyronine (0.17 ng/ml) and free thyroxine (0.18 ng/dl). She was switched to a different thyroxin regimen with a progressive dosage increment. She declined surgical re-anchorage of the tendon but despite the discreet Popeye sign, her overall strength and shoulder function were satisfactory. After 2 months, she was found to be clinically euthyroid, having normal thyroid function tests (thyrotropin 2.95 μIU/mL, free thyroxine 1.07 ng/dl). At her last follow-up visit, 1 year post-injury, she reported nearly

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Journal of medical case reports

18. The "3-Pack" Examination Is Critical for Comprehensive Evaluation of the Biceps-Labrum Complex and the Bicipital Tunnel: A Prospective Study. (PubMed)

for arthroscopic subdeltoid transfer of the long head of the biceps tendon to the conjoint tendon and 29 asymptomatic comparison subjects. Each patient underwent examination that included the 3-Pack (active compression test [O'Brien sign], throwing test, and bicipital tunnel palpation) and traditional examination (Speed test; Yergason test; full can test; empty can test) in a blinded, randomized fashion by 3 investigators. Intraoperative BLC disease was prospectively categorized by location (inside, junctional (...) , or bicipital tunnel).3-Pack tests were highly sensitive (73% to 98%), but less specific (46% to 79%) for BLC in all 3 locations than some of the traditional tests, which were less sensitive (20% to 67%), but more specific (83% to 100%) for BLC disease in all 3 locations. With regard to hidden bicipital tunnel lesions, palpation and O'Brien sign were highly sensitive (97.8% and 95.7% respectively) and revealed high negative predictive value (NPV, 96.4% and 92.6% respectively). Speed and Yergason tests

2016 Arthroscopy

19. Biceps Tendinopathy (Follow-up)

. Clin J Sport Med . 2016 Nov 23. . Wober W, Rahlfs VW, Buchl N, et al. Comparative efficacy and safety of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs nimesulide and diclofenac in patients with acute subdeltoid bursitis and bicipital tendinitis. Int J Clin Pract . 1998 Apr-May. 52(3):169-75. . Media Gallery Speed test. Yergason test. of 2 Tables Contributor Information and Disclosures Author Peter Gonzalez, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Eastern Virginia

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Bicipital Tendonitis (Follow-up)

. Proximal biceps tendon: injuries and management. Sports Med Arthrosc . 2008 Sep. 16(3):162-9. . Holtby R, Razmjou H. Accuracy of the Speed's and Yergason's tests in detecting biceps pathology and SLAP lesions: comparison with arthroscopic findings. Arthroscopy . 2004 Mar. 20(3):231-6. . Shah RR, Haghpanah S, Elovic EP, Flanagan SR, Behnegar A, Nguyen V, et al. MRI findings in the painful poststroke shoulder. Stroke . 2008 Jun. 39(6):1808-13. . . van Tulder M, Malmivaara A, Koes B. Repetitive strain

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>