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435 results for

Yellow Nail Syndrome

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421. Onychodystrophy and tumor-stage mycosis fungoides confined to a single digit: Report of a case and review of nail findings in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. (Abstract)

infiltrate with increased ratio of CD4:CD8 cells. The patient was treated with radiation resulting in complete resolution. Nail involvement with mycosis fungoides has been scarcely reported, but when present ranges from 20-nail dystrophy to yellow discoloration. The disease often involves most of the nails when present. (...) Onychodystrophy and tumor-stage mycosis fungoides confined to a single digit: Report of a case and review of nail findings in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Mycosis fungoides is often considered one of the great disease imitators presenting with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. We present a case of tumor-stage mycosis fungoides involving a single digit clinically presenting with diffuse swelling of the digit and onychodystrophy. Histologic findings included a reticular dermal lymphocytic

2008 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

422. I have a teenage patient who has pitted nails -no family history or personal history of psoriasis. Are there any other causes of pitted nails?

of pitted nails? We found very little information on the topic. A paper published in 2000 reports [1]: “Pitted nails is a non-specific entity seen in children that is often associated with various underlying skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, alopecia areata and lichen planus; and those without such associations are labelled as idiopathic pitted nails. Spontaneous resolution is common but may take several years.” All the other papers that comment on ‘pitted nails’ refer to conditions (...) be pitted as a result of neurotrophic conditions such as nerve damage. In such instances, the pits often clear with recovery. The Reiter syndrome occasionally leads to pitting, but frequently the nails are surprisingly normal when the cutaneous lesions (keratodermia blennorrhagica) abate.” References 1) Khoo BP et al. A pilot study on the role of intralesional triamcinolone acetonide in the treatment of pitted nails in children. Singapore Med J. 2000 Feb;41(2):66-8. ( ) 2) New York State Department

2006 TRIP Answers

423. Fungal Nail Infections

of the nail, typically of the big toe, thought to be due to previous nail bed trauma). Trauma (tight shoes, nail biting). Poor foot care. irritant or allergic . . Subungual melanoma. . Bacterial paronychia - eg, Pseudomonas spp. infection. Systemic disease - eg, thyroid disease, diabetes, peripheral arterial disease. Rare systemic disorders - eg, keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease), , nail-patella syndrome, pachyonychia congenita. Idiosyncratic (especially tetracyclines, quinolones and psoralens (...) Guidelines. You may find the article more useful, or one of our other . In this article In This Article Fungal Nail Infections In this article Synonyms: onychomycosis (OM), tinea unguium Different fungal organisms may infect the nails, with different patterns of presentation, affecting any part of the nail from the nail bed to the nail matrix and plate. The most common result is a poor cosmetic appearance of the affected nail(s); however, the condition may also cause pain, disfigurement and functional

2008 Mentor

424. Nail Disorders and Abnormalities

of include: Cyanotic congenital heart disease, infective endocarditis. Lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, empyema, lung abscess. Koilonychia Dystrophy of the fingernails in which they are thinned and concave with raised edges (spoon-shaped nails). May be due to iron deficiency or to trauma. Nail-patella syndrome A congenital nail disorder, autosomal dominant inheritance. The patellae and some of the nails are rudimentary or absent. Green nails These may be caused (...) and there is often (although not always) a history of trauma. Leukonychia (white nail) This may be congenital or due to minor trauma, hypoalbuminaemia in chronic liver disease, chronic kidney disease, Beau's lines (as above, which may be white), fungal infection or lymphoma. Yellow nail syndrome is characterised by slow-growing, excessively curved and thickened yellow nails which are associated with peripheral lymphoedema and exudative pleural effusions. Yellow or yellow/white nails without thickening

2008 Mentor

425. Modulation of linear nail growth to treat diseases of the nail. (Abstract)

in the treatment of nail disease. This approach, described recently in the context of the yellow nail syndrome,(1) may be extended to other common disorders such as nail psoriasis, brittle nails, and onychomycosis. (...) Modulation of linear nail growth to treat diseases of the nail. Diseases affecting the nail can cause significant distress and interfere with an individual's self-esteem, personal relationships, and professional life. Often, hand and foot function is adversely affected. Certain diseases are characterized by accelerated nail growth while others show a decrease. In this review, drugs known to influence the growth rate of nails are examined, highlighting their potential use as adjunctive therapy

2004 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

426. Is there any information about nail dystropy occurring after pregnancy? A patient has developed thickened yellow nails after the birth of her baby. Fungal studies were normal and I cannot find pregnan

@tripdatabase.com Is there any information about nail dystropy occurring after pregnancy? A patient has developed thickened yellow nails after the birth of her baby. Fungal studies were normal and I cannot find pregnancy as a cause. Unfortunately, we cannot answer this question. We searched the NLH Specialist Library for Skin Disorders, the TRIP database as well as the medical encyclopaedias, GPNotebook, the Merck Manual and e-Medicine, but found no information on nail dystrophy which may have been caused (...) Is there any information about nail dystropy occurring after pregnancy? A patient has developed thickened yellow nails after the birth of her baby. Fungal studies were normal and I cannot find pregnan Is there any information about nail dystropy occurring after pregnancy? A patient has developed thickened yellow nails after the birth of her baby. Fungal studies were normal and I cannot find pregnancy as a cause. - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL

2007 TRIP Answers

427. Yellow nail syndrome in three siblings: a randomized double-blind trial of topical vitamin E. (Abstract)

Yellow nail syndrome in three siblings: a randomized double-blind trial of topical vitamin E. Yellow nail syndrome is an uncommon disorder characterized by dystrophic nails, lymphedema, and respiratory disease. It has rarely been reported in children and this is the first report of congenital yellow nails in siblings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether topical vitamin E applied to the nail plates and periungual skin would affect the growth rate or appearance of the fingernails (...) , although these were not primary end points of the study. Topical vitamin E did not result in a statistically significant improvement when compared with oil alone for the treatment of the nails in our three patients with yellow nail syndrome. However, it is interesting and perhaps clinically useful that both vitamin E and placebo oil improved the condition of the nails.

2006 Pediatric dermatology Controlled trial quality: predicted high

428. Yellow Nail Syndrome: Analysis of 41 Consecutive Patients. (Abstract)

Yellow Nail Syndrome: Analysis of 41 Consecutive Patients. Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare condition defined by the presence of yellow nails associated with lymphedema and/or chronic respiratory manifestations. Several aspects of this disorder remain poorly defined.We sought to clarify the clinical features and course associated with YNS by analyzing 41 consecutive cases evaluated at a tertiary referral medical center.There were 20 men and 21 women; median age at diagnosis was 61 years (...) and decortication; two additional patients underwent pleurodesis via tube thoracostomy. The yellow nails improved or resolved in 14 of 25 patients (56%) for whom relevant data were available. Median survival of this cohort using the Kaplan-Meier method was 132 months, significantly lower than (p = 0.01) the control population. Among those still alive (20 patients), the disease appeared stable.In most cases, YNS is an acquired disorder and associated respiratory manifestations are generally manageable

2008 Chest

429. Implantation of a pleurovenous shunt for massive chylothorax in a patient with yellow nail syndrome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Implantation of a pleurovenous shunt for massive chylothorax in a patient with yellow nail syndrome. Yellow nail syndrome is a type of lymphatic dysplasia syndrome characterised by the triad of yellow nails, lymphoedema, and pleural effusions. The case history is presented of a 70 year old patient with yellow nail syndrome who complained of dyspnoea caused by massive chylothorax. The patient underwent insertion of a pleuroperitoneal shunt which resulted in abdominal distension and deterioration (...) of leg oedema. The pleuroperitoneal shunt was replaced by a pleurovenous shunt on the right side which led to an improvement in the bilateral pleural effusions, abdominal distension, and leg oedema. A pleurovenous shunt may be an alternative rescue therapy for yellow nail syndrome.

2005 Thorax

430. Yellow nail syndrome: not a genetic disorder? Eleven new cases and a review of the literature. (Abstract)

Yellow nail syndrome: not a genetic disorder? Eleven new cases and a review of the literature. Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is characterized by the triad of characteristic nail changes, chronic respiratory disorders and primary lymphoedema. Over 100 cases have been published, most of which have been sporadic. Despite this, YNS is classified as a dominantly inherited lymphoedema with variable expression. There have been only a few published reports where a positive family history (FH) has been (...) of patients in our study, the late onset of the disease and recovery of nail changes in our patients suggest that YNS may not be primarily a genetic disease as it is currently classified.

2007 British Journal of Dermatology

431. Yellow Nail Syndrome

issue with this page, please visit our . Thank you, we just sent a survey email to confirm your preferences. Further reading and references ; Nail disorders and systemic disease: what the nails tell us. J Fam Pract. 2008 Aug57(8):509-14. ; Yellow nail syndrome. Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2009 Jul15(4):371-5. doi: 10.1097/MCP.0b013e32832ad45a. ; Yellow nail syndrome: analysis of 41 consecutive patients. Chest. 2008 Aug134(2):375-81. doi: 10.1378/chest.08-0137. Epub 2008 Apr 10. ; DermNet NZ ; Yellow nail (...) Guidelines. You may find the article more useful, or one of our other . In this article In This Article Yellow Nail Syndrome In this article Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare disorder, in which there is a triad of: Nail discolouration and nail dystrophy. Lymphoedema. Chronic respiratory disorders It was first described by Samman in 1964. Epidemiology It is very rare with only around 150 published cases. [ ] Men and women are equally affected. [ , ] Aetiology [ , ] Both familial and sporadic cases have

2008 Mentor

432. Dietary treatment of chylous ascites in yellow nail syndrome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Dietary treatment of chylous ascites in yellow nail syndrome. Chylous ascites has rarely been reported in yellow nail syndrome. A case of chylous ascites in yellow nail syndrome is described which was treated successfully with dietary restriction of fat and supplements of medium chained triglycerides.

1989 Gut

433. Chylous ascites, intestinal lymphangiectasia and the 'yellow-nail' syndrome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

in most individuals revealed hypoplasia, or aplasia of the lymphatics, similar to that occurring in primary lymphoedema: other patients also developed pleural effusions of high protein content or ascites suggestive of a more generalised disorder of the lymphatic system. Here we describe a patient in whom the classical 'yellow-nail' syndrome was associated with intestinal and chylous ascites. (...) Chylous ascites, intestinal lymphangiectasia and the 'yellow-nail' syndrome. In 1964 Samman and White described 13 patients with lymphoedema of the lower extremities associated with an unusual dystrophy of the finger and toe nails: this they termed the 'yellow-nail' syndrome. Affected nails were thickened, excessively curved along both axes, very slow growing and of yellowish-grey hue; cuticle and lunula were usually absent and onycholysis was frequently evident. Lower limb lymphangiography

1985 Gut

434. Conjunctival changes associated with yellow nail syndrome Full Text available with Trip Pro

Conjunctival changes associated with yellow nail syndrome 12140219 2002 09 26 2018 11 13 0007-1161 86 8 2002 Aug The British journal of ophthalmology Br J Ophthalmol Conjunctival changes associated with yellow nail syndrome. 930 Bourcier T T Baudrimont M M Borderie V V Mayaud C C Laroche L L eng Case Reports Letter England Br J Ophthalmol 0421041 0007-1161 IM Bronchiectasis complications Conjunctival Diseases complications Humans Male Maxillary Sinusitis complications Middle Aged Nail Diseases (...) complications Syndrome 2002 7 26 10 0 2002 9 27 6 0 2002 7 26 10 0 ppublish 12140219 PMC1771239 J Am Acad Dermatol. 1990 Apr;22(4):608-11 2319021 Br J Dermatol. 1964 Apr;76:153-7 14140738 Postgrad Med J. 1997 Aug;73(862):466-8 9307736 Br J Dermatol. 1996 Feb;134(2):307-12 8746347

2002 The British journal of ophthalmology

435. Coexistent yellow nail syndrome and selective antibody deficiency. (Abstract)

Coexistent yellow nail syndrome and selective antibody deficiency. Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare, often underdiagnosed condition of unknown origin. The clinical features of the syndrome include yellow nails, chronic sinusitis, bronchiectasis, pleural effusion, and lymphoedema. Despite the frequent occurrence of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in patients with YNS, comprehensive analysis of their humoral immunity has not been previously reported.To present the case (...) of a patient with YNS whose recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections may have been caused by an underlying selective antibody deficiency that manifests as impaired IgG antibody response to polysaccharide antigens.The patient underwent cultures of purulent sputum for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, bronchial washings for H. influenzae, and nail scrapings for fungi. Her serum levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, IgG subclasses, and serum titers of IgG antitetanus toxoid, anti-H

2003 Asthma & Immunology

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