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Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months

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1. Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months

4 Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Aka: Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months , Yale Observation Scale for Febrile Children , Yale Observation Scale , Yale Scale for Child with Fever , Febrile Child Evaluation with Yale Scale II. Indications Assessment of febrile child ages 3-36 months Predicts serious infection ( ) Quantifies "Toxic Appearance" in children III. Interpretation Score = 10 serious illness: 2.7% Score = 11-15 serious (...) Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration

2018 FP Notebook

2. Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months

4 Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Aka: Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months , Yale Observation Scale for Febrile Children , Yale Observation Scale , Yale Scale for Child with Fever , Febrile Child Evaluation with Yale Scale II. Indications Assessment of febrile child ages 3-36 months Predicts serious infection ( ) Quantifies "Toxic Appearance" in children III. Interpretation Score = 10 serious illness: 2.7% Score = 11-15 serious (...) Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration

2015 FP Notebook

3. The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

susceptibility to ARF. 3 ARF is a condition seen predominantly in children aged 5–14 years, although recurrent episodes may continue well into the fourth decade of life. Because RHD represents the cumulative heart damage of previous ARF episodes, the prevalence of RHD peaks in the third and fourth decades of life. 3 Therefore, although ARF is a disease with roots in childhood, its effects are felt throughout adulthood, especially in the young adult years when people might otherwise be at their most (...) rheumatic fever 13 Diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever 13 Secondary prevention and rheumatic heart disease control 14 Diagnosis and management of rheumatic heart disease 16 2. Primordial and primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease 19 Introduction 19 Primordial prevention 20 Primary prevention 21 The role of non- group A streptococcus 28 Recommendations regarding the primordial and primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease 28 3

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

4. Interventions Targeting Sensory Challenges in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder - An Update

years) with autistic disorder: results from a 52-week, open-label study. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2011 Jun;21(3):229-36. doi: 10.1089/cap.2009.0121. PMID: 21663425. 739. Marcus RN, Owen R, Manos G, et al. Safety and tolerability of aripiprazole for irritability in pediatric patients with autistic disorder: a 52-week, open-label, multicenter study. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;72(9):1270-6. doi: 10.4088/JCP.09m05933. PMID: 21813076. 740. Margoob MA, Mushtaq D. Serotonin transporter gene (...) and the modulation of joint inflammation. J Parasitol Res. 2011;2011:942616. doi: 10.1155/2011/942616. PMID: 21584243.X- 1 748. Matson JL, Wilkins J, Fodstad JC. The Validity of the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits: Part 1 (BISCUIT: Part 1). Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders. 2011;41(9):1139- 46 8p. doi: 10.1007/s10803-010-0973-3. PMID: 104673819. Language: English. Entry Date: 20110831. Revision Date: 20150711. Publication Type: Journal Article.X-1 749. Mavropoulou S

2017 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

5. Guideline for the Evaluation of Cholestatic Jaundice in Infants: Joint Recommendations of NASPGHAN and ESPGHAN

American Society Received April 20, 2016; accepted July 6, 2016. From the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, the y Division Paediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Paediatric Kidney, Liver and Metabolic Diseases, Hannover Medical School, Hann- over, Germany, the z Yale New Haven Hospital Transplantation Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, the § Department of Pediatrics (...) Hadzic, Cara L. Mack, # Vale ´rie A. McLin, Jean P. Molleston, yy Ezequiel Neimark, zz Vicky L. Ng, and §§ Saul J. Karpen ABSTRACT Cholestatic jaundice in infancy affects approximately 1 in every 2500 term infants and is infrequently recognized by primary providers in the setting of physiologic jaundice. Cholestatic jaundice is always pathologic and indicates hepatobiliary dysfunction. Early detection by the primary care physician and timely referrals to the pediatric gastroenterologist

2017 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

6. First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Children and Young Adults: Systematic Review Update

, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Glen Oaks, NY Jana Davidson, M.D., FRCPC Psychiatrist-in-Chief, B.C. Children’s Hospital, PHSA Clinical Professor, Psychiatry Head, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada Gregory Gale, M.D. Medical Director, Behavioral Health LifeSynch-HUMANA Irving, TX Michael Naylor, M.D. Director, Behavioral Health and Welfare Program Director, Comprehensive Assessment and Response Training System vi Director, Clinical (...) or content expertise, individuals with potential conflicts may be retained. The TOO and the EPC work to balance, manage, or mitigate any potential conflicts of interest identified. The list of Technical Experts who provided input to this report follows: Oscar G. Bukstein, M.D., M.P.H.* Vice-Chair, Department of Psychiatry Boston Children’s Hospital Boston, MA Jana Davidson, M.D., FRCPC* Psychiatrist-in-Chief, B.C. Children’s Hospital, PHSA Clinical Professor, Psychiatry Head, Division of Child

2017 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

7. Pediatrics, Fever (Treatment)

and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger, UNITED STATES, 2017. Available at . January, 2017; Stoll ML, Rubin LG. Incidence of occult bacteremia among highly febrile young children in the era of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a study from a Children's Hospital Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 2004 Jul. 158(7):671-5. . Graneto JW, Soglin DF. Maternal screening of childhood fever by palpation. Pediatr Emerg Care . 1996 Jun. 12(3):183-4. . Bonadio WA, Hegenbarth M (...) illnesses in febrile children less than or equal to 24 months. J Pediatr . 1987 Jan. 110(1):26-30. . Richardson M, Lakhanpaul M. Assessment and initial management of feverish illness in children younger than 5 years: summary of NICE guidance. BMJ . 2007 Jun 2. 334(7604):1163-4. . . Knight C, Glennie L. Early recognition of meningitis and septicaemia. J Fam Health Care . 2010. 20(1):6-8. . Baker MD, Avner JR, Bell LM. Failure of infant observation scales in detecting serious illness in febrile, 4- to 8

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

8. Pediatrics, Fever (Diagnosis)

and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger, UNITED STATES, 2017. Available at . January, 2017; Stoll ML, Rubin LG. Incidence of occult bacteremia among highly febrile young children in the era of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a study from a Children's Hospital Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 2004 Jul. 158(7):671-5. . Graneto JW, Soglin DF. Maternal screening of childhood fever by palpation. Pediatr Emerg Care . 1996 Jun. 12(3):183-4. . Bonadio WA, Hegenbarth M (...) illnesses in febrile children less than or equal to 24 months. J Pediatr . 1987 Jan. 110(1):26-30. . Richardson M, Lakhanpaul M. Assessment and initial management of feverish illness in children younger than 5 years: summary of NICE guidance. BMJ . 2007 Jun 2. 334(7604):1163-4. . . Knight C, Glennie L. Early recognition of meningitis and septicaemia. J Fam Health Care . 2010. 20(1):6-8. . Baker MD, Avner JR, Bell LM. Failure of infant observation scales in detecting serious illness in febrile, 4- to 8

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

9. Pediatrics, Fever (Follow-up)

and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger, UNITED STATES, 2017. Available at . January, 2017; Stoll ML, Rubin LG. Incidence of occult bacteremia among highly febrile young children in the era of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a study from a Children's Hospital Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 2004 Jul. 158(7):671-5. . Graneto JW, Soglin DF. Maternal screening of childhood fever by palpation. Pediatr Emerg Care . 1996 Jun. 12(3):183-4. . Bonadio WA, Hegenbarth M (...) illnesses in febrile children less than or equal to 24 months. J Pediatr . 1987 Jan. 110(1):26-30. . Richardson M, Lakhanpaul M. Assessment and initial management of feverish illness in children younger than 5 years: summary of NICE guidance. BMJ . 2007 Jun 2. 334(7604):1163-4. . . Knight C, Glennie L. Early recognition of meningitis and septicaemia. J Fam Health Care . 2010. 20(1):6-8. . Baker MD, Avner JR, Bell LM. Failure of infant observation scales in detecting serious illness in febrile, 4- to 8

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

10. Pediatrics, Fever (Overview)

and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger, UNITED STATES, 2017. Available at . January, 2017; Stoll ML, Rubin LG. Incidence of occult bacteremia among highly febrile young children in the era of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a study from a Children's Hospital Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 2004 Jul. 158(7):671-5. . Graneto JW, Soglin DF. Maternal screening of childhood fever by palpation. Pediatr Emerg Care . 1996 Jun. 12(3):183-4. . Bonadio WA, Hegenbarth M (...) illnesses in febrile children less than or equal to 24 months. J Pediatr . 1987 Jan. 110(1):26-30. . Richardson M, Lakhanpaul M. Assessment and initial management of feverish illness in children younger than 5 years: summary of NICE guidance. BMJ . 2007 Jun 2. 334(7604):1163-4. . . Knight C, Glennie L. Early recognition of meningitis and septicaemia. J Fam Health Care . 2010. 20(1):6-8. . Baker MD, Avner JR, Bell LM. Failure of infant observation scales in detecting serious illness in febrile, 4- to 8

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

11. Urinary Tract Infection in Children - Diagnosis

children with fever. Journal of Pediatrics. 1994; 124: 513-9. 36. Heldrich FJ, Barone MA, and Spiegler E. UTI: diagnosis and evaluation in symptomatic pediatric patients. Clinical Pediatrics. 2000; 39: 461-72. 37. Heldrich FJ, Barone MA, and Spiegler E. UTI: diagnosis and evaluation in symptomatic pediatric patients. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2000; 39: 461-72. 38. Cheng Y-W and Wong S-N. Diagnosing symptomatic urinary tract infections in infants by catheter urine culture. Journal of Paediatrics & Child (...) SUGGESTIONS FOR CLINICAL CARE a. UTI is more likely in girls and uncircumcised boys (especially between 3-6 months), infants 2 days and there is an absence of another source of fever on examination. No factor can predict with 100% accuracy the absence of serious bacterial illness in febrile infants 0.5 ng/mL predicts reasonably well the presence of renal parenchymal injury, as evidenced by early DMSA scintigraphy (within two weeks of diagnosis) (ungraded). IMPLEMENTATION AND AUDIT Units should consider

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

12. Management of Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in Children and Adolescents

with the greatest impact on clinical care. Management of Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in Children and Adolescents Kenneth C. Copeland , Janet Silverstein , Kelly R. Moore , Greg E. Prazar , Terry Raymer , Richard N. Shiffman , Shelley C. Springer , Vidhu V. Thaker , Meaghan Anderson , Stephen J. Spann , Susan K. Flinn This article has a correction. Please see: Abstract Over the past 3 decades, the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically in North America, ushering (...) in a variety of health problems, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which previously was not typically seen until much later in life. The rapid emergence of childhood T2DM poses challenges to many physicians who find themselves generally ill-equipped to treat adult diseases encountered in children. This clinical practice guideline was developed to provide evidence-based recommendations on managing 10- to 18-year-old patients in whom T2DM has been diagnosed. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP

2013 American Academy of Pediatrics

13. Tympanostomy Tubes in Children Full Text available with Trip Pro

is a moderately-severe loss, and 71 dB or higher is a severe or profound loss (purple). A child with average hearing loss from middle ear effusion in both ears (28 dB) would barely hear soft speech, with some children barely aware of normal speech or a baby crying. Reproduced with permission. When considering the impact of OME on a child’s hearing, clinicians should appreciate that HLs, as measured in decibels, are a logarithmic scale of intensity: for every 3-dB increase, there is a doubling in sound (...) insertion in children with a single episode of otitis media with effusion (OME) of less than 3 months’ duration; (2) clinicians should obtain an age-appropriate hearing test if OME persists for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) or prior to surgery when a child becomes a candidate for tympanostomy tube insertion; (3) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and documented hearing difficulties; (4) clinicians should

2013 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

14. Infective Endocarditis in Childhood: 2015 Update Full Text available with Trip Pro

particular phase of the fever cycle. For children, it is ordinarily not practical to obtain the large volumes recommended for adults with suspected endocarditis. Lesser amounts (eg, 1–3 mL in infants and young children and 5–7 mL in older children) are optimal, depending on the blood culture detection system. Because IE is only rarely caused by anaerobic bacteria, emphasis is usually given to inoculating blood into bottles for aerobic incubation. It is reasonable to obtain 3 blood cultures by separate (...) , with specific attention to the disease as it affects infants and children. In particular, the impact of increased survival for children with congenital heart disease (CHD) on the epidemiology of IE is updated, and newer tools useful for diagnosis and treatment in the pediatric population are reviewed. This review emphasizes changing management perspectives and discussion of new agents that have utility for treatment of resistant organisms. In addition, proper use of the diagnostic microbiology laboratory

2015 American Heart Association

15. Fever Without a Focus (Follow-up)

. . Wasserman GM, White CB. Evaluation of the necessity for hospitalization of the febrile infant less than three months of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J . 1990 Mar. 9(3):163-9. . Wilkinson M, Bulloch B, Smith M. Prevalence of occult bacteremia in children aged 3 to 36 months presenting to the emergency department with fever in the postpneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Acad Emerg Med . 2009 Mar. 16(3):220-5. . Media Gallery of 0 Tables Table. Summary of the Yale Observation Scale Observation Items 1 (Normal (...) in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

16. Fever Without a Focus (Treatment)

Jan. 40(1):21-5. . Vega R. Rapid viral testing in the evaluation of the febrile infant and child. Curr Opin Pediatr . 2005 Jun. 17(3):363-7. . Wasserman GM, White CB. Evaluation of the necessity for hospitalization of the febrile infant less than three months of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J . 1990 Mar. 9(3):163-9. . Wilkinson M, Bulloch B, Smith M. Prevalence of occult bacteremia in children aged 3 to 36 months presenting to the emergency department with fever in the postpneumococcal conjugate (...) on the management of children aged 1 to 36 months presenting with fever without source: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Emerg Med . 2010 Jul. 28(6):647-53. . Massin MM, Montesanti J, Lepage P. Management of fever without source in young children presenting to an emergency room. Acta Paediatr . 2006 Nov. 95(11):1446-50. . McCarthy PL, Lembo RM, Baron MA. Predictive value of abnormal physical examination findings in ill-appearing and well-appearing febrile children. Pediatrics . 1985 Aug. 76(2):167-71

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

17. Fever Without a Focus (Overview)

. . Wasserman GM, White CB. Evaluation of the necessity for hospitalization of the febrile infant less than three months of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J . 1990 Mar. 9(3):163-9. . Wilkinson M, Bulloch B, Smith M. Prevalence of occult bacteremia in children aged 3 to 36 months presenting to the emergency department with fever in the postpneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Acad Emerg Med . 2009 Mar. 16(3):220-5. . Media Gallery of 0 Tables Table. Summary of the Yale Observation Scale Observation Items 1 (Normal (...) in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

18. Fever Without a Focus (Diagnosis)

. . Wasserman GM, White CB. Evaluation of the necessity for hospitalization of the febrile infant less than three months of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J . 1990 Mar. 9(3):163-9. . Wilkinson M, Bulloch B, Smith M. Prevalence of occult bacteremia in children aged 3 to 36 months presenting to the emergency department with fever in the postpneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Acad Emerg Med . 2009 Mar. 16(3):220-5. . Media Gallery of 0 Tables Table. Summary of the Yale Observation Scale Observation Items 1 (Normal (...) in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

19. Reliability of Telemedicine in the Assessment of Seriously Ill Children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

predictive and reliable in detecting underlying illness. The purpose of this study was to determine the interobserver reliability of telemedicine observations, compared with bedside observations, in assessing febrile children and children in respiratory distress.Children 2 to 36 months old presenting with a fever were evaluated by using the Yale Observation Scale; patients aged 2 months to 18 years presenting with respiratory symptoms were evaluated by using the Respiratory Observation Checklist, a list (...) Reliability of Telemedicine in the Assessment of Seriously Ill Children. Data are limited that establish the clinical reliability of telemedicine in evaluating children who are seriously ill. Evaluation of a seriously ill child poses a challenge in that telemedicine is primarily visual, without the ability to perform a "hands-on" physical examination. Previous studies evaluating observation in assessing febrile children and children in respiratory distress have validated observation as both

2016 Pediatrics

20. Pediatrics, Bacteremia and Sepsis (Treatment)

, tachypnea) in infants. An increased respiratory rate is the earliest indicator of respiratory distress and should be considered in the overall decision to obtain a chest radiograph. In febrile children aged 3-24 months, pneumonia may be present even in the absence of definite auscultatory signs. An abnormal respiratory rate or pulse oximetry should alert the emergency physician to the need for a chest radiograph. Chest radiography is indicated if the child shows signs of respiratory distress (...) for managing febrile children in the ED between emergency and pediatric physicians: impact on patient outcome. Am J Emerg Med . 2007 Nov. 25(9):1004-8. . Goldman RD, Scolnik D, Chauvin-Kimoff L, Farion KJ, Ali S, Lynch T, et al. Practice variations in the treatment of febrile infants among pediatric emergency physicians. Pediatrics . 2009 Aug. 124(2):439-45. . Walsh A, Edwards H. Management of childhood fever by parents: literature review. J Adv Nurs . 2006 Apr. 54(2):217-27. . Rupe A, Ahlers-Schmidt CR

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

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