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Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months

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1. Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months

Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration (...) 4 Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Aka: Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months , Yale Observation Scale for Febrile Children , Yale Observation Scale , Yale Scale for Child with Fever , Febrile Child Evaluation with Yale Scale II. Indications Assessment of febrile child ages 3-36 months Predicts serious infection ( ) Quantifies "Toxic Appearance" in children III. Interpretation Score = 10 serious illness: 2.7% Score = 11-15 serious

2018 FP Notebook

2. Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months

Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration (...) 4 Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months Aka: Yale Scale for Febrile Child 3 to 36 months , Yale Observation Scale for Febrile Children , Yale Observation Scale , Yale Scale for Child with Fever , Febrile Child Evaluation with Yale Scale II. Indications Assessment of febrile child ages 3-36 months Predicts serious infection ( ) Quantifies "Toxic Appearance" in children III. Interpretation Score = 10 serious illness: 2.7% Score = 11-15 serious

2015 FP Notebook

3. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

of a long-term care ward with ASB, without fever or UTI symp- toms, were randomized to treatment with norfloxacin 400 mg twice daily or placebo for 7 days (29 patients in each group) and evaluated on a behavioral rating scale before treatment, at end of treatment, and 1 and 3 months posttreatment [98]. The mean scores were higher (worse) in the treatment group, but not statistically different at any time, and worsened in both groups (18.1 to 19.1 with norfloxacin and 15.7 to 16.6 with pla- cebo (...) epi- sode, there were no differences in graft function at 2 years for those with and those without febrile infection [124]. A retrospective review of 189 renal transplant recipients followed for 36 months in whom bacteriuria was consistently Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/cid/ciy1121/5407612 by IDSA user on 21 March 2019IDSA 2019 Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria • cid 2019:XX (XX XXXX) • 15 treated

2019 Infectious Diseases Society of America

4. Urinary Tract Infection in Children - Diagnosis

SUGGESTIONS FOR CLINICAL CARE a. UTI is more likely in girls and uncircumcised boys (especially between 3-6 months), infants 2 days and there is an absence of another source of fever on examination. No factor can predict with 100% accuracy the absence of serious bacterial illness in febrile infants 0.5 ng/mL predicts reasonably well the presence of renal parenchymal injury, as evidenced by early DMSA scintigraphy (within two weeks of diagnosis) (ungraded). IMPLEMENTATION AND AUDIT Units should consider (...) – Catheter Specimen urine (CSU) and Clean Voided Urine (CVU) Pryles et al (1959) [25] 42 Prospective comparative study. Single centre (US). Children aged from 3 months to 10 years admitted for elective surgery with no clinical evidence of UTI. Samples collected after surgery while still under anaesthetic. SPA compared to CSU obtained from the same child compared to 2 months The success rate for SPA was 25% with 168 patients being subjected to SPA in order to obtain the 42 SPA samples. All children

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

5. Guidelines for the treatment of malaria. Third edition

the blood-stage infection has been eliminated but hypnozoites persist in the liver and mature to form hepatic schizonts. After an interval of weeks or months, the hepatic schizonts burst and liberate merozoites into the bloodstream. 4 Guidelines for the treatment of malaria 3 RD EDITIONRing stage. Young, usually ring-shaped, intra-erythrocytic malaria parasites, before malaria pigment is evident by microscopy. Schizont. Mature malaria parasite in host liver cells (hepatic schizont) or red blood cells (...) , the greater is the selection pressure. Severe anaemia. Haemoglobin concentration of 10/year), partial immunity to clinical disease and a reduced risk of developing severe malaria are acquired in early childhood. The pattern of acquired immunity is similar across the sub-Sahel region, where malaria transmission is intense only during the 3- or 4-month rainy season and relatively low at other times. In both these situations, clinical disease is confined mainly to 4 High transmission area: hyperendemic

2015 World Health Organisation Guidelines

6. Management of Dengue Infection in Adults

Management of Dengue Infection in Adults 1 CPG Management of Dengue Infection In Adults (Third Edition) 20152 CPG Management of Dengue Infection In Adults (Third Edition) 2015 3 Published by: Malaysia Health Technology Assessment Section (MaHTAS) Medical Development Division, Ministry of Health Malaysia Level 4, Block E1, Precinct 1 Federal Government Administrative Centre 62590, Putrajaya, Malaysia Copyright The copyright owner of this publication is MaHTAS. Content may be reproduced in any (...) change in management of patient. When it is due for updating, the Chairman of the CPG or National Advisor of the related specialty will be informed about it. A discussion will be done on the need for a revision including the scope of the revised CPG. A multidisciplinary team will be formed and the latest systematic review methodology used by MaHTAS will be employed.2 3 CPG Management of Dengue Infection In Adults (Third Edition) 2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS EPIDEMIOLOGY 1. DENGUE VIRUS AND SEROTYPE TRENDS

2015 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Cardiac Disease

disease. Conclusions— Fetal cardiac medicine has evolved considerably over the past 2 decades, predominantly in response to advances in imaging technology and innovations in therapies. The diagnosis of cardiac disease in the fetus is mostly made with ultrasound; however, new technologies, including 3- and 4-dimensional echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and fetal electrocardiography and magnetocardiography, are available. Medical and interventional treatments for select diseases (...) on the diagnosis of CHD, assessment of cardiac function and cardiovascular system, and treatment options that are available. The American College of Cardiology/AHA classification of recommendations (COR) and level of evidence (LOE) were assigned to each recommendation according to the 2009 methodology manual for American College of Cardiology/AHA Guidelines Writing Committee ( , updated July 3, 2012). LOE classification combines an objective description of the existence and type of studies that support

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2014 American Heart Association

8. Management of Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in Children and Adolescents

initiate insulin therapy for patients a. who have random venous or plasma BG concentrations ≥250 mg/dL; or b. whose HbA1c is >9%. In all other instances, clinicians should initiate a lifestyle modification program, including nutrition and physical activity, and start metformin as first-line therapy for children and adolescents at the time of diagnosis of T2DM. The committee suggests that clinicians monitor HbA1c concentrations every 3 months and intensify treatment if treatment goals for finger-stick (...) of diabetes mellitus were prospectively limited to those that were published in English between January 1990 and June 2008, included abstracts, and addressed children between the ages of 120 and 215 months with an established diagnosis of T2DM. Studies in adults were considered for inclusion if >10% of the study population was 45 years of age or younger. The Medline search limits included the following: clinical trial; meta-analysis; randomized controlled trial; review; child: 6–12 years; and adolescent

2013 American Academy of Pediatrics

9. Reliability of Telemedicine in the Assessment of Seriously Ill Children. (PubMed)

predictive and reliable in detecting underlying illness. The purpose of this study was to determine the interobserver reliability of telemedicine observations, compared with bedside observations, in assessing febrile children and children in respiratory distress.Children 2 to 36 months old presenting with a fever were evaluated by using the Yale Observation Scale; patients aged 2 months to 18 years presenting with respiratory symptoms were evaluated by using the Respiratory Observation Checklist, a list (...) of observational signs of respiratory distress derived from validated studies and developed specifically for the present study by the authors. Telemedicine communication used commercially available tablet devices that provided 2-way, live-streamed images with audio.A total of 132 febrile subjects were evaluated by using the Yale Observation Scale. Strong agreement (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.81) was found between bedside and telemedicine observers. A total of 145 subjects were evaluated by using

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2016 Pediatrics

10. Management of sore throat and indications for tonsillectomy

months, who would then refer again if appropriate, or be reported by the patient at a pre-arranged review hospital appointment. when in doubt as to whether tonsillectomy would be beneficial, a six month period of ; watchful waiting is recommended prior to consideration of tonsillectomy to establish firmly the pattern of symptoms and allow the patient to consider fully the implications of an operation. 1 + 3 3 1 ++ 16 ManageMent of sore throat and indications for tonsillectoMy 7.5 PostoPerative care (...) that the relationship is causal 2 - Case control or cohort studies with a high risk of confounding or bias and a significant risk that the relationship is not causal 3 Non-analytic studies, eg case reports, case series 4 Expert opinion GRADES OF RECOMMENDATION Note: The grade of recommendation relates to the strength of the evidence on which the recommendation is based. It does not reflect the clinical importance of the recommendation. A At least one meta-analysis, systematic review, or RCT rated as 1

2010 SIGN

11. Safety of Probiotics to Reduce Risk and Prevent or Treat Disease

in Studies With Nonspecific Safety Statements 19 Figure 6. Number of Participants in Included Studies 21 Figure 7. Included Strains by Genus 23 Figure 8. Intervention Duration in Months 24 Figure 9. Quality of the Reporting and Risk of Bias in Included Studies 26 Participants (up to 3 Probiotics Intervention Groups, 1 Control Group) 47 Across RCTs 49 Adverse Events Across RCTs 51 Across RCTs 53 Figure 14. RR Number of Participants With Adverse Events Lactobacillus RCTs 60 vii Figure 15. RR Number (...) studies, and interventions are poorly documented. The available evidence in RCTs does not indicate an increased risk; however, rare adverse events are difficult to assess, and despite the substantial number of publications, the current literature is not well equipped to answer questions on the safety of probiotic interventions with confidence. vi Contents Executive Summary ES-1 Introduction 1 Background 1 Project Purpose 3 Scope 4 Analytic Framework 6 Methods 8 Electronic Search for Literature Review

2011 EvidenceUpdates

12. Outcome of Epilepsy Surgery (Overview)

, is the most commonly used scale. All seizure-outcome scales now in use contain subjective components, such as "worthwhile improvement" or "significant reduction." The Engel classification, for example, requires these subjective assessments to distinguish a class 3 outcome from a class 4 outcome, even though each center may have a different definition of worthwhile improvement. [ ] The Engel classification system is as follows: Class 1 - Free of disabling seizures (completely seizure free; nondisabling (...) , whereas in an individual who works and drives, as few as 1-2 seizures a year would be disabling. ILAE classification system In 2001, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) proposed a new classification scheme for outcome with respect to epileptic seizures after surgery. The goal of this classification scheme was to provide a more objective measure of the number of seizures. However, this scale too becomes ambiguous after level 3; determining 50% reduction in seizures can be difficult

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Fever Without a Focus (Diagnosis)

. . Wasserman GM, White CB. Evaluation of the necessity for hospitalization of the febrile infant less than three months of age. Pediatr Infect Dis J . 1990 Mar. 9(3):163-9. . Wilkinson M, Bulloch B, Smith M. Prevalence of occult bacteremia in children aged 3 to 36 months presenting to the emergency department with fever in the postpneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Acad Emerg Med . 2009 Mar. 16(3):220-5. . Media Gallery of 0 Tables Table. Summary of the Yale Observation Scale Observation Items 1 (Normal (...) in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

14. Dermatologic Manifestations of Hematologic Disease (Diagnosis)

or face. Digital clubbing, white fingernails, sicca syndrome, acrocyanosis (20%), plethora (20%), hemangiomas (10%), telangiectasias (10%), and Raynaud phenomenon are also described. [ ] Solitary osteosclerotic lesions can be treated with local radiation in a dose of 40-50 Gy. Systemic and skin changes tend to respond within 1 month and can continue to respond as long as 2-3 years later. Widespread systemic disease requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy. Melphalan and prednisone were given (...) substances (eg, alcohol, dextran, morphine, codeine) can exacerbate symptoms by degranulating the mast cells. Diarrhea, syncope, headache, and wheezing occasionally accompany flushing. Skin lesions include localized lesions (eg, mastocytoma) and generalized cutaneous mastocytosis (eg, urticaria pigmentosa, telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans, diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis). Although mastocytomas may be present at birth, they mostly appear within the first 3 months of life; they are rarely

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Lyme Disease (Diagnosis)

, and to an undifferentiated febrile illness. This stage occurs 1-30 days after the tick bite. Early disseminated Lyme disease usually develops 3-10 weeks after inoculation. Musculoskeletal and neurologic symptoms are the most common; less common are symptoms from cardiac disturbances; and ocular manifestation, most often conjunctivitis. Late or chronic Lyme disease refers to manifestations that occur months to years after the initial infection, sometimes after a period of latency. Signs and symptoms of chronic Lyme (...) of Neurology, and the American College of Rheumatology. Infectious Diseases Society of America. Available at . Accessed: May 17, 2018. Edlow JA. Bull's Eye - Unraveling the Medical Mystery of Lyme Disease . 2nd ed. New Haven: Yale University Press; 2004. Wormser GP, McKenna D, Carlin J, et al. Brief communication: hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme disease. Ann Intern Med . 2005 May 3. 142(9):751-5. . Masters EJ, Grigery CN, Masters RW. STARI, or Masters disease: Lone Star tick-vectored Lyme-like

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Lyme Disease (Diagnosis)

, and to an undifferentiated febrile illness. This stage occurs 1-30 days after the tick bite. Early disseminated Lyme disease usually develops 3-10 weeks after inoculation. Musculoskeletal and neurologic symptoms are the most common; less common are symptoms from cardiac disturbances; and ocular manifestation, most often conjunctivitis. Late or chronic Lyme disease refers to manifestations that occur months to years after the initial infection, sometimes after a period of latency. Signs and symptoms of chronic Lyme (...) of Neurology, and the American College of Rheumatology. Infectious Diseases Society of America. Available at . Accessed: May 17, 2018. Edlow JA. Bull's Eye - Unraveling the Medical Mystery of Lyme Disease . 2nd ed. New Haven: Yale University Press; 2004. Wormser GP, McKenna D, Carlin J, et al. Brief communication: hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme disease. Ann Intern Med . 2005 May 3. 142(9):751-5. . Masters EJ, Grigery CN, Masters RW. STARI, or Masters disease: Lone Star tick-vectored Lyme-like

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Lyme Disease (Diagnosis)

, and to an undifferentiated febrile illness. This stage occurs 1-30 days after the tick bite. Early disseminated Lyme disease usually develops 3-10 weeks after inoculation. Musculoskeletal and neurologic symptoms are the most common; less common are symptoms from cardiac disturbances; and ocular manifestation, most often conjunctivitis. Late or chronic Lyme disease refers to manifestations that occur months to years after the initial infection, sometimes after a period of latency. Signs and symptoms of chronic Lyme (...) of Neurology, and the American College of Rheumatology. Infectious Diseases Society of America. Available at . Accessed: May 17, 2018. Edlow JA. Bull's Eye - Unraveling the Medical Mystery of Lyme Disease . 2nd ed. New Haven: Yale University Press; 2004. Wormser GP, McKenna D, Carlin J, et al. Brief communication: hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme disease. Ann Intern Med . 2005 May 3. 142(9):751-5. . Masters EJ, Grigery CN, Masters RW. STARI, or Masters disease: Lone Star tick-vectored Lyme-like

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Lyme Disease (Diagnosis)

, and to an undifferentiated febrile illness. This stage occurs 1-30 days after the tick bite. Early disseminated Lyme disease usually develops 3-10 weeks after inoculation. Musculoskeletal and neurologic symptoms are the most common; less common are symptoms from cardiac disturbances; and ocular manifestation, most often conjunctivitis. Late or chronic Lyme disease refers to manifestations that occur months to years after the initial infection, sometimes after a period of latency. Signs and symptoms of chronic Lyme (...) of Neurology, and the American College of Rheumatology. Infectious Diseases Society of America. Available at . Accessed: May 17, 2018. Edlow JA. Bull's Eye - Unraveling the Medical Mystery of Lyme Disease . 2nd ed. New Haven: Yale University Press; 2004. Wormser GP, McKenna D, Carlin J, et al. Brief communication: hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme disease. Ann Intern Med . 2005 May 3. 142(9):751-5. . Masters EJ, Grigery CN, Masters RW. STARI, or Masters disease: Lone Star tick-vectored Lyme-like

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Outcome of Epilepsy Surgery (Treatment)

, is the most commonly used scale. All seizure-outcome scales now in use contain subjective components, such as "worthwhile improvement" or "significant reduction." The Engel classification, for example, requires these subjective assessments to distinguish a class 3 outcome from a class 4 outcome, even though each center may have a different definition of worthwhile improvement. [ ] The Engel classification system is as follows: Class 1 - Free of disabling seizures (completely seizure free; nondisabling (...) , whereas in an individual who works and drives, as few as 1-2 seizures a year would be disabling. ILAE classification system In 2001, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) proposed a new classification scheme for outcome with respect to epileptic seizures after surgery. The goal of this classification scheme was to provide a more objective measure of the number of seizures. However, this scale too becomes ambiguous after level 3; determining 50% reduction in seizures can be difficult

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Lyme Disease (Overview)

, and to an undifferentiated febrile illness. This stage occurs 1-30 days after the tick bite. Early disseminated Lyme disease usually develops 3-10 weeks after inoculation. Musculoskeletal and neurologic symptoms are the most common; less common are symptoms from cardiac disturbances; and ocular manifestation, most often conjunctivitis. Late or chronic Lyme disease refers to manifestations that occur months to years after the initial infection, sometimes after a period of latency. Signs and symptoms of chronic Lyme (...) of Neurology, and the American College of Rheumatology. Infectious Diseases Society of America. Available at . Accessed: May 17, 2018. Edlow JA. Bull's Eye - Unraveling the Medical Mystery of Lyme Disease . 2nd ed. New Haven: Yale University Press; 2004. Wormser GP, McKenna D, Carlin J, et al. Brief communication: hematogenous dissemination in early Lyme disease. Ann Intern Med . 2005 May 3. 142(9):751-5. . Masters EJ, Grigery CN, Masters RW. STARI, or Masters disease: Lone Star tick-vectored Lyme-like

2014 eMedicine.com

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