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Work-Related Eye Injury

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61. Sleep disorders - shift work and jet lag

to an imposed shift in the timing of sleep). They cause distress or impairment in social or occupational functioning. SWD occurs when a person who does shift work has difficulty adjusting to different sleep/wake schedules and experiences sleep disturbance before or after the shift, and/or excessive sleepiness and fatigue during shifts. JLD is related to travel across time zones in which there is a misalignment between the timing of the sleep/wake cycles generated by the person's internal circadian rhythm (...) and that required in the new time zone. SWD may increase the risk of chronic sleep distubance; excessive sleepiness and fatigue; cognitive impairment and depression; reduced performance, work-related errors and accidents, and road traffic collisions; cardiometabolic conditions; cancer; and cardiovascular death. JLD may increase the risk of excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue; cognitive impairment; and gastrointestinal and bladder disturbance. Advice on measures to promote sleep include: Creating a cool

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

62. Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review

collection for the study. Three-quarters (103) of the studies were assessed as moderate risk of bias and the others were rated low risk of bias (10) or high risk of bias (25 studies). The concerns about bias were primarily related to three domains: study participation (e.g., concerns about sampling or recruitment), attrition (e.g., lost to followup), and lack of control for confounding factors that were not adequately addressed in the study design. Studies used different indicators for serious injury (...) Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 205 Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review e Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 205 Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I Prepared by: Pacific Northwest Evidence-based

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

63. CRACKCast Episode 142 – Electrical and Lightning Injuries

by lightning) Core questions: [1] What is the relationship between current, voltage and resistance? How does this relate to potential for injury from electrical and lightning injuries? The first part of this question relates to Ohm’s law: Current is the flow of electrons down an electrical gradient. It is measured in units of ampere. According to Ohm’s law, current is directly proportional to the voltage of the source and inversely proportional to the resistance of the material through which it flows. V (...) of ™ due to shock wave / blast effect (expansion effect from air) Hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, Eyes Immediate or delayed onset of cataracts Paralysis of ciliary muscle Other injuries Due to blunt trauma or blast injury ….we’ll re-summarize this in the next question! [6] List clinical findings (early and late) associated with electrical injuries. Early: go head to toe CNS Apnea, LOC, amnesia, peripheral nerve damage/paralysis, keraunoparalysis Cardiovascular Asystole (DC or lightning

2018 CandiEM

64. CRACKCast E143 – Diving Injuries and Dysbarism

CRACKCast E143 – Diving Injuries and Dysbarism CRACKCast E143 - Diving Injuries and Dysbarism - CanadiEM CRACKCast E143 – Diving Injuries and Dysbarism In , by Chris Lipp January 11, 2018 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 143, Diving Injuries and Dysbarism. While infrequently encountered except for those centers frequented by SCUBA enthusiasts, we must know the hard facts on the potentially life-threatening diving related injuries that may occur suddenly and need urgent attention (...) ….and gain increasing popularity. Diving related injury incidence varies from 0.01%-0.02%, and mortality is 1-9 per 100,000 dives. We’ll cover this again in the next chapter, but as a review: Atmospheric pressure = 760 mmHg at sea level. Water = denser than air g. An alpinist needs to ascend 18,000 ft to reduce atm pressure by 50%, but a diver only needs to descend 33 ft in sea water to double atmospheric pressure Key breakdown: Disorders of: Descent Depth Ascent [1] List 5 potential injuries in scuba

2018 CandiEM

65. Use of the litmus paper in the chemical eye injury

Question In [patients presenting to the Emergency Department with chemical eye injury ] is [litmus eye paper] [accurate in measuring the eye PH ]? Clinical Scenario A 25 year old factory worker presents to the ED with a history of painful red right eye following chemical exposure at work , the eye ph was checked with the litmus paper which gave reading of ph 7.8, the eye was irrigated thoroughly then the eye ph checked again - which was 7.2. You want to know accuracy of the litmus paper before (...) Use of the litmus paper in the chemical eye injury BestBets: Use of the litmus paper in the chemical eye injury Use of the litmus paper in the chemical eye injury Report By: Mr. Abdualla zentani - Staff Grade Emergency medicine Search checked by Jane Burslem - Assistant Librarian, Fairfield General Hospital Institution: Fairfield General Hospital , Bury Date Submitted: 26th June 2009 Date Completed: 17th December 2009 Last Modified: 18th December 2009 Status: Green (complete) Three Part

2010 BestBETS

66. Spinal injury: assessment and initial management

optimistic or pessimistic when discussing information on further investigations, diagnosis or prognosis Spinal injury: assessment and initial management (NG41) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 15 of 24ask if there are any other questions. 1.8.2 The trauma team structure should include a clear point of contact for providing information to the patients, their family members and carers. 1.8.3 Make eye contact (...) deliver care to children with major trauma that include the following components: safeguarding taking into account the radiation risk of CT to children when discussing imaging for them the importance of the major trauma team, the roles of team members and the team leader, and working effectively in a major trauma team managing the distress that families and carers may experience and breaking bad news the importance of clinical audit and case review. Spinal injury: assessment and initial management

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

67. Acute kidney injury (AKI): use of medicines in people with or at increased risk of AKI

Acute kidney injury (AKI): use of medicines in people with or at increased risk of AKI Acute kidne Acute kidney injury (AKI): use of medicines in y injury (AKI): use of medicines in people with or at increased risk of AKI people with or at increased risk of AKI Key therapeutic topic Published: 26 February 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/ktt17 pathways K Ke ey points y points Improving the care of people at risk of, or with, acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the Think Kidneys national programmes (...) . Medicines optimisation is important to reduce the risk of AKI and mitigate its severity if it occurs. An NHS Improvement patient safety alert has been issued to further raise awareness of AKI, signposting healthcare professionals to the clinical resources available on the Think Kidneys website. Options for local implementation: Options for local implementation: Review and, if appropriate, optimise prescribing and local policies that relate to assessing the risk of AKI and preventing, identifying

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

68. Antisaccadic Eye Movements Are Correlated with Corpus Callosum White Matter Mean Diffusivity, Stroop Performance, and Symptom Burden in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion (Full text)

Antisaccadic Eye Movements Are Correlated with Corpus Callosum White Matter Mean Diffusivity, Stroop Performance, and Symptom Burden in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion Antisaccades are thought to involve higher level inputs from neural centers involved in rapid eye movement inhibition and control. Previous work has demonstrated that performance on the antisaccade task can help in the assessment of injury in acute and/or chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). In this exploratory (...) study, we performed cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons of rapid eye movement, followed by correlations of antisaccade performance with assessments of symptom burden, diffusion tensor imaging, and a neuropsychological test of response inhibition. Significant deficits in antisaccade median latency, F(2, 31) = 3.65, p = 0.04 and prosaccade error mean duration, F(2, 31) = 3.63, p = 0.04 were found between patient groups and controls: the former was correlated with loss of white matter

2016 Frontiers in neurology

69. Open globe eye injury characteristics and prognostic factors in Jazan, Saudi Arabia (Full text)

Open globe eye injury characteristics and prognostic factors in Jazan, Saudi Arabia To evaluate characteristics and prognostic factors of open globe injuries (OGI) presented to King Fahad Specialist Hospital in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia.  Methods: This study is a retrospective review of medical records of OGI patients who underwent operative repair of their injuries in King Fahad Central Hospital, Jazan, Saudi Arabia between January 2011 and December 2013. Demographic information, eye (...) iris injuries or hyphema. Most cases suffered penetration (37.5%) of the eye globe. Only zone I injury was significantly associated with better visual acuity outcomes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.447, p=0.036). Among the variables that were associated with poorer prognostic outcomes, only aphakia (OR: 0.180), retinal damage (OR: 0.062), vitreous hemorrhage (OR: 0.266), and zone III injuries (OR: 0.092) were statistically significant (p less than 0.05).     Conclusion: Zone I injury appears to have a better

2016 Saudi medical journal

70. Visual outcome after emergency surgery for open globe eye injury in Japan (Full text)

), but not in the females. Twenty-five patients had injury to the right eye (62.5%) and 15 had injury to the left eye (37.5%). A significant improvement in visual acuity was achieved after treatment of injury to the right eye (P=0.021), but not the left eye (P=0.109). The most frequent cause of injury was an accident (15 eyes; 37.5%). The second most frequent cause was work-related injury (14 eyes; 35.0%), which only occurred in males, and the third cause was accident due to negligence (eleven eyes; 27.5%). Two (...) patients developed sympathetic ophthalmia and one patient developed postoperative endophthalmitis.The majority of patients with open globe eye injury were male workers in Japan. The visual outcome of work-related injury was better than that of injury due to other causes. The visual outcome was also better if the right eye was injured compared with the left eye. Patients with injuries due to negligence were older than the other groups, and this finding might be characteristic of an aging society.

2016 Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.)

71. Timing of Pars Plana Vitrectomy in Management of Gunshot Perforating Eye Injury: Observational Study (Full text)

Timing of Pars Plana Vitrectomy in Management of Gunshot Perforating Eye Injury: Observational Study The aim of this study is to report the difference in either anatomical or functional outcome of vitreoretinal intervention in cases of gunshot perforating eye injury if done 2-4 weeks or after the 4th week after the original trauma. Patients were treated with pars plana vitrectomy and silicon oil. Surgeries were performed in the period from February 2011 until the end of December 2014. 253 eyes (...) of 237 patients were reviewed. 46 eyes were excluded. 207 eyes of 197 patients were analyzed. The included eyes were classified based on the timing of vitrectomy in relation to the initial trauma into two groups: 149 eyes (the first group) operated on between the 3rd and the 4th week and 58 eyes (the second group) operated on after the 4th week after the trauma. Following one surgical intervention, in the first group, attached retina was achieved in 93.28% of patients. In the second group, attached

2016 Journal of ophthalmology

72. A Scoping Review of the Associations of Golf with Eye Injuries in Adults and Children (Full text)

using the databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Grey literature was searched using the WHO international clinical trials registry platform, Google Scholar, and ProQuest. Data was extracted using a standardised form and summarised into a report. Results and Discussion. Twenty-three studies were found relating to eye injuries in golf. Injuries appear to be rare, but more frequent in men and children. Injuries resulted in high rates of enucleation and visual impairment. Children (...) A Scoping Review of the Associations of Golf with Eye Injuries in Adults and Children Introduction. Sport presents a risk of ocular trauma and accounts for a significant number of eye injuries that require hospital admission. The sport of golf presents a risk to eyesight from fast moving objects such as golf clubs and balls. This study aims to investigate the associations of golf with eye injuries and the reasons that these injuries occur. Material/Methods. A literature search was conducted

2016 Journal of Sports Medicine

73. Eye and Orbital Injuries in Sports. (PubMed)

Eye and Orbital Injuries in Sports. Sports-related eye and orbital injuries continue to occur regularly and may have serious consequences. They are completely preventable when appropriate protection is worn, particularly with polycarbonate lenses. Eye protection is available for most sports and should be worn in accordance with the standards of regional authorities. It is important for first responders to identify red flags in the history and physical examination of an injured athlete (...) for urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Common sports-related eye injuries include corneal abrasion, subconjunctival hemorrhage, hyphema, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal tears and detachment. The mechanism and treatment of these injuries are discussed in further detail.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2017 Clinics in Sports Medicine

74. Use of Eye Movement Tracking to Detect Oculomotor Abnormality in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

: June 19, 2018 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: Groups and Cohorts Go to Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment Potential Traumatic Brain Injury This group will consist of people admitted to the ER, Trauma Bay, or Neurosurgery for potential traumatic brain injury. Device: EyeBox CNS Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : A change in metrics of eye movement that enable positive concussion detection using BOX Score. [ Time Frame: Immediately after eye (...) Use of Eye Movement Tracking to Detect Oculomotor Abnormality in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients Use of Eye Movement Tracking to Detect Oculomotor Abnormality in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2016 Clinical Trials

75. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guideline Comprehensive Adult Eye and Vision Examination

or nonprescription drugs with ocular side effects; having high or progressive refractive error; wearing contact lenses; previous eye surgery or eye injury; having functional vision in only one eye; and those with other eye-related concerns or conditions. EXAMINATION INTERVAL PATIENT AGE (YEARS) ASYMPTOMATIC/LOW-RISK AT RISK* 18 through 39 At least every two years At least annually or as recommended 40 through 64 At least every two years At least annually or as recommended 65 and older Annually At least annually (...) Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guideline Comprehensive Adult Eye and Vision Examination Comprehensive Adult Eye and Vision Examination Quick Reference Guide: Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline First edition, 20152 1. GOALS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE ADULT EYE AND VISION EXAMINATION • Evaluate the functional status of the eyes and visual system • Assess ocular health and related systemic health conditions • Establish a diagnosis and formulate a treatment and management plan • Counsel

2015 American Optometric Association

76. Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy

no warranty, express or implied, regarding the information. ASCO specifically disclaims any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use or purpose. ASCO assumes no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of this information, or for any errors or omissions. Guideline and Conflicts of Interest The Expert Panel was assembled in accordance with ASCO’s Conflict of Interest Policy Implementation for Clinical Practice Guidelines (...) Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2017.77.6385 Journal of Clinical

2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

77. Preventing Falls and Reducing Injury from Falls, Fourth Edition

to ensure the accuracy of the contents at the time of publication, neither the authors nor the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) gives any guarantee as to the accuracy of the information contained in them or accepts any liability with respect to loss, damage, injury, or expense arising from any such errors or omission in the contents of this work. Copyright With the exception of those portions of this document for which a specific prohibition or limitation against copying appears (...) , ON: Author. Funding This work is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. All work produced by RNAO is editorially independent from its funding source. Contact Information Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario 158 Pearl Street, Toronto, Ontario M5H 1L3 Website: www.RNAO.ca/bpgPreventing Falls and Reducing Injury from Falls Fourth EditionGreetings from Doris Grinspun, Chief Executive Officer, Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario The Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario

2017 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

78. Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking

Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Update of the guidelines issued by the 2011 hearing commission GUIDELINES TEXT July 2017 CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE The good practice guidelines (GPG) are defined in the health field as methodically developed proposals to assist the practitioner and the patient to find the most appropriate care in given clinical circumstances. The GPGs are rigorous summaries (...) of studies, the guidelines are based on agreement between experts in the working group after consultation with the reading group. The absence of grading does not mean that the guidelines are not relevant and useful. However, it should prompt additional studies. Shaken baby syndrome HAS/Guidelines department/SOFMER/July 2017 3 Summary Abbreviations and acronyms 5 Introduction 6 Guidelines 7 1. Shaking: diagnostic approach 7 1.1 Importance of identifying NAHI 7 1.2 Lesions and hospital-clinical

2017 HAS Guidelines

79. CRACKCast E062 – Venomous Animal Injuries

CRACKCast E062 – Venomous Animal Injuries CRACKCast E062 - Venomous Animal Injuries - CanadiEM CRACKCast E062 – Venomous Animal Injuries In , by Chris Lipp February 13, 2017 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 62, Venomous Animal Injuries. This presentation will be highly variable depending on where you practice, and this episode will equip you with tools to approach these cases as they arise. Shownotes – Rosen’s in Perspective Before we dive into Rosens, I just wanted to note (...) rattlesnakes, copperheads & water moccasins, and pygmy rattlesnakes. All these fall into the Crotalidae family. Pit midway between eye and nostril – head-sensitive organ for locating prey. This is 100% consistent in the family. Other useful characteristics are elliptical pupil, tail structure of single rows of sub-caudal plates, triangle head and presence of fants (not 100% sensitive) The size of the snake doesn’t matter when it comes to envenomation “ Ask for a smile on the heat-seeking missile, or don’t

2017 CandiEM

80. Predicting severe brain injuries from apparent minor head trauma without a scan

are broadly in line with 2014 NICE guidance to use multiple criteria to assess likelihood of severe brain injury, although these specific decision rules are not mentioned. Citation and Funding Easter JS, Haukoos JS, Meehan WP, et al. JAMA. 2015;314(24):2672-81. This work was supported in part by grants K12 HS019464-01, Physician Scientist Award (Dr Easter), and K02 HS017526, an Independent Scientist Award (Dr Haukoos), both from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, R01AI106057 from the National (...) , and pedestrians struck by motor vehicles, may help identify patients at increased risk of severe intracranial injuries. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is used to assess the severity of head injuries based on the state of consciousness of a person. It assigns the best eye opening, verbal response, and motor scores up to a total of 3-15 points, where three is least conscious and 15 is totally alert. Clinical decision rules included in this study: New Orleans Criteria Older than 60 years Intoxication Headache Any

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

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