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Weighted Mean Difference

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161. Weight and Shape Concern Impacts Weight Gain Prevention in the SNAP Trial: Implications for Tailoring Intervention Delivery. (PubMed)

), self-regulation with large changes (to facilitate preemptive weight loss of 5-10 lb), or self-guided control. WSC was assessed by using one item from the Eating Disorders Assessment. ANOVA was used to examine whether the association between baseline level of WSC and percent weight change over 24 months differed across treatment conditions.Approximately 22% of participants reported high WSC (37% moderate; 41% low). WSC and treatment condition interacted to influence weight change at 24 months (P (...)  = 0.03). Individuals with high WSC gained weight in the large changes group (WSC least squares means ± SE, high: + 0.73% ± 1.19%; moderate: -2.74% ± 0.84%; low: -2.41% ± 0.79%). The small changes condition was particularly effective for those with high WSC (high WSC: -2.49% ± 1.16%; moderate: -0.60% ± 0.88%; low: -0.71% ± 0.80%). WSC did not impact weight change among control participants.Individuals with high WSC may benefit from a small-changes approach to weight gain prevention. These findings

2018 Obesity Controlled trial quality: uncertain

162. Greater improvements in diet quality among overweight participants following a group-based commercial weight loss programme than those receiving support to lose weight in primary care (PubMed)

and energy density over time between groups, and their relationships with weight loss.The CP group demonstrated greater mean weight loss than the SC group at 6 months (3.3 kg, 95% CI: 2.2, 4.4) and 12 months (3.3 kg, 95% CI: 2.1, 4.5). Diet quality improved in both intervention groups at 6 and 12 months. However, the CP group (n = 228) achieved significantly greater mean reductions in energy intake (mean difference; 95% CI: - 503 kJ/d; - 913, - 93), dietary energy density (- 0.48 MJ/g; - 0.81, - 0.16 (...) ), total fat (- 6.9 g/d; - 11.9, - 1.8), saturated fat (- 3.3 g/d; - 5.4, - 1.1), and significantly greater mean increases in fibre density (0.30 g/MJ; 0.15, 0.44) at 6 months than the SC group (n = 239). Similar differences persisted at 12 months and the CP group showed greater mean increases in protein density (0.65 g/MJ). In both groups, weight loss was associated with increased fibre density (0.68 kg per g/MJ, 95% CI: 0.08, 1.27) and protein density (0.26 kg per g/MJ, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.41).Following

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2018 Nutrition journal Controlled trial quality: uncertain

163. Alignment of diet prescription to genotype does not promote greater weight loss success in women with obesity participating in an exercise and weight loss program. (PubMed)

program. Data were analysed by general linear model repeated measures adjusted for baseline variables and are presented as mean (95% confidence interval) changes from baseline.Participants in the LC group experienced greater improvements (p = 0.051, ηp2 = 0.025) in per cent changes in body composition (weight: MC -3.32 [-1.4, -5.2], LC -5.82 [-4.1, -7.6]; fat mass: MC -7.25 [-3.2, -11.2], LC -10.93 [-7.3, -14.5]; fat-free mass: MC -0.32 [1.4, -2.0], LC -1.48 [0.7, -3.0]; and body fat percentage: MC (...) -4.19 [-1.6, -6.8], LC -5.60 [-3.3, -7.9] %). No significant differences were observed between genotype groups (weight: A -5.00 [-3.3, -6.7], NA -4.14 [-2.2, -6.1]; fat mass: A -10.15 [-7.0, -13.6], NA -8.02 [-4.0, -12.0]; fat-free mass: A -1.23 [0.3, -2.8], NA -0.56 [1.12, -2.3]; and body fat: A -5.28 [-3.0, -7.6], NA -4.51 [-1.9, -7.1] %).Adherence to this exercise and weight-loss program promoted improvements in body composition and health outcomes. While individuals following the LC diet

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2018 Obesity science & practice Controlled trial quality: uncertain

164. Weighted Mean Difference

Weighted Mean Difference Weighted Mean Difference Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Weighted Mean Difference Weighted (...) Mean Difference Aka: Weighted Mean Difference From Related Chapters II. Definition Weighted Mean Difference (WMD) Used in meta-analysis for continuous numerical measurements Each study in a meta-analysis is weighted based on variance III. Interpretation Weighted Mean Difference (WMD) >0 suggests benefit to an intervention (if does not the 0-line) Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Weighted Mean Difference." Click

2015 FP Notebook

165. A Study in Healthy Volunteers Investigating How Quickly and to What Extent BAY1817080 is Taken up, Distributed, Broken Down and Eliminated From the Body, as Well as the Difference Between 2 Different Types of Tablets of BAY1817080 and the Difference Betwe

Down and Eliminated From the Body, as Well as the Difference Between 2 Different Types of Tablets of BAY1817080 and the Difference Between Oral Dose and Dose in the Vein The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (...) A Study in Healthy Volunteers Investigating How Quickly and to What Extent BAY1817080 is Taken up, Distributed, Broken Down and Eliminated From the Body, as Well as the Difference Between 2 Different Types of Tablets of BAY1817080 and the Difference Betwe A Study in Healthy Volunteers Investigating How Quickly and to What Extent BAY1817080 is Taken up, Distributed, Broken Down and Eliminated From the Body, as Well as the Difference Between 2 Different Types of Tablets of BAY1817080

2018 Clinical Trials

166. Maternal sedentary behavior during pre-pregnancy and early pregnancy and mean offspring birth size: a cohort study. (PubMed)

-parametric calibration weighting was used to assign adjustment weight (matching the distribution of sociodemographic and medical characteristics of the full cohort (N = 4128)) to participants with available sedentary behavior data. Weighted linear regression models were used to estimate mean differences in offspring birthweight, head circumference, and ponderal index (birthweight/length3) associated with leisure time sedentary behavior. Regression models were run overall and stratified by offspring sex (...) Maternal sedentary behavior during pre-pregnancy and early pregnancy and mean offspring birth size: a cohort study. Sedentary behavior is associated with adverse health outcomes in the general population. Whether sedentary behavior during pregnancy is associated with newborn outcomes, such as birth size, is not established, and previous studies have been inconsistent. While previous research suggests that male and female fetuses respond differently to maternal behaviors, such as physical

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2018 BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

167. The unintended meaning behind medical schools’ pass-fail system

The unintended meaning behind medical schools’ pass-fail system The unintended meaning behind medical schools’ pass-fail system The unintended meaning behind medical schools’ pass-fail system | | April 6, 2018 11 Shares In recent years, there has been a push across medical schools to change the grading scale towards that of a pass-fail system. The appeals of a pass-fail system to me were obvious. Instead of worrying about my grades as I had in college to maintain an adequate enough GPA to get (...) had ever before in my life, and I barely walked away with a passing score. And yet passing at the beginning of medical school was enough. We were being tested on basic science concepts that did not yet hold much direct clinical application. In anatomy, we were learning Latin on the fly and where different bones and muscles and nerves and blood vessels were in our bodies. While the information was interesting, I still was unable to correlate what we were learning to patient care yet

2018 KevinMD blog

168. The evolving meaning of the body mass index

much difference how much we try to forestall the shift. It is programmed into our bodies, and although exercise might help, Mother Nature simply doesn’t care as much about the gym and the treadmill as she used to. There are practical implications to this process, as pointed out in the JAMA article. Much of our routine health is predicated on maintaining a healthy weight. The most frequent measure of whether we are classified as “healthy,” overweight, or obese depends is which is calculated (...) accurately reflect true “health.” In other words, just because you think you are healthy doesn’t mean you are healthy. And it is possible that if the mavens of weight decide to change the BMI definitions, we could suddenly have a whole lot of folks who thought they were healthy and maintaining that proverbial “healthy body weight” suddenly facing the fact that they are not as healthy as they thought they were. As if we didn’t already have enough things to worry about, now we have to get back on the diet

2018 KevinMD blog

169. DWI - histology: a possible means of determining degree of liver fibrosis? (PubMed)

DWI - histology: a possible means of determining degree of liver fibrosis? The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MRI of the liver at 3T to classify liver fibrosis/cirrhosis.62 patients who underwent both histopathological examination and diffusion-weighted imaging of the liver via 3T MRI within a period of 3 months were included in the study. The Ishak score (1-6) was used to determine the degree of fibrosis: No liver fibrosis (NLF; Ishak 0, n = 16 (...) ), mild liver fibrosis (MLF; Ishak 1-2, n = 23), advanced liver fibrosis (ALF; Ishak 3-5, n = 12), and liver cirrhosis (LC; Ishak 6, n = 11).The corresponding ADC values for the individual patient groups were as follows: NLF: 1123 (SD 95.8); MLF: 1032 (SD 77.6); ALF: 962 (SD 68.8); LC: 1015 (SD 60.2) mm2/s. There is a significant difference between NLF and MLF (p = 0.004) and between MLF and ALF (p = 0.022). A significant difference between patients with ALF and LC (p = 0.117) could not be found.Liver

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2018 Oncotarget

170. Multiple Attribute Group Decision-Making Methods Based on Trapezoidal Fuzzy Two-Dimensional Linguistic Partitioned Bonferroni Mean Aggregation Operators (PubMed)

linguistic information. Then, to improve the accuracy of decision making in some case where there are a sort of interrelationship among the attributes, we analyze partition Bonferroni mean (PBM) operator in trapezoidal fuzzy two-dimensional variable environment and develop two operators: trapezoidal fuzzy two-dimensional linguistic partitioned Bonferroni mean (TF2DLPBM) aggregation operator and trapezoidal fuzzy two-dimensional linguistic weighted partitioned Bonferroni mean (TF2DLWPBM) aggregation (...) Multiple Attribute Group Decision-Making Methods Based on Trapezoidal Fuzzy Two-Dimensional Linguistic Partitioned Bonferroni Mean Aggregation Operators In this paper, we investigate multiple attribute group decision making (MAGDM) problems where decision makers represent their evaluation of alternatives by trapezoidal fuzzy two-dimensional uncertain linguistic variable. To begin with, we introduce the definition, properties, expectation, operational laws of trapezoidal fuzzy two-dimensional

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2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

171. An Approach to Linguistic Multiple Attribute Decision-Making Based on Unbalanced Linguistic Generalized Heronian Mean Aggregation Operator (PubMed)

the unbalanced linguistic generalized arithmetic Heronian mean operator and the unbalanced linguistic generalized geometric Heronian mean operator. For the situation that the input arguments have different degrees of importance, the unbalanced linguistic generalized weighted arithmetic Heronian mean operator and the unbalanced linguistic generalized weighted geometric Heronian mean operator are developed. Then we investigate their properties and some particular cases. Finally, the effectiveness (...) An Approach to Linguistic Multiple Attribute Decision-Making Based on Unbalanced Linguistic Generalized Heronian Mean Aggregation Operator This paper proposes an approach to linguistic multiple attribute decision-making problems with interactive unbalanced linguistic assessment information by unbalanced linguistic generalized Heronian mean aggregation operators. First, some generalized Heronian mean aggregation operators with unbalanced linguistic information are proposed, involving

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2018 Computational intelligence and neuroscience

172. Testing Means to Scale Early Childhood Development Interventions in Rural Kenya

Testing Means to Scale Early Childhood Development Interventions in Rural Kenya Testing Means to Scale Early Childhood Development Interventions in Rural Kenya - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . Testing Means to Scale Early Childhood Development Interventions in Rural Kenya The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03548558 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : June 7, 2018 Last Update Posted

2018 Clinical Trials

173. Prediction of Tibial Rotation Pathologies Using Particle Swarm Optimization and K-Means Algorithms (PubMed)

Prediction of Tibial Rotation Pathologies Using Particle Swarm Optimization and K-Means Algorithms The aim of this article is to investigate pathological subjects from a population through different physical factors. To achieve this, particle swarm optimization (PSO) and K-means (KM) clustering algorithms have been combined (PSO-KM). Datasets provided by the literature were divided into three clusters based on age and weight parameters and each one of right tibial external rotation (RTER

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2018 Journal of clinical medicine

174. Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Means for Prevention of Fractures among Elderly (PubMed)

Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Means for Prevention of Fractures among Elderly Fractures are major cause of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare and social services expenditure in elderly. Fractures often have multifactorial etiologies and the condition emerges due to the interaction between the different predisposing and precipitating factors. One of the most common causes leading to fractures after minimal trauma in older people is osteoporosis. The objective of this article (...) is to describe the clinical concept and summarize the evidence and to explain the future directions for research, focusing on specific issues related to prevent fracture in the elderly. This study reviewed the scientific literature addressing strategies for primary and secondaryprevention of fractures among elderly in the context of pharmacological and non-pharmacological means. A growing body of scientific evidence supports the use of both non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions

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2018 International journal of preventive medicine

175. What do Vitiligo Impact Scale (VIS)-22 scores mean? Studying the clinical interpretation of scores using an anchor-based approach. (PubMed)

methods.This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a large teaching hospital in North India. Patients with vitiligo > 15 years of age (n = 391) completed the VIS-22 and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaires, and answered a Global Question (GQ) on the effect of vitiligo on their lives on a five-point Likert scale. Multiple band sets of VIS-22 scores were devised using GQ as the anchor. A weighted kappa-coefficient was calculated to estimate the level of agreement between different band (...) sets of VIS-22 and GQ. VIS-22 and DLQI were compared based on their degree of correlation and agreement with GQ.The mean ± SD of VIS-22 scores was 24·8 ± 14·0 (range 0-61). VIS-22 scores showed good correlation with GQ (r = 0·76). Of the various VIS-22 band sets tested, the following was chosen: 0-5, 6-15, 16-25, 26-40 and 41-66 (weighted κ = 0·57), corresponding to the five categories of GQ. The degree of correlation (VIS-22, r = 0·77; DLQI, r = 0·69) and agreement (VIS-22, 51·6%; DLQI, 36·1%; P

2018 British Journal of Dermatology

176. Effects of non-medical health coaching on multimorbid patients in primary care: a difference-in-differences analysis. (PubMed)

Surveys between 2013 and 2017. We use a weighted difference-in-differences design to compare changes in outcomes over time between intervention practices and comparable control practices in the rest of England. We conduct our main analysis on multimorbid patients and additional analysis on all patients to assess population-level effects.For multimorbid patients, we find reductions in psychological wellbeing (short and medium term) of -0.0174 (95% confidence interval -0.0283 to -0.0065), relative (...) difference -2% from the pre-intervention mean; and person-centeredness (short term) of -0.0356 (-0.0530 to -0.0183), -4%. We find no significant effects on other outcome measures. For population-level effects, in the short term we find reductions in primary care utilisation of -0.0331 (-0.0448 to -0.0214), -5%. All other outcomes are not consistently statistically significant.Our results show that there is very little effect of health coaching on patient experience and outcomes in the short-to-medium

2019 BMC health services research

177. Effect of breakfast on weight and energy intake: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. (PubMed)

of the effect of breakfast consumption on weight and daily energy intake were performed.Of 13 included trials, seven examined the effect of eating breakfast on weight change, and 10 examined the effect on energy intake. Meta-analysis of the results found a small difference in weight favouring participants who skipped breakfast (mean difference 0.44 kg, 95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.82), but there was some inconsistency across trial results (I2=43%). Participants assigned to breakfast had a higher total (...) daily energy intake than those assigned to skip breakfast (mean difference 259.79 kcal/day, 78.87 to 440.71; 1 kcal=4.18 kJ), despite substantial inconsistency across trial results (I2=80%). All of the included trials were at high or unclear risk of bias in at least one domain and had only short term follow-ups (mean period seven weeks for weight, two weeks for energy intake). As the quality of the included studies was mostly low, the findings should be interpreted with caution.This study suggests

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2019 BMJ

178. Durability of a primary care-led weight-management intervention for remission of type 2 diabetes: 2-year results of the DiRECT open-label, cluster-randomised trial

(2%) control participants had weight loss of at least 15 kg (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 7·49, 95% CI 2·05 to 27·32; p=0·0023) and 53 (36%) intervention participants and five (3%) control participants had remission of diabetes (aOR 25·82, 8·25 to 80·84; p<0·0001). The adjusted mean difference between the control and intervention groups in change in bodyweight was -5·4 kg (95% CI -6·9 to -4·0; p<0·0001) and in HbA1c was -4·8 mmol/mol (-8·3 to -1·4 [-0·44% (-0·76 to -0·13)]; p=0·0063), despite only (...) Durability of a primary care-led weight-management intervention for remission of type 2 diabetes: 2-year results of the DiRECT open-label, cluster-randomised trial The DiRECT trial assessed remission of type 2 diabetes during a primary care-led weight-management programme. At 1 year, 68 (46%) of 149 intervention participants were in remission and 36 (24%) had achieved at least 15 kg weight loss. The aim of this 2-year analysis is to assess the durability of the intervention effect.DiRECT

2019 EvidenceUpdates

179. Weight management telehealth intervention for overweight and obese rural cardiac rehabilitation participants: A randomised trial

-efficacy and use of weight management behaviours.A total of 43 subjects participated, with a mean age of 63 (±9.3) years. The WMI group had significantly more weight loss averaged across the 4 and 6 months of 13.8 (±2.8) pounds compared to the control group [mean = 7.8 (±2.2) pounds]. There were no significant differences in physical activity (activity counts or daily minutes in moderate or more intense activity). The WMI group had significantly higher levels of patient activation. They also had (...) Weight management telehealth intervention for overweight and obese rural cardiac rehabilitation participants: A randomised trial To determine whether a weight management intervention (WMI) plus cardiac rehabilitation (CR) compared to CR alone improves outcomes for overweight and obese cardiac revascularisation patients.Despite participating in cardiac rehabilitation (CR), few cardiac patients lose enough weight to achieve clinically significant cardiovascular disease risk reduction.A randomised

2019 EvidenceUpdates

180. The Effects of Long-term CPAP on Weight Change in Patients With Comorbid OSA and Cardiovascular Disease: Data From the SAVE Trial

or cerebrovascular events and moderate to severe OSA. Participants with weight, BMI, and neck and waist circumferences measured at baseline and during follow-up were included. Linear mixed models were used to examine sex-specific temporal differences, and a sensitivity analysis compared high CPAP adherers (≥ 4 h per night) with propensity-matched control participants.A total of 2,483 adults (1,248 in the CPAP group and 1,235 in the control group) were included (mean 6.1 ± 1.5 measures of weight available). After (...) a mean follow-up of 3.78 years, there was no difference in weight change between the CPAP and control groups, for male subjects (mean [95% CI] between-group difference, 0.07 kg [-0.40 to 0.54]; P = .773) or female subjects (mean [95% CI] between-group difference, -0.14 kg [-0.37 to 0.09]; P = .233). Similarly, there were no significant differences in BMI or other anthropometric measures. Although male participants who used CPAP ≥ 4 h per night gained slightly more weight than matched male control

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2019 EvidenceUpdates

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