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81. Breastfeeding and the Impact on Postpartum Weight: A Focused Practice Question

exposure definitions, outcomes, and inconsistency in results, the authors found insufficient evidence to determine an association between breastfeeding and postpartum weight change. 5 Of the 16 studies, nine reported significant results of an association between breastfeeding (various durations and intensities) and postpartum weight (measured at different times). Continuous outcomes were reported as mean differences (2 studies), correlations (2 studies), and regression coefficients (3 studies (...) point increase (95% CI, 1.0 to 11.3, p,0.05) ? One publication using a subset of women from the above study evaluated change in weight from pre- pregnancy to 6 years postpartum and found benefit only for obese women who were most adherent to breastfeeding guidelines (duration and exclusivity) (n=19, mean change in kg: -8.0, 95% CI -15.4 to -0.7, medium ROB) ? One study stratified results by BMI, parity, and intensity- generally found no differences in weight from a pre-pregnancy measurement

2019 Peel Health Library

82. Early neonatal weight loss and weight gain patterns in infants born by caesarean section: a systematic review

is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However (...) with data from the latest possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference

2019 PROSPERO

83. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials comparing face-to-face vs remote behaviour change interventions for weight management in adults carrying excess weight

will be reported through a descriptive summary. ">Planned approach If a meta-analysis is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size (...) the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference or risk ration as effect measure and containing at least 20 studies, we will produce funnel plots and assess publication bias using Egger’s regression test. ">Publication bias

2019 PROSPERO

84. Behavioural characteristics of successful weight loss maintainers: a systematic review of weight control registries

is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However (...) with data from the latest possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference

2019 PROSPERO

85. A systematic review of the relation between levels of objectively measured polyunsaturated and trans fatty acids during pregnancy and offspring birth weight and later weight development

will be reported through a descriptive summary. ">Planned approach If a meta-analysis is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size (...) the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference or risk ration as effect measure and containing at least 20 studies, we will produce funnel plots and assess publication bias using Egger’s regression test. ">Publication bias

2019 PROSPERO

86. The effects of exercise and dietary weight loss versus dietary weight loss alone on bone health in overweight and obese adults

is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However (...) with data from the latest possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference

2019 PROSPERO

87. Inhaled versus systemic corticosteroids for preventing bronchopulmonary dysplasia in ventilated very low birth weight preterm neonates. (PubMed)

in very low birth weight preterm infants receiving assisted ventilation.Clinical outcomes data were extracted and analysed using Review Manager. When appropriate, meta-analysis was performed using typical relative risk (RR), typical risk difference (RD) and weighted mean difference (WMD). Meta-analyses were performed using typical relative risk, typical risk difference (RD), and weighted mean difference with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). If RD was statistically significant, the number needed (...) Inhaled versus systemic corticosteroids for preventing bronchopulmonary dysplasia in ventilated very low birth weight preterm neonates. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants and inflammation plays a significant role in its pathogenesis. The use of inhaled corticosteroids may modulate the inflammatory process without concomitant high systemic steroid concentrations and less risk of adverse effects. This is an update of a review

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2017 Cochrane

88. Treadmill training and body weight support for walking after stroke. (PubMed)

not increase the chances of walking independently compared with other physiotherapy interventions (risk difference (RD) -0.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.02 to 0.02; 18 trials, 1210 participants; P = 0.94; I² = 0%; low-quality evidence). Overall, the use of treadmill training in walking rehabilitation for people after stroke increased the walking velocity and walking endurance significantly. The pooled mean difference (MD) (random-effects model) for walking velocity was 0.06 m/s (95% CI 0.03 to 0.09 (...) Treadmill training and body weight support for walking after stroke. Treadmill training, with or without body weight support using a harness, is used in rehabilitation and might help to improve walking after stroke. This is an update of the Cochrane review first published in 2003 and updated in 2005 and 2014.To determine if treadmill training and body weight support, individually or in combination, improve walking ability, quality of life, activities of daily living, dependency or death

2017 Cochrane

89. Low molecular weight heparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with lower-limb immobilization. (PubMed)

Low molecular weight heparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with lower-limb immobilization. Immobilization of the lower limb is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are anticoagulants, which might be used in adult patients with lower-limb immobilization to prevent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and its complications. This is an update of the review first published in 2008.To assess the effectiveness of low molecular weight (...) heparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with lower-limb immobilization in an ambulatory setting.For this update, the Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Specialised Register, CENTRAL, and three trials registers (April 2017).Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that described thromboprophylaxis by means of LMWH compared with no prophylaxis or placebo in adult patients with lower-limb immobilization. Immobilization

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2017 Cochrane

90. Early erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

months in the ESA group (weighted mean difference (WMD) 8.22, 95% CI 6.52 to 9.92; I2 = 97% (high heterogeneity); 3 studies, 981 children). The quality of the evidence was low.The total volume of RBCs transfused per infant was reduced by 7 mL/kg. The number of RBC transfusions per infant was minimally reduced, but the number of donors to whom infants who were transfused were exposed was not significantly reduced. Data show no significant difference in risk of stage ≥ 3 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP (...) Early erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in preterm or low birth weight infants. Preterm infants have low plasma levels of erythropoietin (EPO), providing a rationale for the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) to prevent or treat anaemia and to provide neuro protection and protection against necrotising enterocolitis (NEC). Darbepoetin (Darbe) and EPO are currently available ESAs.To assess the effectiveness and safety of ESAs (erythropoietin (EPO) and/or Darbe) initiated early

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2017 Cochrane

91. Interventions to change the behaviour of health professionals and the organisation of care to promote weight reduction in children and adults with overweight or obesity. (PubMed)

or obesity and four recruited children with obesity. Eight studies had an overall high risk of bias, and four had a low risk of bias. In total, 139 practices provided care to 89,754 people, with a median follow-up of 12 months. Professional interventions Educational interventions aimed at general practitioners (GPs), may slightly reduce the weight of participants (mean difference (MD) -1.24 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.84 to 0.37; 3 studies, N = 1017 adults; low-certainty evidence).Tailoring (...) increase in the BMI of children who received care at intervention clinics (BMI change: adjusted MD -0.21, 95% CI -0.50 to 0.07; 1 study, unadjusted MD -0.18, 95% CI -0.20 to -0.16; N=473 participants; moderate-certainty evidence).Mail and phone interventions probably lead to little or no difference in weight loss in adults (mean weight change (kg) using mail: -0.36, 95% CI -1.18 to 0.46; phone: -0.44, 95% CI -1.26 to 0.38; 1 study, N = 1801 adults; moderate-certainty evidence). Care delivered

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2017 Cochrane

92. High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

to November 2016), as well as conference proceedings, previous reviews, and trial registries.Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared high-volume versus standard-volume enteral feeds for preterm or low birth weight infants.Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias and independently extracted data. We analysed treatment effects in individual trials and reported the risk ratio and risk difference for dichotomous data, and the mean difference for continuous data (...) , with respective 95% confidence intervals. . We assessed the quality of evidence at the outcome level via the GRADE approach.We found one eligible trial that included 64 infants. This trial was not blinded. Analysis showed a higher rate of weight gain in the high-volume feeds group: mean difference 6.20 g/kg/d (95% confidence interval 2.71 to 9.69). There was no increase in the risk of feed intolerance or necrotising enterocolitis with high-volume feeds, but 95% confidence intervals around these estimates were

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2017 Cochrane

93. The short, medium and long-term clinical outcomes of bone tunnel changes, graft maturity and return to exercise in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with different surgical methods, different grafts and different age groups: a system

subgroup is required. If meta‐analysis is not possible, data will be reported through a descriptive summary. ">Planned approach If a meta-analysis is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies (...) by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference or risk ration as effect measure and containing at least 20 studies, we will produce funnel plots and assess publication bias using Egger’s regression test. ">Publication bias

2019 PROSPERO

94. What is the meaning of quality of life for children with physical disabilities? A meta-synthesis of qualitative data

is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However (...) with data from the latest possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference

2019 PROSPERO

95. Sodium fluoride: a systematic review of how an old marker gains a new meaning

the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However, this assumption is unlikely to hold (...) possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference or risk ration as effect

2019 PROSPERO

96. Mean platelet volume as a predictor of mortality in patients with sepsis: systematic review and meta-analysis

is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However (...) with data from the latest possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference

2019 PROSPERO

97. Effectiveness of manual therapy and exercise over pain processing by mean biomarkers in animal models: systematic review and meta-analysis

. ">Planned approach If a meta-analysis is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (...) using the mean difference or risk ration as effect measure and containing at least 20 studies, we will produce funnel plots and assess publication bias using Egger’s regression test. ">Publication bias

2019 PROSPERO

98. Systematic review: meaning centered psychotherapy as a strategy for the care of patients with neoplasias

is planned , please specify the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However (...) with data from the latest possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference

2019 PROSPERO

99. Meaning of dementia informal caregiving: a systematic review

the following:"> Example: number of metastases: standardized mean difference; incidence of metastasis: risk ratio. ">Effect measure The random-effects model is the typical model of choice for pre-clinical meta-analyses. This is because in the fixed-effect model, it is assumed that the differences in observed effect between studies is solely due to sampling error (i.e. differences in sample size), and that the true effect is the same (fixed) across all studies. However, this assumption is unlikely to hold (...) possible time point (in studies reporting an outcome at multiple time points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference or risk ration as effect

2019 PROSPERO

100. Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs

words: ; Reception date: 18/01/2017 Acceptance date: 23/01/2017 Publication date: 25/01/2017 Structured Abstract Objective: To estimate the costs and decrease in mortality that could be achieved at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) if the intake of at least 90% of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants was at least 98% human milk. Study design: economic study by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation modelling. Setting: hospital-based study. Study population: simulated population (...) Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs - Evidencias en pediatría Searching, please wait Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. | Search Evidence-Based decision making Evidence-Based decision making Show menu Library

2017 Evidencias en Pediatría

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