How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

445 results for

Wart Immune Therapy

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

41. Warts, Genital (Follow-up)

Warts, Genital (Follow-up) Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Considerations in Specific Patient Subgroups, Pharmacologic Therapy Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). Treatment is reserved for patients with visible warts. The general treatment strategy is to eliminate as many of the visible lesions as possible until the host immune system can control viral replication. Treatment is not recommended for subclinical anogenital or mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the absence of coexistent dysplasia. No evidence demonstrates that treatment eliminates HPV infection or that it decreases infectivity. In fact, warts may

2014 eMedicine.com

42. Warts, Genital (Follow-up)

the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are available. [ , , ] Also see . Untreated If visible genital warts are left untreated, they can undergo spontaneous resolution, increase in size, increase in number, or remain unchanged. Complete resolution of lesions after 2 years occurs in 75% of individuals without intervention. Ablative therapy Cryotherapy [ ] can be used. Use an open spray or cotton-tipped applicator for 10-15 seconds and repeat (...) is delivered to the affected lesions, causing tissue coagulation and necrosis. Treatment is successful in about 80% of cases. Immune-based therapy Physician administered treatments include acid applications (bichloroacetic acid or trichloroacetic acid) and interferon injections with antiviral mechanisms. Medications for home use include imiquimod 5% cream, podofilox gel or solution, and antiproliferative compounds (5-fluorouracil). Vaccination [ , ] The 9-valent HPV vaccine (Gardasil 9 [9vHPV

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

43. Warts, Plantar (Follow-up)

, or symptomatic warts or warts that have been present for more than 2 years. Topical agents Salicylic acid is a first-line therapy used to treat warts. [ ] It is available without a prescription and can be applied by the patient at home. Cure rates from 70-80% are reported. A nonblinded, randomized controlled trial compared treatment of plantar warts with 50% salicylic acid topical (Verrugon) applied daily with cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen (up to 4 treatments 2-3 wk apart). The study found no significant (...) ), and diphencyclopropenone (DCP) are contact sensitizers. Trichloroacetic acid is a caustic compound that causes tissue necrosis. Podophyllin is a cytotoxic compound used more commonly in the treatment of genital warts. Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a photosensitizer that has been successfully used topically in combination with blue light to treat flat warts. [ ] Several prescription medications have proven beneficial in treating warts. These can be applied at home by the patient. Imiquimod is an immune response modifier

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

44. Warts, Genital (Treatment)

the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are available. [ , , ] Also see . Untreated If visible genital warts are left untreated, they can undergo spontaneous resolution, increase in size, increase in number, or remain unchanged. Complete resolution of lesions after 2 years occurs in 75% of individuals without intervention. Ablative therapy Cryotherapy [ ] can be used. Use an open spray or cotton-tipped applicator for 10-15 seconds and repeat (...) is delivered to the affected lesions, causing tissue coagulation and necrosis. Treatment is successful in about 80% of cases. Immune-based therapy Physician administered treatments include acid applications (bichloroacetic acid or trichloroacetic acid) and interferon injections with antiviral mechanisms. Medications for home use include imiquimod 5% cream, podofilox gel or solution, and antiproliferative compounds (5-fluorouracil). Vaccination [ , ] The 9-valent HPV vaccine (Gardasil 9 [9vHPV

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

45. Warts, Plantar (Treatment)

, or symptomatic warts or warts that have been present for more than 2 years. Topical agents Salicylic acid is a first-line therapy used to treat warts. [ ] It is available without a prescription and can be applied by the patient at home. Cure rates from 70-80% are reported. A nonblinded, randomized controlled trial compared treatment of plantar warts with 50% salicylic acid topical (Verrugon) applied daily with cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen (up to 4 treatments 2-3 wk apart). The study found no significant (...) ), and diphencyclopropenone (DCP) are contact sensitizers. Trichloroacetic acid is a caustic compound that causes tissue necrosis. Podophyllin is a cytotoxic compound used more commonly in the treatment of genital warts. Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a photosensitizer that has been successfully used topically in combination with blue light to treat flat warts. [ ] Several prescription medications have proven beneficial in treating warts. These can be applied at home by the patient. Imiquimod is an immune response modifier

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

46. Warts, Genital (Diagnosis)

of external lesions on the genitalia. Previous Next: Patient Education Identify and educate persons at risk. For patient education resources, visit the . Also, see the patient education article . Previous References Diamantis ML, Bartlett BL, Tyring SK. Safety, efficacy & recurrence rates of imiquimod cream 5% for treatment of anogenital warts. Skin Therapy Lett . 2009 Jun. 14(5):1-3, 5. . [Guideline] American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Human papillomavirus. Washington (DC (...) Warts, Genital (Diagnosis) Genital Warts: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvNzYzMDE0LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Genital Warts Updated: Oct 16, 2018 Author: Delaram

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

47. Warts, Genital (Overview)

of external lesions on the genitalia. Previous Next: Patient Education Identify and educate persons at risk. For patient education resources, visit the . Also, see the patient education article . Previous References Diamantis ML, Bartlett BL, Tyring SK. Safety, efficacy & recurrence rates of imiquimod cream 5% for treatment of anogenital warts. Skin Therapy Lett . 2009 Jun. 14(5):1-3, 5. . [Guideline] American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Human papillomavirus. Washington (DC (...) Warts, Genital (Overview) Genital Warts: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvNzYzMDE0LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Genital Warts Updated: Oct 16, 2018 Author: Delaram

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

48. Absence of γ-chain in keratinocytes alters chemokine secretion resulting in reduced immune cell recruitment. (PubMed)

Absence of γ-chain in keratinocytes alters chemokine secretion resulting in reduced immune cell recruitment. Loss-of-function mutations in the common gamma (γc) chain cytokine receptor subunit give rise to severe combined immunodeficiency characterized by lack of T and natural killer cells and infant death from infection. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy offer a cure, but despite successful replacement of lymphoid immune lineages, a long-term risk of severe cutaneous (...) -deficient keratinocytes also exhibit defective induction of T-cell chemotaxis in a model of stable human papilloma virus-18 infection. These findings suggest that persistent γc-deficiency in keratinocytes alters immune cell recruitment to the skin, which may contribute to the development and persistence of warts in this condition and would require different treatment approaches.Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Journal of Investigative Dermatology

49. Safety Study of Multikine in the Treatment of Perianal Warts

Safety Study of Multikine in the Treatment of Perianal Warts Safety Study of Multikine in the Treatment of Perianal Warts - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Safety Study of Multikine (...) in the Treatment of Perianal Warts The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02115919 Recruitment Status : Terminated (Unable to enroll prospective subject for dose escalation) First Posted : April 16, 2014 Last Update Posted : August 19, 2016 Sponsor: United States Naval Medical Center, San Diego

2013 Clinical Trials

50. Efficacy and Safety of SR-T100 Gel in Common Warts (CW) Patients

. Patient agrees not to use wart-removing product/modality (prescription or over-the-counter) other than the study product during the course of the study; and is willing to refrain from using cosmetics or other topical products in the treatment area for the duration of the study. Any non-target CW receiving wart-removing procedures including cryotherapy and surgical therapy should be at least 5 cm apart from the target lesions. Patient is free of any systemic or dermatologic disorder, which (...) study. Patient had used any wart-removing product/modality in the treatment area within 30 days prior to the Randomization visit or received cryotherapy in the treatment area within 60 days prior to the Randomization visit. Patient who has immune-compromised conditions, have required or will require systemic intake of immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory medication (oral or parental corticosteroids are included) within 30 days prior to the Randomization visit or during the course of the study

2013 Clinical Trials

51. Oral Zinc Gluconate as Treatment for Recalcitrant Cutaneous Warts: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Posted : February 4, 2013 Last Update Posted : November 14, 2013 Sponsor: Philippine Dermatological Society Information provided by (Responsible Party): Rochelle L. Castillo, Philippine Dermatological Society Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Up to one-third of common warts can remain recalcitrant, an occurrence that has been attributed to impaired cell-mediated immunity. At present, no guidelines exist for the management of recalcitrant cutaneous warts. Zinc, a well-established (...) Oral Zinc Gluconate as Treatment for Recalcitrant Cutaneous Warts: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial Oral Zinc Gluconate as Treatment for Recalcitrant Cutaneous Warts: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum

2013 Clinical Trials

52. Safety and Efficacy Study to Test Topical AS101 for External Genital Warts

the most common sexually transmitted diseases. There are a wide variety of available treatments of genital warts, but none are considered completely effective. It has been suggested that AS101 works by stimulating the innate and acquired arms of the immune system. In previous proof-of-concept clinical study AS101 topical cream was tested on HPV warts and shown cure in high percentages. However the cream formulation was unstable therefore a new formulation was developed mainly for the carrier (...) to Day 1 (patients on long-term suppressive antiviral therapy are eligible); Current and/or recurrent pathologically relevant genital infections other than genital warts; Diagnosis of high-grade cervical dysplasia; Internal anogenital, vaginal, urethral and cervical warts requiring treatment; Chronic or acute skin condition that might interfere with the evaluation of the treatment or study drug effect; Cutaneous surgery, including cryosurgery, to genital area within 30 days of Day 1; Screening

2012 Clinical Trials

53. A Comparative Study of Occlusive Heat Patch in the Treatment of Warts

warts with heat is the use of an occlusive patch that contains a mixture of chemicals (ferric chloride), which in the presence of oxygen reacts to generate reproducible thermal warming of the skin to a temperature of 42-43ºC for at least two hours. The heat is believed to alter the immune response and kill the HPV virus in the wart tissue. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 31 participants Intervention Model: Single (...) , genital, or head regions or have mosaic warts. Subjects with verruca, for treatment, that is associated with significant scarring from prior therapy in the opinion of the investigator. Subjects who are unable to communicate or cooperate with the Investigator due to language problems, poor mental development, or impaired cerebral function. Subjects with any condition which, in the investigator's opinion, would make it unsafe for the subject to participate in a research study. Subjects with a history

2012 Clinical Trials

54. Warts and all: Human papillomavirus in primary immunodeficiencies. (PubMed)

Warts and all: Human papillomavirus in primary immunodeficiencies. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2012 Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

55. Phase 1 clinical trial of intralesional injection of Candida antigen for the treatment of warts. (PubMed)

Letter Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't United States Arch Dermatol 0372433 0003-987X 0 Antigens, Fungal AIM IM Adolescent Adult Antigens, Fungal administration & dosage Candida immunology Dermatitis drug therapy immunology Female Humans Immunity, Cellular Immunotherapy methods Injections, Intralesional Male Middle Aged Retrospective Studies Treatment Outcome Warts drug therapy immunology Young Adult 2010 12 22 6 0 2010 12 22 6 0 2011 3 16 6 0 ppublish 21173332 146/12/1431 (...) Phase 1 clinical trial of intralesional injection of Candida antigen for the treatment of warts. 21173332 2011 03 15 2010 12 21 1538-3652 146 12 2010 Dec Archives of dermatology Arch Dermatol Phase 1 clinical trial of intralesional injection of Candida antigen for the treatment of warts. 1431-3 10.1001/archdermatol.2010.350 Kim Kevin H KH Horn Thomas D TD Pharis Joni J Kincannon Jay J Jones Robert R O'Bryan Kevin K Myers Jennifer J Nakagawa Mayumi M eng Clinical Trial, Phase I Comparative Study

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2011 Archives of Dermatology

56. Throwing off warts. (PubMed)

Throwing off warts. 698552 1978 12 20 2018 11 13 0007-1447 2 6136 1978 Aug 19 British medical journal Br Med J Throwing off warts. 521-2 eng Editorial England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Antibodies, Viral AIM IM Antibodies, Viral Humans Immunity, Cellular Skin Diseases immunology therapy Warts immunology therapy 1978 8 19 1978 8 19 0 1 1978 8 19 0 0 ppublish 698552 PMC1607013 Clin Exp Immunol. 1976 Dec;26(3):419-24 188577 Arch Dermatol. 1978 Feb;114(2):213-5 305230 Arch Dermatol. 1977 Sep;113

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1978 British medical journal

57. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial. (PubMed)

<0.01). In comparison to the early group, there was a significantly higher incidence of candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value <0.01). In the delayed group the incidence of oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value <0.01). The incidence of oral warts increased (...) after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 PloS one

58. Genital Warts

are highly effective unless applied repeatedly over weeks to months. Genital warts may resolve without treatment in immunocompetent patients but may persist and spread widely in patients with decreased cell-mediated immunity (eg, due to pregnancy or HIV infection). Vaccines are available to protect against many of the HPV strains that can cause genital warts and cancer. (See also .) HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD). HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women (...) . Prevention reference 1. : Use of a 2-dose schedule for human papillomavirus vaccination: Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 65 (49):1405–1408, 2016. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6549a5. Key Points Genital warts are caused by a few types of human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV types 16 and 18 cause about 70% of cervical cancers and can cause cancer in other areas, including the vulva, vagina, penis, and oropharynx. Diagnose warts by inspection; HPV

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

59. Warts

and maceration facilitate initial epidermal inoculation. Spread may then occur by autoinoculation. Local and systemic immune factors appear to influence spread; immunosuppressed patients (especially those with HIV infection or a kidney transplant) are at particular risk of developing generalized lesions that are difficult to treat. provides resistance to HPV infection; cellular immunity helps established infection to regress. Symptoms and Signs Warts are named by their clinical appearance and location (...) , even with treatment. Factors influencing recurrence appear to be related to the patient’s overall immune status as well as local factors. Patients subject to local trauma (eg, athletes, mechanics, butchers) may have recalcitrant and recurrent HPV infection. Genital HPV infection has malignant potential, but malignant transformation is rare in HPV-induced skin warts, except among immunosuppressed patients. Treatment Topical irritants (eg, salicylic acid , cantharidin , podophyllum resin

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

60. Carbon Dioxide Laser vs. Electrocoagulation for the Therapy of Condyloma

to Share IPD: No Keywords provided by Dr. med. Ziad Hilal, Zydolab - Institute of Cytology and Immune Cytochemistry: Sexually transmitted disease Genital Warts Venereal Warts Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Condylomata Acuminata Warts Papillomavirus Infections DNA Virus Infections Virus Diseases Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral Sexually Transmitted Diseases Skin Diseases, Viral Tumor Virus Infections Skin Diseases, Infectious Skin Diseases (...) Carbon Dioxide Laser vs. Electrocoagulation for the Therapy of Condyloma Carbon Dioxide Laser vs. Electrocoagulation for the Therapy of Condyloma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Carbon

2015 Clinical Trials

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>