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445 results for

Wart Immune Therapy

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441. Oral zinc sulphate in the treatment of recalcitrant viral warts: randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. (PubMed)

Oral zinc sulphate in the treatment of recalcitrant viral warts: randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. Viral warts are common dermatological diseases; although the rate of spontaneous recovery is high, it usually takes a long time, and some patients might not show this spontaneous healing. Zinc has an important effect on the immune system and it has been used as an immunomodulator to treat a variety of skin disorders.To assess whether oral zinc was effective in treating viral warts (...) after 2 months of therapy. The response to treatment was directly related to the increment in serum zinc level. No patient of the placebo-treated group showed any response.We conclude that zinc sulphate at a dose of 10 mg kg(-1) daily seems to be a highly efficacious therapeutic option for recalcitrant viral warts and proved to be safe with few adverse effects.

2002 The British journal of dermatology

442. Treatment of anogenital warts with imiquimod 5% cream followed by surgical excision of residual lesions. (PubMed)

Treatment of anogenital warts with imiquimod 5% cream followed by surgical excision of residual lesions. Cytodestructive or surgical therapy for patients with anogenital warts is frequently associated with recurrence. In February 1997, the US Food and Drug Administration approved imiquimod as a 5% cream for the treatment of anogenital warts. Activity of the drug results primarily from interferon alfa and other cytokine induction in the skin. These cytokines stimulate several other aspects (...) of the innate immune response. In addition, imiquimod stimulates acquired immunity, in particular the cellular arm that is important for control of viral infections and tumors. Published studies indicate that imiquimod results in complete clearance of warts in more than 50% of patients. Residual warts can be surgically excised. Our long-term follow-up (ie, 2 to 7 years) of patients who had a 16-week course of imiquimod cream with subsequent removal of remaining warts showed a much lower rate of recurrence

2002 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

443. Viral warts in organ transplant recipients: new aspects in therapy. (PubMed)

Viral warts in organ transplant recipients: new aspects in therapy. The long-term success of organ transplantation depends on the prevention of allograft rejection and improvement in quality of life for the patients. This has been achieved through better immunosuppressive regimens with lower dosages and a new generation of immunosuppressive drugs. However, these immunosuppressive agents not only impair the patient's reactivity to the graft, but also to infectious organisms, thereby making them (...) more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens. Because of this, organ transplant recipients are predisposed to epithelial malignancies and infections. The majority of transplant recipients will develop warts induced by human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of these viral warts may present with atypical histological features and may progress into squamous cell carcinomas. The risk for cutaneous cancers after transplantation is much higher than in the immunocompetent population. Current therapies for HPV

2003 British Journal of Dermatology

444. Plantar warts treated with an immune response modifier: a report of two cases. (PubMed)

Plantar warts treated with an immune response modifier: a report of two cases. Viral warts are the most common disease of the skin and are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Plantar warts, a manifestation of infection by HPV-1, -2 and -4, tend to be smoother and flatter than common warts and can also be painful when pressure is applied. A variety of local treatments, including topical salicyclic acid, cryotherapy, topical 5-fluorouracil, intralesional interferons and photodynamic therapy (...) , are available to treat plantar warts. Here we report two cases of plantar warts, which had been previously treated without success. Total clearance of the warts was observed in both cases after treatment with imiquimod 5% cream over a period of 12 weeks. No evidence of local skin reactions was observed in either case during the treatment period. Recurrent lesions were not evident in the follow-up period for each patient.

2003 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

445. Evaluation of imiquimod for the therapy of external genital and anal warts in comparison with destructive therapies. (PubMed)

Evaluation of imiquimod for the therapy of external genital and anal warts in comparison with destructive therapies. External genital and anal warts (acuminate condyloma) were the first medical indication the topical immune response modifier imiquimod was approved for in 1997. Since then, many placebo controlled randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of this synthetic imidazoquinoline derivate for the treatment of different human papillomavirus infections (...) and tumours. Treatment modalities for genital warts (5% cream, three times weekly, minimum duration 4 weeks, control of side-effects) have been optimized and assured by further clinical trials and meta-analyses. For a few years clinical studies focussed on the long-term efficacy of the immunomodulatory therapy (sustained clearance from warts) and most recent studies compared the efficacy of ablative, destructive and imiquimod monotherapy as well as combination therapies.

2007 British Journal of Dermatology

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