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Vocal Cord Dysfunction

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1. Current Epidemiology of Vocal Cord Dysfunction After Congenital Heart Surgery in Young Infants. (PubMed)

Current Epidemiology of Vocal Cord Dysfunction After Congenital Heart Surgery in Young Infants. Surgery of the aortic arch poses risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury due to the anatomic proximity and can manifest as vocal cord dysfunction after surgery. We assessed risk factors for vocal cord dysfunction and calculated surgical procedure associated rates in young infants after congenital heart surgery.Cross section analysis.Forty-four children's hospitals reporting administrative data (...) to Pediatric Health Information System.Cardiac surgical patients less than or equal to 90 days old and discharged between January 2004 and June 2014.None.Overall, 2,319 of 46,567 subjects (5%) had vocal cord dysfunction, increasing from 4% to 7% over the study period. Of those with vocal cord dysfunction, 75% had unilateral partial paralysis. Vocal cord dysfunction was significantly more common in newborn infants (74%), those with aortic arch procedures (77%) and with greater surgical complexity. Rates

2019 Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

2. Hyperventilation-related hyperlactataemia in a case of paroxysmal vocal cord dysfunction (PubMed)

Hyperventilation-related hyperlactataemia in a case of paroxysmal vocal cord dysfunction Paroxysmal Vocal Cords Dysfunction(PVCD), also known as paradoxical vocal cord motion, is abnormal adduction of the vocal cords during inspiration. Like asthma, PCVD can be triggered by breathing in lung irritants, upper respiratory infection or exercise. However, unlike asthma, PCVD is not an immune system reaction and does not involve the lower airways. Treatment for the two conditions differs. Plasma

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2016 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

3. Co-existence of vocal cord dysfunction with pulmonary conditions other than asthma: A case series (PubMed)

Co-existence of vocal cord dysfunction with pulmonary conditions other than asthma: A case series Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is defined as inappropriate movement of the vocal cords resulting in functional airway obstruction and symptoms including cough, wheezing, and dyspnea. VCD is often misdiagnosed with asthma but can also co-exist with asthma. The association of VCD with other serious pulmonary conditions has not been described to date.We describe the first case series of two adult

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2018 Respiratory Medicine Case Reports

4. Vocal cord dysfunction following esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair. (PubMed)

Vocal cord dysfunction following esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair. The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors and long-term outcomes in patients with esophageal atresia +/-tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) with vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) owing to recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury.A retrospective chart review was performed for EA/TEF patients repaired at our institution from 1999 to 2014 (REB #1000032265).Of 197 patients, 22 (11.2%) were (...) diagnosed with VCD by indirect laryngoscopy following EA/TEF repair. Aspiration was documented on video swallow study for 21 patients, and as a result, 13 required thickened feeds and 8 required gastrostomy tube feeds. Of the 16 H-type TEF patients, 8 (50%) had VCD. Following discharge, 20 (90.9%) patients with VCD eventually tolerated full feeds orally without aspiration but only 8 (36.4%) had documented recovery of vocal cord movement at long-term follow up (mean 452 days). Overall, patients with VCD

2018 Journal of Pediatric Surgery

5. Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) - Twitter summary from #CSACI18 meeting

Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) - Twitter summary from #CSACI18 meeting Allergy Notes: Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) - Twitter summary from #CSACI18 meeting Allergy, Asthma and Immunology News Updated Daily by Board-certified Allergist at Cleveland Clinic Florida Pages Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) - Twitter summary from #CSACI18 meeting Twitter summary: Dr. Timothy Brown (Dalhousie U) talked about vocal cord dysfunction. When puffers don't help: A review of Vocal Cord Dysfunction by ENT (Dr. Tim (...) Brown). Dr Tim Brown is the last speaker for this session who will speak on a much under-diagnosed topic: Vocal Cord Dysfunction, aka Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder (PVFMD). Least important function of the larynx is speech as per Dr. T. Brown. Larynx as a voice box is the least important function; it did not evolve to do that, but for proper respiratory function. In humans, the vocal cords are like a reed instrument with the rest of our speech determined by changes in the tongue, mouth, etc

2018 Allergy Notes blog

6. Acute Management of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion (Vocal Cord Dysfunction). (PubMed)

Acute Management of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion (Vocal Cord Dysfunction). Paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder, also commonly termed vocal cord dysfunction, is a poorly understood cause of acute upper airway obstruction. Patients with paradoxical vocal fold motion frequently present to the emergency department (ED) with acute respiratory distress and stridor. Lack of familiarity with this disorder may lead to delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis and unnecessary intubations or surgical airway (...) procedures. Although long-term management of paradoxical vocal fold motion is well described, there is a paucity of information about acute evaluation and management. This article aims to summarize the ED presentation and management of paradoxical vocal fold motion.Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2016 Annals of Emergency Medicine

7. Listen closely to this podcast about Vocal Cord Dysfunction

Listen closely to this podcast about Vocal Cord Dysfunction Listen closely to this podcast about Vocal Cord Dysfunction – PEMBlog Search for: Search for: Listen closely to this podcast about Vocal Cord Dysfunction Vocal cord dysfunction, AKA paradoxical vocal fold motion is more common than you might think. Patients often present to the Emergency Department in respiratory distress and “wheezing.” Learn about the diagnosis itself, different phenotypes and what treatment options are out (...) there. Listen to the full episode right here References Christopher KL, Wood RP 2nd, Eckert RC, Blager FB, Raney RA, Souhrada JF. Vocal-cord dysfunction presenting as asthma. N Engl J Med.1983;308 :1566– 1570 Doshi D, Weinberger M. Long-term outcome of vocal cord dysfunction. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol.2006;96 :794– 799 Weinberger M, Abu-Hasan M. Pseudo-asthma: when cough, wheezing, and dyspnea are not asthma. Pediatrics. 2007 Oct;120(4):855-64. By | 2017-05-25T11:46:41-04:00 May 25th, 2017 | , | Share

2017 PEM Blog

8. Vocal cord dysfunction: a functional cause of respiratory distress (PubMed)

Vocal cord dysfunction: a functional cause of respiratory distress VCD has several clinical and physiological phenotypes, which should be individually identifiedhttp://ow.ly/orfb309fMxh.

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2017 Breathe

9. Association of breathing sound spectra with glottal dimensions in exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction (PubMed)

Association of breathing sound spectra with glottal dimensions in exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between the breathing sound spectra and glottal dimensions in exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction (EIVCD) during a bicycle ergometry test. Nineteen subjects (mean age 21.8 years and range 13-39 years) with suspected EIVCD were studied. Vocal folds were continuously imaged with videolaryngoscopy and breathing sounds were recorded (...) during the bicycle exercise test. Twelve subjects showed paradoxical movement of the vocal folds during inspiration by the end of the exercise. In seven subjects, no abnormal reactions in vocal folds were found; they served as control subjects. The glottal quotient (interarytenoid distance divided by the anteroposterior glottal distance) was calculated. From the same time period, the tracheal-vocal tract resonance peaks of the breathing sound spectra were analyzed, and stridor sounds were detected

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2017 European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

10. Differentiating vocal cord dysfunction from asthma (PubMed)

Differentiating vocal cord dysfunction from asthma Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD)-associated symptoms are not rare in pediatric patients. Dyspnea, wheezing, stridor, chest pain or tightness and throat discomfort are the most commonly encountered symptoms. They may occur either at rest or more commonly during exercise in patients with VCD, as well as in asthmatic subjects. The phase of respiration (inspiration rather than expiration), the location of the wheezing origin, the rapid resolution

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2017 Journal of asthma and allergy

11. Consensus Statement: Using Laryngeal Electromyography for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Vocal Cord Paralysis

, Richards W, Lukanich J, Mentzer SJ, et al. Prevention, early detection and management of complication after 328 consecutive extrapleural pneumonectomies. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2004;128:138–146. 4. Filiare M, Mom T, Laurent S, Harouna Y, Naamee A, Vallet L, et al. Vocal cord dysfunction after left lung resection for cancer. Eur J Car- diothorac Surg 2001;20:705–711. 5. Dimarakis I, Protopapas AD. Vocal cord palsy as a complication of adult cardiac surgery: surgical correlations and analysis. Eur J (...) Consensus Statement: Using Laryngeal Electromyography for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Vocal Cord Paralysis AANEM PRACTICE TOPIC CONSENSUS STATEMENT: USING LARYNGEAL ELECTROMYOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS MICHAEL C. MUNIN, MD, 1 YOLANDA D. HEMAN-ACKAH, MD, MS, 2,3 CLARK A. ROSEN, MD, 4 LUCIAN SULICA, MD, 5 NICOLE MARONIAN, MD, 6 STEVEN MANDEL, MD, 7 BRIDGET T. CAREY, MD, 8 EARL CRAIG, MD, 9 and GARY GRONSETH, MD 10 1 Department of Physical Medicine

2016 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

12. Consensus statement: using laryngeal electromyography for the diagnosis and treatment of vocal cord paralysis

, Richards W, Lukanich J, Mentzer SJ, et al. Prevention, early detection and management of complication after 328 consecutive extrapleural pneumonectomies. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2004;128:138–146. 4. Filiare M, Mom T, Laurent S, Harouna Y, Naamee A, Vallet L, et al. Vocal cord dysfunction after left lung resection for cancer. Eur J Car- diothorac Surg 2001;20:705–711. 5. Dimarakis I, Protopapas AD. Vocal cord palsy as a complication of adult cardiac surgery: surgical correlations and analysis. Eur J (...) Consensus statement: using laryngeal electromyography for the diagnosis and treatment of vocal cord paralysis AANEM PRACTICE TOPIC CONSENSUS STATEMENT: USING LARYNGEAL ELECTROMYOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS MICHAEL C. MUNIN, MD, 1 YOLANDA D. HEMAN-ACKAH, MD, MS, 2,3 CLARK A. ROSEN, MD, 4 LUCIAN SULICA, MD, 5 NICOLE MARONIAN, MD, 6 STEVEN MANDEL, MD, 7 BRIDGET T. CAREY, MD, 8 EARL CRAIG, MD, 9 and GARY GRONSETH, MD 10 1 Department of Physical Medicine

2016 American Academy of Neurology

13. The Incidence and Impact of Vocal Cord Dysfunction In Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery

The Incidence and Impact of Vocal Cord Dysfunction In Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery The Incidence and Impact of Vocal Cord Dysfunction In Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more (...) studies before adding more. The Incidence and Impact of Vocal Cord Dysfunction In Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02996526 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted

2016 Clinical Trials

14. The morbidity and cost of vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma. (PubMed)

The morbidity and cost of vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma. Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is frequently misdiagnosed and mistreated as asthma, which leads to morbidity secondary to unnecessary medication use and increased health care utilization.We identified discriminating symptoms and triggers, and analyzed the costs, morbidity, and health care burden associated with misdiagnosis of VCD as asthma. We sought to determine if current measures of asthma control contributed

2016 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

15. Clinical associations in the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction. (PubMed)

Clinical associations in the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction. Diagnosis of VCD is complicated by its symptom similarities to asthma. Although clinical history, spirometry, and fiberoptic nasolaryngoscopy are used for VCD diagnosis, videostroboscopy is considered the gold standard. However, little is know about patient characteristics that might suggest a VCD diagnosis is more likely.To identify clinical characteristics of patients suspected of having VCD that would increase the likelihood

2016 Asthma & Immunology

16. Vocal Cord Dysfunction

Vocal Cord Dysfunction Vocal Cord Dysfunction Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Vocal Cord Dysfunction Vocal Cord (...) Dysfunction Aka: Vocal Cord Dysfunction , Paradoxical Vocal Cord Dysfunction , Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion , Factitious Asthma , Munchausen's Stridor From Related Chapters II. Definition Inappropriate vocal cord motion transiently obstructs airway remain in adduction despite inspiration III. Symptoms Recurrent episodes Throat tightness sensation may be mis-reported by patients as IV. Causes: Precipitating factors of Vocal Cord Dysfunction May present as induced Psychiatric conditions Common

2018 FP Notebook

17. Breathing-related changes of respiratory resistance in vocal cord dysfunction. (PubMed)

Breathing-related changes of respiratory resistance in vocal cord dysfunction. Vocal cord dysfunction induced by exercise in children with uncontrolled asthma was identified by laryngoscopy. The paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords was also indicated by the breathing-related changes of the forced oscillation respiratory resistance showing prominent increase during inspiration and a large positive difference between inspiration and expiration. The breathing-related changes of respiratory (...) resistance offer thus a useful first-line technique to diagnose vocal cord dysfunction.© 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

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2016 Respirology

18. Behavioral Therapy Helps Athletes Overcome Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD)

Behavioral Therapy Helps Athletes Overcome Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) Allergy Notes: Behavioral Therapy Helps Athletes Overcome Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) Allergy, Asthma and Immunology News Updated Daily by Board-certified Allergist at Cleveland Clinic Florida Pages Behavioral Therapy Helps Athletes Overcome Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) From National Jewish: "A new study shows that a novel, nonsurgical approach to treating vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) can help 3 out of 4 adolescent (...) athletes, who did not respond to conventional therapy, breathe better during training and competition. Vocal cord dysfunction (also known as exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction) is a common condition characterized by the throat inexplicably closing during rigorous exercise. It can dramatically increase breathing difficulty, diminish performance and often causes panic in those who experience it. “It’s terrifying for these patients. Imagine running a race, then being forced to breathe through a straw

2016 Allergy Notes blog

19. The Role of Vocal Rest After Removal of Benign Lesions From Vocal Cord

the patients into 2 groups: the first group will be instructed for a postoperative voice rest and the second group will not. Later the investigators will compare the results and conclude whether voice rest had any significance. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Vocal Fold Polyp Vocal Cord Dysfunction Behavioral: post operative voice rest Behavioral: No voice rest Not Applicable Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated (...) First Posted: February 8, 2017 Last Update Posted: April 11, 2018 Last Verified: April 2018 Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement: Plan to Share IPD: Undecided Layout table for additional information Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Keywords provided by Rambam Health Care Campus: voice rest laryngeal surgery glottic polyp glottic cyst Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Vocal Cord Dysfunction Laryngeal

2017 Clinical Trials

20. Arytenoid vertical height discrepancy in predicting outcomes after unilateral vocal cord medialization. (PubMed)

Arytenoid vertical height discrepancy in predicting outcomes after unilateral vocal cord medialization. Unilateral vocal fold paralysis is a structural abnormality that often occurs secondary to dysfunction of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and typically presents as a breathy voice. Medialization laryngoplasty is a constellation of procedures that improves apposition of the vocal cords. Many patients, however, fail to experience sufficient improvement in vocal quality postoperatively despite (...) apparent glottic closure on stroboscopy. This suggests that asymmetry in other cord characteristics may also have acoustic consequences. Our hypothesis is that arytenoid height symmetry may play a significant role in vocal quality. To our knowledge there are no human observational studies examining this topic. We therefore aimed to correlate asymmetry in arytenoid height and patient-reported satisfaction in voice quality after thyroplasty.Retrospective cohort analysis.A retrospective review

2019 Laryngoscope

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