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Vitamin K

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1. Prophylactic vitamin K for the prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in preterm neonates. (PubMed)

Prophylactic vitamin K for the prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in preterm neonates. Vitamin K is necessary for the synthesis of coagulation factors. Term infants, especially those who are exclusively breast fed, are deficient in vitamin K and consequently may have vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB). Preterm infants are potentially at greater risk for VKDB because of delayed feeding and subsequent delay in the colonization of their gastrointestinal system with vitamin K producing (...) microflora, as well as immature hepatic and hemostatic function.  OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis in the prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) in preterm infants.We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 5 December 2016), Embase (1980 to 5 December 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to 5 December 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases

2018 Cochrane

2. Association of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Among Patients Taking Non-Vitamin K Antagonist vs Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants With In-Hospital Mortality. (PubMed)

Association of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Among Patients Taking Non-Vitamin K Antagonist vs Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants With In-Hospital Mortality. Although non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used to prevent thromboembolic disease, there are limited data on NOAC-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).To assess the association between preceding oral anticoagulant use (warfarin, NOACs, and no oral anticoagulants [OACs]) and in-hospital mortality among

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2018 JAMA

3. Prothrombin Complex Concentrates for Perioperative Vitamin K Antagonist and Non-vitamin K Anticoagulant Reversal

Prothrombin Complex Concentrates for Perioperative Vitamin K Antagonist and Non-vitamin K Anticoagulant Reversal Vitamin K antagonist therapy is associated with an increased bleeding risk, and clinicians often reverse anticoagulation in patients who require emergency surgical procedures. Current guidelines for rapid anticoagulation reversal for emergency surgery recommend four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate and vitamin K coadministration. The authors reviewed the current evidence (...) on prothrombin complex concentrate treatment for vitamin K antagonist reversal in the perioperative setting, focusing on comparative studies and in the context of intracranial hemorrhage and cardiac surgery. The authors searched Cochrane Library and PubMed between January 2008 and December 2017 and retrieved 423 English-language papers, which they then screened for relevance to the perioperative setting; they identified 36 papers to include in this review. Prothrombin complex concentrate therapy

2018 EvidenceUpdates

4. Factor Xa inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. (PubMed)

Factor Xa inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. Factor Xa inhibitors and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are now recommended in treatment guidelines for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events in people with atrial fibrillation (AF). This is an update of a Cochrane review previously published in 2013.To assess the effectiveness and safety of treatment with factor Xa inhibitors versus VKAs for preventing

2018 Cochrane

6. Guidelines for vitamin K prophylaxis in newborns

Guidelines for vitamin K prophylaxis in newborns Newborns are at risk for vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) caused by inadequate prenatal storage and deficiency of vitamin K in breast milk. Systematic review of evidence to date suggests that a single intramuscular (IM) injection of vitamin K at birth effectively prevents VKDB. Current scientific data suggest that single or repeated doses of oral (PO) vitamin K are less effective than IM vitamin K in preventing VKDB. The Canadian Paediatric (...) Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada recommend routine IM administration of a single dose of vitamin K at 0.5 mg to 1.0 mg to all newborns. Administering PO vitamin K (2.0 mg at birth, repeated at 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 weeks of age), should be confined to newborns whose parents decline IM vitamin K. Health care providers should clarify with parents that newborns are at increased risk of VKDB if such a regimen is chosen. Current evidence is insufficient to recommend routine intravenous

2018 CPG Infobase

7. Uninterrupted non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants versus uninterrupted vitamin K antagonists for atrial fibrillation ablation: an updated meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies

Uninterrupted non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants versus uninterrupted vitamin K antagonists for atrial fibrillation ablation: an updated meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility

2019 PROSPERO

8. Vitamin K antagonists versus low-molecular-weight heparin for the long term treatment of symptomatic venous thromboembolism. (PubMed)

Vitamin K antagonists versus low-molecular-weight heparin for the long term treatment of symptomatic venous thromboembolism. People with venous thromboembolism (VTE) generally are treated for five days with intravenous unfractionated heparin or subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), followed by three months of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Treatment with VKAs requires regular laboratory measurements and carries risk of bleeding; some patients have contraindications to such treatment

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2017 Cochrane

9. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis. (PubMed)

Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose (...) and frequency of use of these supplements. This is an updated version of the review.To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use.We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books

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2017 Cochrane

10. Net Clinical Benefit of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Versus Vitamin K Antagonist Anticoagulants in Elderly Patients With Atrial Fibrillation. (PubMed)

Net Clinical Benefit of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Versus Vitamin K Antagonist Anticoagulants in Elderly Patients With Atrial Fibrillation. The risks of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events in patients with atrial fibrillation both increase with age; therefore, net clinical benefit analyses of anticoagulant treatments in the elderly population are crucial to guide treatment. We evaluated the 1-year clinical outcomes with non-vitamin-K antagonist and vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

2019 American Journal of Medicine

11. Are New Oral Anticoagulants Safer Than Vitamin K Antagonists in the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism?

Are New Oral Anticoagulants Safer Than Vitamin K Antagonists in the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism? TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Patients with acute venous thromboembolism treated with new oralanticoagulants have similar rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism and death as those treated with warfarin. Although new oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower incidence of major bleeding, there may be an increased incidence of myocardial infarction. Are New Oral Anticoagulants Safer Than Vitamin K (...) and the other 2 receiving a score of 4. Commentary The vitamin k antagonist warfarin has been the cornerstone of anti- coagulation therapy for the past 50 years. Although an effective anticoagulant, it has several limi- tations, including interactions with multiple medications and foods, genetic polymorphisms, and the need for frequent inter- national normalized ratio moni- toring. In addition, warfarin is initially prothrombotic and so may require bridging with another anticoagulant. Because

2016 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

12. Management of Patients on Non?Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in the Acute Care and Periprocedural Setting: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Management of Patients on Non?Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in the Acute Care and Periprocedural Setting: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association e604 March 7, 2017 Circulation. 2017;135:e604–e633. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000477 ABSTRACT: Non–vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are now widely used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and management of venous thromboembolism. In clinical practice, there is still widespread (...) , and prescriptions for long-term anticoagulation will climb. Anticoagulated patients are vulnerable to spontane- ous, traumatic and perioperative bleeding. Warfarin is a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) that has been used for decades to prevent and treat arterial and venous thromboem- bolism (VTE). More recently, 4 non–vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been approved in the United States as alternatives to warfarin for prevention of stroke resulting from nonvalvular AF (NVAF), and prevention

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2017 American Heart Association

13. Transdermal delivery of vitamin K using dissolving microneedles for the prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding (PubMed)

Transdermal delivery of vitamin K using dissolving microneedles for the prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding Vitamin K deficiency within neonates can result in vitamin K deficiency bleeding. Ensuring that newborns receive vitamin K is particularly critical in places where access to health care and blood products and transfusions is limited. The World Health Organization recommends that newborns receive a 1 mg intramuscular injection of vitamin K at birth. Evidence from multiple (...) surveillance studies shows that the introduction of vitamin K prophylaxis reduces the incidence of vitamin K deficiency bleeding. Despite these recommendations, coverage of vitamin K prophylactic treatment in low-resource settings is limited. An intramuscular injection is the most common method of vitamin K administration in neonates. In low- and middle-income countries, needle sharing may occur, which may result in the spread of bloodborne diseases. The objective of our study was to investigate

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2018 International journal of pharmaceutics

14. Frequency of atrial thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation under treatment with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in comparison to vitamin K antagonists: a systematic review and meta-analysis (PubMed)

Frequency of atrial thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation under treatment with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in comparison to vitamin K antagonists: a systematic review and meta-analysis To assess the frequency of left atrium/left atrial appendage (LA/LAA) thrombus under treatment with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in comparison with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF).PubMed, Web of Science™, EMBASE

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2018 European Journal Of Medical Research

15. Incidence of bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and advanced liver fibrosis on treatment with vitamin K or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants. (PubMed)

Incidence of bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and advanced liver fibrosis on treatment with vitamin K or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants. To investigate the incidence of bleeding events in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients treated with vitamin K (VKAs) or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) screened for the presence of liver fibrosis (LF).Previous studies provided conflicting results on bleeding risk in AF patients with liver disease on VKAs

2018 International journal of cardiology

16. Plasma Response to Deuterium-Labeled Vitamin K Intake Varies by TG Response, but Not Age or Vitamin K Status, in Older and Younger Adults. (PubMed)

Plasma Response to Deuterium-Labeled Vitamin K Intake Varies by TG Response, but Not Age or Vitamin K Status, in Older and Younger Adults. Phylloquinone is the primary form of vitamin K in the diet and circulation. Large intra- and interindividual variances in circulating phylloquinone have been partially attributed to age. However, little is known about the nondietary factors that influence phylloquinone absorption and metabolism. Similarly, it is not known if phylloquinone absorption (...) is altered by the individual's existing vitamin K status.The purpose of this secondary substudy was to compare plasma response with deuterium-labeled phylloquinone intake in older and younger adults after dietary phylloquinone depletion and repletion.Forty-two older [mean ± SD age: 67.2 ± 8.0 y; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2): 25.4 ± 4.6; n = 12 men, 9 women] and younger (mean ± SEM age: 31.8 ± 6.6 y; BMI: 25.5 ± 3.3; n = 9 men, 12 women) adults were maintained on sequential 28-d phylloquinone depletion

2018 Journal of Nutrition

17. What guidance is there available on the use of vitamin K for the management of obstetric cholestasis?

What guidance is there available on the use of vitamin K for the management of obstetric cholestasis? What guidance is there available on the use of vitamin K for the management of obstetric cholestasis? – SPS - Specialist Pharmacy Service – The first stop for professional medicines advice Menu · · ∙ ∙ 20th February 2018 There are currently two UK authoritative guidance documents on the management of obstetric cholestasis. Both give recommendations on the use of vitamin K in the management (...) of obstetric cholestasis. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists recommend that a discussion should take place with the woman regarding the use of vitamin K. Women should be advised that when prothrombin time is prolonged, the use of water-soluble vitamin K (menadiol sodium phosphate) in doses of 5-10mg daily is indicated. When prothrombin time is normal, water soluble vitamin K (menadiol sodium phosphate) in low doses should be used only after careful counselling about the likely benefits

2018 Specialist Pharmacy Services

18. Vitamin K-induced effects on body fat and weight: results from a 3-year vitamin K2 intervention study. (PubMed)

Vitamin K-induced effects on body fat and weight: results from a 3-year vitamin K2 intervention study. Vitamin K status has been linked to fat and glucose metabolism by several authors, but whether high vitamin K intake influences body weight or composition has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that increased vitamin K intake decreases body fat or fat distribution.In a randomized placebo-controlled human intervention trial, 214 postmenopausal women, 55-65 years of age, received (...) either 180 mcg/day of vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7, MK-7) or placebo for 3 years. Osteocalcin (OC) carboxylation was used as a marker for vitamin K status, and fat distribution was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry total body scan.In the total cohort, MK-7 supplementation increased circulating carboxylated OC (cOC) but had no effect on body composition. In those with an above-median response in OC carboxylation ('good responders'), MK-7 treatment resulted in a significant increase in total

2019 European journal of clinical nutrition

19. Impaired testicular signaling of vitamin A and vitamin K contributes to the aberrant composition of the extracellular matrix in idiopathic germ cell aplasia. (PubMed)

Impaired testicular signaling of vitamin A and vitamin K contributes to the aberrant composition of the extracellular matrix in idiopathic germ cell aplasia. To study pathogenic features of the somatic testicular microenvironment associated with idiopathic germ cell aplasia.Cross-sectional study.Tertiary referral center for reproductive medicine.Testicular specimens from men with idiopathic nonobstructive azoospermia (iNOA) prospectively submitted to microdissection testicular sperm extraction (...) matrisome-associated factor IX and its regulator VKORC1 were, instead, coupled with decreased signaling of vitamin K in Leydig cells. An altered expression of a further eight ECM proteins was also found, including laminin-4 and laminin-5. Peripheral levels of the two vitamins were within the reference range in the two cohorts of iNOA men.We identified the pathogenetic signature of the somatic human testicular microenvironment, providing two vitamin-related mechanistic insights related to the molecular

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2019 Fertility and Sterility

20. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Association Between Vitamin K Antagonist Use and Fracture

A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Association Between Vitamin K Antagonist Use and Fracture Vitamin K antagonist (VKA) anticoagulant use is suspected to increase the risk of bone fracture through inhibition of vitamin K-dependent cofactors of bone formation, an effect not seen with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The purpose of our systematic review and meta-analysis is to investigate the association between VKA use and fracture.We searched PubMed, EMBASE

2019 EvidenceUpdates

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