How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

50 results for

Vibrio Cellulitis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Vibrio Cellulitis

Vibrio Cellulitis Vibrio Cellulitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Vibrio Cellulitis Vibrio Cellulitis Aka: Vibrio (...) Cellulitis , Vibrio vulnificus , Vibrio alginolyticus , Vibrio damsela From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Most common cause of shellfish related deaths in U.S. III. Causes Vibrio vulnificus (most common) Vibrio alginolyticus Vibrio damsela IV. Pathophysiology Vibrio vulnificus is halophilic (high salt concentration), brackish, warm water (esp. Gulf Coast states in U.S.) in salt water or brackish fresh water See Warm water (>68 degrees F) Not associated with pollution or fecal waste exposure (most

2018 FP Notebook

2. Non-cholera Vibrio infections

and the clinical presentation of the infection. Definition Non-cholera Vibrio infections are infections caused by Vibrio species other than V cholerae . Vibrio infections are most often associated with consumption of raw or undercooked shellfish, or traumatic exposure to sea or brackish water. They are characterised by diarrhoea and vomiting, sepsis, and/or skin/soft-tissue infections. History and exam presence of risk factors leg pain cellulitis diarrhoea abdominal cramps ear pain eye pain, redness fever (...) Non-cholera Vibrio infections Non-cholera Vibrio infections - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Non-cholera Vibrio infections Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary V vulnificus is the most virulent and can rapidly produce fatal septic shock in immunocompromised patients or those with underlying liver disease. The diagnosis is based on blood, wound, and/or stool cultures

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Non-cholera Vibrio infections

and the clinical presentation of the infection. Definition Non-cholera Vibrio infections are infections caused by Vibrio species other than V cholerae . Vibrio infections are most often associated with consumption of raw or undercooked shellfish, or traumatic exposure to sea or brackish water. They are characterised by diarrhoea and vomiting, sepsis, and/or skin/soft-tissue infections. History and exam presence of risk factors leg pain cellulitis diarrhoea abdominal cramps ear pain eye pain, redness fever (...) Non-cholera Vibrio infections Non-cholera Vibrio infections - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Non-cholera Vibrio infections Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary V vulnificus is the most virulent and can rapidly produce fatal septic shock in immunocompromised patients or those with underlying liver disease. The diagnosis is based on blood, wound, and/or stool cultures

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. Vibrio Cellulitis

Vibrio Cellulitis Vibrio Cellulitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Vibrio Cellulitis Vibrio Cellulitis Aka: Vibrio (...) Cellulitis , Vibrio vulnificus , Vibrio alginolyticus , Vibrio damsela From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Most common cause of shellfish related deaths in U.S. III. Causes Vibrio vulnificus (most common) Vibrio alginolyticus Vibrio damsela IV. Pathophysiology Vibrio vulnificus is halophilic (high salt concentration), brackish, warm water (esp. Gulf Coast states in U.S.) in salt water or brackish fresh water See Warm water (>68 degrees F) Not associated with pollution or fecal waste exposure (most

2015 FP Notebook

5. Vibrio vulnificus infection and liver cirrhosis: a potentially lethal combination Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vibrio vulnificus infection and liver cirrhosis: a potentially lethal combination We present a case of a 40-year-old man with decompensated alcoholic liver cirrhosis presenting with atraumatic cellulitis of one extremity and severe sepsis that rapidly progressed to compartment syndrome despite broad-spectrum antibiotics. Local cultures following debridement revealed Vibrio vulnificus, and subsequent history revealed consumption of raw oysters 48 h before presentation. Our case points out (...) the unique susceptibility of those with cirrhosis and elevated iron saturation to Vibrio septicaemia, as well as the rapidity and severity of the disease progression. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

2016 BMJ case reports

6. Cellulitis (Overview)

, or abscess is most likely caused by streptococci; Staphylococcus aureus, often community-acquired MRSA, is the most likely pathogen when these factors are present [ ] Violaceous color and bullae suggest more serious or systemic infection with organisms such as Vibrio vulnificus or Streptococcus pneumoniae The following findings suggest severe infection: Malaise, chills, fever, and toxicity Lymphangitic spread (red lines streaking away from the area of infection) Circumferential cellulitis Pain (...) [ ] : Capnocytophaga canimorsus (dog) Eikenella corrodens (human) Pasteurella multocida (dog or cat) Streptobacillus moniliformis (rat) Puncture wounds, especially through the bottom of athletic shoes, may cause Pseudomonas osteomyelitis and/or cellulitis. However, lacerations and puncture wounds sustained in an aquatic environment (eg, oceans, lakes, streams) may be contaminated with bacteria not typically found in land-based injuries, including Aeromonas hydrophila , Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas species, Vibrio

2014 eMedicine.com

7. Cellulitis (Overview)

, or abscess is most likely caused by streptococci; Staphylococcus aureus, often community-acquired MRSA, is the most likely pathogen when these factors are present [ ] Violaceous color and bullae suggest more serious or systemic infection with organisms such as Vibrio vulnificus or Streptococcus pneumoniae The following findings suggest severe infection: Malaise, chills, fever, and toxicity Lymphangitic spread (red lines streaking away from the area of infection) Circumferential cellulitis Pain (...) [ ] : Capnocytophaga canimorsus (dog) Eikenella corrodens (human) Pasteurella multocida (dog or cat) Streptobacillus moniliformis (rat) Puncture wounds, especially through the bottom of athletic shoes, may cause Pseudomonas osteomyelitis and/or cellulitis. However, lacerations and puncture wounds sustained in an aquatic environment (eg, oceans, lakes, streams) may be contaminated with bacteria not typically found in land-based injuries, including Aeromonas hydrophila , Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas species, Vibrio

2014 eMedicine.com

8. Cellulitis (Treatment)

in the aquatic environment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg . Jul-Aug 2005. 13(4):243-53. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006. Clin Infect Dis . Apr 1 2008. 46(7):970-6. McNamara DR, Tleyjeh IM, Berbari EF, et al. Incidence of lower-extremity cellulitis: a population-based study in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mayo Clin Proc . Jul 2007. 82(7):817-21. Ellis Simonsen SM, van Orman ER, Hatch BE, et al. Cellulitis (...) , Kentos A. Impact of infectious diseases specialists and microbiological data on the appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis . Jul 1999. 29(1):60-6; discussion 67-8. Chuang YC, Yuan CY, Liu CY, Lan CK, Huang AH. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Taiwan: report of 28 cases and review of clinical manifestations and treatment. Clin Infect Dis . Aug 1992. 15(2):271-6. Fernandez JM, Serrano M, De Arriba JJ, Sanchez MV, Escribano E, Ferreras P. Bacteremic cellulitis caused

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Cellulitis (Treatment)

in the aquatic environment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg . Jul-Aug 2005. 13(4):243-53. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006. Clin Infect Dis . Apr 1 2008. 46(7):970-6. McNamara DR, Tleyjeh IM, Berbari EF, et al. Incidence of lower-extremity cellulitis: a population-based study in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mayo Clin Proc . Jul 2007. 82(7):817-21. Ellis Simonsen SM, van Orman ER, Hatch BE, et al. Cellulitis (...) , Kentos A. Impact of infectious diseases specialists and microbiological data on the appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis . Jul 1999. 29(1):60-6; discussion 67-8. Chuang YC, Yuan CY, Liu CY, Lan CK, Huang AH. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Taiwan: report of 28 cases and review of clinical manifestations and treatment. Clin Infect Dis . Aug 1992. 15(2):271-6. Fernandez JM, Serrano M, De Arriba JJ, Sanchez MV, Escribano E, Ferreras P. Bacteremic cellulitis caused

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Cellulitis (Follow-up)

in the aquatic environment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg . Jul-Aug 2005. 13(4):243-53. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006. Clin Infect Dis . Apr 1 2008. 46(7):970-6. McNamara DR, Tleyjeh IM, Berbari EF, et al. Incidence of lower-extremity cellulitis: a population-based study in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mayo Clin Proc . Jul 2007. 82(7):817-21. Ellis Simonsen SM, van Orman ER, Hatch BE, et al. Cellulitis (...) , Kentos A. Impact of infectious diseases specialists and microbiological data on the appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis . Jul 1999. 29(1):60-6; discussion 67-8. Chuang YC, Yuan CY, Liu CY, Lan CK, Huang AH. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Taiwan: report of 28 cases and review of clinical manifestations and treatment. Clin Infect Dis . Aug 1992. 15(2):271-6. Fernandez JM, Serrano M, De Arriba JJ, Sanchez MV, Escribano E, Ferreras P. Bacteremic cellulitis caused

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Cellulitis (Follow-up)

in the aquatic environment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg . Jul-Aug 2005. 13(4):243-53. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006. Clin Infect Dis . Apr 1 2008. 46(7):970-6. McNamara DR, Tleyjeh IM, Berbari EF, et al. Incidence of lower-extremity cellulitis: a population-based study in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mayo Clin Proc . Jul 2007. 82(7):817-21. Ellis Simonsen SM, van Orman ER, Hatch BE, et al. Cellulitis (...) , Kentos A. Impact of infectious diseases specialists and microbiological data on the appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis . Jul 1999. 29(1):60-6; discussion 67-8. Chuang YC, Yuan CY, Liu CY, Lan CK, Huang AH. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Taiwan: report of 28 cases and review of clinical manifestations and treatment. Clin Infect Dis . Aug 1992. 15(2):271-6. Fernandez JM, Serrano M, De Arriba JJ, Sanchez MV, Escribano E, Ferreras P. Bacteremic cellulitis caused

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Cellulitis (Diagnosis)

, or abscess is most likely caused by streptococci; Staphylococcus aureus, often community-acquired MRSA, is the most likely pathogen when these factors are present [ ] Violaceous color and bullae suggest more serious or systemic infection with organisms such as Vibrio vulnificus or Streptococcus pneumoniae The following findings suggest severe infection: Malaise, chills, fever, and toxicity Lymphangitic spread (red lines streaking away from the area of infection) Circumferential cellulitis Pain (...) [ ] : Capnocytophaga canimorsus (dog) Eikenella corrodens (human) Pasteurella multocida (dog or cat) Streptobacillus moniliformis (rat) Puncture wounds, especially through the bottom of athletic shoes, may cause Pseudomonas osteomyelitis and/or cellulitis. However, lacerations and puncture wounds sustained in an aquatic environment (eg, oceans, lakes, streams) may be contaminated with bacteria not typically found in land-based injuries, including Aeromonas hydrophila , Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas species, Vibrio

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Cellulitis (Diagnosis)

, or abscess is most likely caused by streptococci; Staphylococcus aureus, often community-acquired MRSA, is the most likely pathogen when these factors are present [ ] Violaceous color and bullae suggest more serious or systemic infection with organisms such as Vibrio vulnificus or Streptococcus pneumoniae The following findings suggest severe infection: Malaise, chills, fever, and toxicity Lymphangitic spread (red lines streaking away from the area of infection) Circumferential cellulitis Pain (...) [ ] : Capnocytophaga canimorsus (dog) Eikenella corrodens (human) Pasteurella multocida (dog or cat) Streptobacillus moniliformis (rat) Puncture wounds, especially through the bottom of athletic shoes, may cause Pseudomonas osteomyelitis and/or cellulitis. However, lacerations and puncture wounds sustained in an aquatic environment (eg, oceans, lakes, streams) may be contaminated with bacteria not typically found in land-based injuries, including Aeromonas hydrophila , Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas species, Vibrio

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Cellulitis (Diagnosis)

, or abscess is most likely caused by streptococci; Staphylococcus aureus, often community-acquired MRSA, is the most likely pathogen when these factors are present [ ] Violaceous color and bullae suggest more serious or systemic infection with organisms such as Vibrio vulnificus or Streptococcus pneumoniae The following findings suggest severe infection: Malaise, chills, fever, and toxicity Lymphangitic spread (red lines streaking away from the area of infection) Circumferential cellulitis Pain (...) [ ] : Capnocytophaga canimorsus (dog) Eikenella corrodens (human) Pasteurella multocida (dog or cat) Streptobacillus moniliformis (rat) Puncture wounds, especially through the bottom of athletic shoes, may cause Pseudomonas osteomyelitis and/or cellulitis. However, lacerations and puncture wounds sustained in an aquatic environment (eg, oceans, lakes, streams) may be contaminated with bacteria not typically found in land-based injuries, including Aeromonas hydrophila , Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas species, Vibrio

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

15. Cellulitis (Follow-up)

in the aquatic environment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg . Jul-Aug 2005. 13(4):243-53. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006. Clin Infect Dis . Apr 1 2008. 46(7):970-6. McNamara DR, Tleyjeh IM, Berbari EF, et al. Incidence of lower-extremity cellulitis: a population-based study in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mayo Clin Proc . Jul 2007. 82(7):817-21. Ellis Simonsen SM, van Orman ER, Hatch BE, et al. Cellulitis (...) , Kentos A. Impact of infectious diseases specialists and microbiological data on the appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis . Jul 1999. 29(1):60-6; discussion 67-8. Chuang YC, Yuan CY, Liu CY, Lan CK, Huang AH. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Taiwan: report of 28 cases and review of clinical manifestations and treatment. Clin Infect Dis . Aug 1992. 15(2):271-6. Fernandez JM, Serrano M, De Arriba JJ, Sanchez MV, Escribano E, Ferreras P. Bacteremic cellulitis caused

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

16. Cellulitis (Treatment)

in the aquatic environment. J Am Acad Orthop Surg . Jul-Aug 2005. 13(4):243-53. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006. Clin Infect Dis . Apr 1 2008. 46(7):970-6. McNamara DR, Tleyjeh IM, Berbari EF, et al. Incidence of lower-extremity cellulitis: a population-based study in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mayo Clin Proc . Jul 2007. 82(7):817-21. Ellis Simonsen SM, van Orman ER, Hatch BE, et al. Cellulitis (...) , Kentos A. Impact of infectious diseases specialists and microbiological data on the appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis . Jul 1999. 29(1):60-6; discussion 67-8. Chuang YC, Yuan CY, Liu CY, Lan CK, Huang AH. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Taiwan: report of 28 cases and review of clinical manifestations and treatment. Clin Infect Dis . Aug 1992. 15(2):271-6. Fernandez JM, Serrano M, De Arriba JJ, Sanchez MV, Escribano E, Ferreras P. Bacteremic cellulitis caused

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

17. Cellulitis (Overview)

, or abscess is most likely caused by streptococci; Staphylococcus aureus, often community-acquired MRSA, is the most likely pathogen when these factors are present [ ] Violaceous color and bullae suggest more serious or systemic infection with organisms such as Vibrio vulnificus or Streptococcus pneumoniae The following findings suggest severe infection: Malaise, chills, fever, and toxicity Lymphangitic spread (red lines streaking away from the area of infection) Circumferential cellulitis Pain (...) [ ] : Capnocytophaga canimorsus (dog) Eikenella corrodens (human) Pasteurella multocida (dog or cat) Streptobacillus moniliformis (rat) Puncture wounds, especially through the bottom of athletic shoes, may cause Pseudomonas osteomyelitis and/or cellulitis. However, lacerations and puncture wounds sustained in an aquatic environment (eg, oceans, lakes, streams) may be contaminated with bacteria not typically found in land-based injuries, including Aeromonas hydrophila , Pseudomonas and Plesiomonas species, Vibrio

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

18. Vibrio Infections (Overview)

with Vibrio infections die because of the high mortality rate (35-50%) associated with V vulnificus septicemia. Among all foodborne diseases, V vulnificus infection is associated with the highest case fatality rate (39%). Patients with who consumed raw oysters were 80 times more likely to develop V vulnificus infection and 200 times more likely to die of the infection than those without liver disease who consumed raw oysters. [ ] A 2017 case study reported V vulnificus cellulitis in a patient (...) Vibrio Infections (Overview) Vibrio Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjMyMDM4LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Vibrio Infections Updated: Jul 24, 2018

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Vibrio Infections (Diagnosis)

with Vibrio infections die because of the high mortality rate (35-50%) associated with V vulnificus septicemia. Among all foodborne diseases, V vulnificus infection is associated with the highest case fatality rate (39%). Patients with who consumed raw oysters were 80 times more likely to develop V vulnificus infection and 200 times more likely to die of the infection than those without liver disease who consumed raw oysters. [ ] A 2017 case study reported V vulnificus cellulitis in a patient (...) Vibrio Infections (Diagnosis) Vibrio Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjMyMDM4LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Vibrio Infections Updated: Jul 24, 2018

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Bullous cellulitis in cirrhotic patients - a rare but life-threatening infection caused by non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae bacteraemia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bullous cellulitis in cirrhotic patients - a rare but life-threatening infection caused by non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae bacteraemia. 21292862 2011 07 25 2011 05 18 1473-5644 60 Pt 6 2011 Jun Journal of medical microbiology J. Med. Microbiol. Bullous cellulitis in cirrhotic patients--a rare but life-threatening infection caused by non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae bacteraemia. 861-2 10.1099/jmm.0.024497-0 Yang Chih-Jen CJ Wang Chuan-Sheng CS Lu Po-Liang PL Chen Tun-Chieh TC Chen Yen-Hsu YH (...) Huang Ming-Shyan MS Lin Chun-Chu CC Hwang Jhi-Jhu JJ eng Letter 2011 02 03 England J Med Microbiol 0224131 0022-2615 IM Bacteremia diagnosis microbiology pathology Cellulitis microbiology pathology Female Humans Liver Cirrhosis complications Male Vibrio Infections diagnosis microbiology pathology Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolation & purification 2011 2 5 6 0 2011 2 5 6 0 2011 7 26 6 0 ppublish 21292862 jmm.0.024497-0 10.1099/jmm.0.024497-0

2011 Journal of Medical Microbiology

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>