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Umbilical Vein Catheter

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1. Umbilical Vein Needle Catheterization for Endotracheal Intubation.

Umbilical Vein Needle Catheterization for Endotracheal Intubation. Umbilical Vein Needle Catheterization for Endotracheal Intubation. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Umbilical Vein Needle (...) : Retrospective Official Title: Umbilical Vein Needle Catheterization for Endotracheal Intubation. Actual Study Start Date : November 1, 2016 Actual Primary Completion Date : May 1, 2017 Actual Study Completion Date : May 1, 2017 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine resources: Groups and Cohorts Go to Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment Preterm infants intubated All participants were preterm infants intubated in the delivery room for Infantile Respiratory Distress Syndrome (IRDS

2017 Clinical Trials

2. Umbilical Vein Catheter

Catheter Aka: Umbilical Vein Catheter , Catheterization of Umbilical Vein II. Background Umbilical Vein Catheterization functions as a in newborns Umbilical vein remains patent for the first week of life (easiest to place the nearer to delivery) Catheter enters umbilical vein and ultimately enters ductus venosus (near liver) and inferior vena cava III. Indications: Emergent access to newborn circulation Acute stabilization Very ill infants (e.g. ) Very low birth weight (<750g) IV. Contraindications (...) with accidentally cannulating an umbilical artery, which will track inferiorly Secure line with and tape VII. Technique: Removal Purse string around vein Remove catheter VIII. Complications Misplaced catheter (most common) Portal venous system Superior mesenteric vein Left atrium (via foramen ovale) Other complications Air embolism into Arrhythmia False lumen IX. References Civitarese and Crane (2016) Crit Dec Emerg Med 30(1): 14-23 Robertson and Shilkofski (2005) Harriet Lane, Mosby, p. 81-6 Images: Related

2018 FP Notebook

3. Umbilical catheters as vectors for generalized bacterial infection in premature infants regardless of antibiotic use. (Abstract)

Umbilical catheters as vectors for generalized bacterial infection in premature infants regardless of antibiotic use. Introduction. Umbilical catheterization offers unique vascular access that is only possible in the neonatal setting due to unobstructed umbilical vessels from foetal circulation. With the cut of the umbilical cord, two arteries and a vein are dissected, allowing quick and painless catheterization of the neonate. Unfortunately, keeping the umbilical access sterile is challenging (...) due to its mobility and necrosis of the umbilical stump, which makes it a perfect model for vessel catheter colonization analysis.Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial colonization of the umbilical catheter, with a focus on the difference between various sections of the catheter, the duration of catheterization, patient status and gestational age.Methodology. We performed bacterial cultures for 44 umbilical catheters, analysing the superficial and deep parts of the catheter

2019 Journal of Medical Microbiology

4. Comparison of JSS Formula with Modified Shukla's Formula for Insertion of Umbilical Venous Catheter: A Randomized Controlled Study. (Abstract)

Comparison of JSS Formula with Modified Shukla's Formula for Insertion of Umbilical Venous Catheter: A Randomized Controlled Study. To compare the rate of optimal position of UVC between modified Shukla's formula and JSS formula.Babies requiring umbilical vein catheterization were randomized to either Shukla or JSS formula group. Post-procedure X-ray was taken to check the tip position. Tip of the UVC just above the diaphragm (T9 - T10) was considered optimal. Success rate in achieving optimal (...) position between the two groups were compared.Out of 104 babies recruited, 50 were randomized for Shukla's formula and 54 for JSS formula. Catheter tips were in acceptable positions in 39.6% of Shukla group as compared to 56% in JSS group (P=0.02).The JSS Formula resulted in more optimal placement of UVC than the modified Shukla formula.

2019 Indian pediatrics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

5. Estimating Insertion Length of Umbilical Catheters in Newborn Infants

: Cardiff and Vale University Health Board Collaborator: Cardiff University Information provided by (Responsible Party): Mallinath Chakraborty, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Insertion Length of Umbilical Catheters Umbilical catheters, inserted through the umbilical artery and vein of newborn babies at birth, are crucial in neonatal care of sick babies. They allow delivery of medication and fluids and to provide access for blood sampling (...) with other clinical information to develop a more reliable formula for estimating the insertion length of umbilical venous and arterial catheters to an appropriate length. Our study population will include newborn babies admitted to the neonatal unit requiring umbilical venous (UVC) and/or arterial catheterisation (UAC) over a two-year period. Demographic information will be recorded for each child and once position has been confirmed, the new external length will be measured. New formulae for estimating

2018 Clinical Trials

6. Ex Situ Machine Perfusion of Human Donor Livers via the Surgically Reopened Umbilical Vein: A Proof of Concept. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ex Situ Machine Perfusion of Human Donor Livers via the Surgically Reopened Umbilical Vein: A Proof of Concept. Machine perfusion of donor livers is typically performed via the portal vein main stem. Instead, cannulation of a reopened umbilical vein could allow machine perfusion during organ procurement and subsequent implantation in the recipient without interruption of the portal venous circulation. We aimed to assess the feasibility of portal venous machine perfusion via the umbilical (...) vein.During back table inspection of five human livers declined for transplantation, the umbilical vein was surgically reopened, dilated and cannulated. Hypothermic and normothermic oxygenated machine perfusion (NMP) were performed using the umbilical vein for portal inflow. Three livers were perfused with hypothermic machine perfusion, one full liver graft underwent NMP for four hours, and one left lateral split procedure was performed under continuous NMP with portal perfusion via the umbilical vein.In

2019 Transplantation

7. Comparison of methods and formulas used in umbilical venous catheter placement Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of methods and formulas used in umbilical venous catheter placement Central venous access is frequently provided by way of umbilical venous catheter placement in critically ill newborns. This study compared the methods of Dunn, Shukla-Ferrara, and Revised Shukla-Ferrara in determining the appropriate insertion length of umbilical vein catheters.This prospective observational study was carried out in 121 newborns with umbilical venous catheter, group 1 (n=41) used Dunn method, group 2 (...) (n=40) used the Shukla-Ferrara formula, and group 3 used revised Shukla-Ferrara formula (n=40). Catheter tip position was evaluated with an anterior-posterior chest radiograph after insertion of the umbilical venous catheter. The ideal position for the umbilical venous catheter was defined as the catheter tip being visible between the 9th and 10th thoracic vertebrae on an anterior-posterior chest radiograph. The position of the umbilical venous catheter was considered too high if the tip

2017 Turkish Archives of Pediatrics/Türk Pediatri Arşivi

8. Islet Transplantation Through an Indwelling Catheter in the Umbilical Vein

approach via portal vein of liver has various defects. Percutaneous trans-hepatic puncture is risk of possible severe hemorrhage and portal thrombosis. The laparoscopic entry techniques require longer surgical duration and have an increased rate of catheterization failure. Moreover, the catheters were not allowed to indwell for subsequent infusions. In the current study, the investigators aim to performed open surgery, catheterized the umbilical vein and infused islets into the portal vein (...) . The catheter was indwelled for one month after surgery. Therapeutic effects, surgical parameters and complications were observed to evaluate feasibility and safety. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Procedure: umbilical vein catheterization Phase 1 Phase 2 Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 12 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary

2015 Clinical Trials

9. Use of Central Venous Catheters in Neonates - a Framework for Practice

umbilical catheters in low positions especially in the context of hypertonic solutions and vasoactive drugs has to be risk assessed carefully. Outside of emergency use replacing the UVC or alternative access through a percutaneous catheter need to be considered carefully as alternative options. Ascending lumbar vein (ALV) malposition is a relatively common complication of lower-limb placed PICCs but may often go unrecognised [14]. Practitioners inserting CVCs should be familiar with the specific (...) and identification of inadvertent lumbar vein catheterisation in the NICU. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2015;100:F277-8. 15. Berger TM, Fontana M. Horizontal beam technique to document position of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2016;101:F89. 16. Reece A, Ubhi T, Craig AR, et al. Positioning long lines: contrast versus plain radiography. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2001;84:F129-30. 17. Resuscitation Council (UK). Newborn Life Support – Resuscitation

2018 British Association of Perinatal Medicine

10. Use of Central Venous Catheters in Neonates

umbilical catheters in low positions especially in the context of hypertonic solutions and vasoactive drugs has to be risk assessed carefully. Outside of emergency use replacing the UVC or alternative access through a percutaneous catheter need to be considered carefully as alternative options. Ascending lumbar vein (ALV) malposition is a relatively common complication of lower-limb placed PICCs but may often go unrecognised [14]. Practitioners inserting CVCs should be familiar with the specific (...) and identification of inadvertent lumbar vein catheterisation in the NICU. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2015;100:F277-8. 15. Berger TM, Fontana M. Horizontal beam technique to document position of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2016;101:F89. 16. Reece A, Ubhi T, Craig AR, et al. Positioning long lines: contrast versus plain radiography. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2001;84:F129-30. 17. Resuscitation Council (UK). Newborn Life Support – Resuscitation

2018 British Association of Perinatal Medicine

12. Supraclavicular Approach to Ultrasound-Guided Brachiocephalic Vein Cannulation in Children and Neonates Full Text available with Trip Pro

Supraclavicular Approach to Ultrasound-Guided Brachiocephalic Vein Cannulation in Children and Neonates The correct choice of intra vascular access in critically ill neonates should be individualized depending on the type and duration of therapy, gestational and chronological age, weight and/or size, diagnosis, clinical status, and venous system patency. Accordingly, there is an ongoing demand for optimization of catheterization. Recently, the use of ultrasound (US)-guided cannulation (...) technique for SCV and BCV cannulation based on our experience in a large NICU setting. Although the cannulation the SCV or BCV does not substitute the use of peripherally inserted central catheters or umbilical venous central catheters in neonates, it is a feasible route in very small children who are in need of a large caliber central venous access.

2017 Frontiers in pediatrics

13. Ultrasound-Guided Subclavian Vein Cannulation in Low Birth Weight Neonates. (Abstract)

Ultrasound-Guided Subclavian Vein Cannulation in Low Birth Weight Neonates. Central venous access in critically ill, small infants remains technically challenging even in experienced hands. Several vascular accesses exist, but the subclavian vein is often preferred for central venous catheter insertion in infants where abdominal malformation and/or closure of the vein preclude the use of umbilical venous catheters, as catheterization of the subclavian vein is easier in very short necks than (...) supraclavicular approach was applied on all infants who had an subclavian vein catheterization during a 30-month period from January 2013 to July 2015.One hundred seven supraclavicular subclavian vein catheters were placed in 105 children weighing less than 5,000 g. Among those, 40 patients weighed less than 2,500 g and 10 patients weighed less than 1,500 g. Successful central venous catheter insertion, defined as the correct placement of a functional double-lumen catheter (3F or 4F), was obtained in 97.3

2017 Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

14. Catheterization, Umbilical Vein

Catheterization Updated: Mar 26, 2018 Author: John P Magnan, MD, MS; Chief Editor: Vincent Lopez Rowe, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Umbilical Vein Catheterization Overview Background Umbilical vein catheterization may be a life-saving procedure in neonates who require vascular access and resuscitation. The umbilical vein remains patent and viable for cannulation until approximately 1 week after birth. After proper placement of the umbilical line, intravenous (IV) fluids and medication (...) resuscitation. Alternative uses of the umbilical vein may include exchange transfusions and . [ ] Previous Next: Contraindications Absolute contraindications for umbilical vein catheterization include the following: Previous References Butler-O'Hara M, Buzzard CJ, Reubens L, McDermott MP, DiGrazio W, D'Angio CT. A randomized trial comparing long-term and short-term use of umbilical venous catheters in premature infants with birth weights of less than 1251 grams. Pediatrics . 2006 Jul. 118(1):e25-35. . Murki

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Umbilical Venous Catheter Insertion Depth in Neonates

, University of Calgary ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Other Study ID Numbers: 16-1303 First Posted: October 20, 2016 Last Update Posted: May 2, 2018 Last Verified: May 2018 Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement: Plan to Share IPD: Undecided Keywords provided by Amuchou Soraisham, University of Calgary: Catheter Umbilical vein Neonate (...) Umbilical Venous Catheter Insertion Depth in Neonates Umbilical Venous Catheter Insertion Depth in Neonates - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Umbilical Venous Catheter Insertion Depth

2016 Clinical Trials

16. Focal portal vein stenosis in an adolescent potentially related to complicated umbilical catheter insertion in the neonatal period Full Text available with Trip Pro

Focal portal vein stenosis in an adolescent potentially related to complicated umbilical catheter insertion in the neonatal period A 14-year-old girl, with no medical history except for a preterm birth at 7 months, presented with clinical and laboratory signs of pancytopenia. Radiological investigation, including abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a focal irregular main portal vein wall and splenomegaly. Endoscopy showed major esophageal and gastric varices. Definitive (...) diagnosis was made by direct, transhepatic portography revealing a focal stenosis associated with a dissection of the main portal vein. Percutaneous treatment including balloon angioplasty and stent placement resulted in complete re-expansion of the portal vein main branch. Clinical and radiological follow-up over 5 years showed complete disappearance of all clinical signs and normalization of laboratory data and splenic volume.

2013 Acta Radiologica Short Reports

17. Broken Umbilical Vein Catheter as an Embolus in a Neonate- An Unusual Preventable Complication Full Text available with Trip Pro

Broken Umbilical Vein Catheter as an Embolus in a Neonate- An Unusual Preventable Complication Umbilical vein catheter (UVC) is used in managing critically sick neonates all over the world. It is generally considered to be safe although various complications can arise and are well known. Herein we describe a successful retrieval of a broken and migrated UVC across the heart in a neonate. Pertinent literature regarding rarity of its occurrence and mechanism of occurrence has been touched upon

2013 Journal of Neonatal Surgery

18. Splenic Vein Thrombosis with Oesophageal Varices: A Late Complication of Umbilical Vein Catheterization Full Text available with Trip Pro

Splenic Vein Thrombosis with Oesophageal Varices: A Late Complication of Umbilical Vein Catheterization On the basis of observations made on three infants, a description is given of a late complication of umbilical vein catheterization not hitherto reported. The children showed the symptoms of thrombosis of the splenic vein with secondary splenomegaly and marked gastric and/or esophageal varices, while the portal vein showed no abnormality. The diagnosis was preoperatively established by means

1974 Annals of Surgery

19. Umbilical Vein Catheter

Catheter Aka: Umbilical Vein Catheter , Catheterization of Umbilical Vein II. Background Umbilical Vein Catheterization functions as a in newborns Umbilical vein remains patent for the first week of life (easiest to place the nearer to delivery) Catheter enters umbilical vein and ultimately enters ductus venosus (near liver) and inferior vena cava III. Indications: Emergent access to newborn circulation Acute stabilization Very ill infants (e.g. ) Very low birth weight (<750g) IV. Contraindications (...) with accidentally cannulating an umbilical artery, which will track inferiorly Secure line with and tape VII. Technique: Removal Purse string around vein Remove catheter VIII. Complications Misplaced catheter (most common) Portal venous system Superior mesenteric vein Left atrium (via foramen ovale) Other complications Air embolism into Arrhythmia False lumen IX. References Civitarese and Crane (2016) Crit Dec Emerg Med 30(1): 14-23 Robertson and Shilkofski (2005) Harriet Lane, Mosby, p. 81-6 Images: Related

2015 FP Notebook

20. Inpatient Diagnosis and Treatment of Central Vascular Catheter (CVC) Infections

that do not meet the CLABSI definition (see definitions, page 2). If additional clinical processes are being considered, other treatment guidelines may supersede this guideline (e.g. if a patient presents with fever and neutropenia, please refer to Fever and Neutropenia treatment guidelines). Excluded from the scope of the guideline: ? Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) catheters ? Umbilical catheters ? Peripheral catheters, such as midline catheters, peripheral venous or peripheral arterial (...) =opinion of expert panel. 2 Michigan Medicine Management of Central Vascular Catheter Infections December 2016 Definitions Device Definitions Central vascular catheter: A catheter placed within a vein or artery whose distal end is intended to be located within a central vein or artery, usually the vena cava (inferior or superior). This includes peripherally inserted central catheters, tunneled and non-tunneled central venous catheters, central and pulmonary arterial catheters, and subcutaneous ports

2016 University of Michigan Health System

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