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Trendelenburgs Symptom

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1. Trendelenburg's Symptom

Trendelenburg's Symptom Trendelenburgs Symptom Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Trendelenburg's Symptom Trendelenburg's (...) Symptom Aka: Trendelenburg's Symptom , Trendelenburg Gait , Trandelenburg Test , Modified Trandelenburg Test II. Indication evaluation Performed in infants and children who are walking Identify hip abductor weakness (especially gluteus medius) Intrinsic pathology may also cause Trandelenburg III. Exam: Modified Trandelenburg Test (Standing) Technique Patient stands on affected leg and lifts the unaffected leg from floor Interpretation: Positive Test (iliac crest) drops down on side of lifted leg

2018 FP Notebook

2. Incidence of Postoperative Delirium in Cancer Patients After Laparoscopic Surgery in Trendelenburg Position

Incidence of Postoperative Delirium in Cancer Patients After Laparoscopic Surgery in Trendelenburg Position Incidence of Postoperative Delirium in Cancer Patients After Laparoscopic Surgery in Trendelenburg Position - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Incidence of Postoperative Delirium in Cancer Patients After Laparoscopic Surgery in Trendelenburg Position The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

2018 Clinical Trials

3. Reverse Trendelenburg Positioning and Its Effect on Outcomes: a Retrospective Study of Consecutive Patients

) Sharing Statement: Plan to Share IPD: No Keywords provided by C. Michael Dunham, Mercy Health Ohio: Hypoxemia Reverse Trendelenburg Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Hypoxia Respiratory Aspiration Signs and Symptoms, Respiratory Signs and Symptoms Respiration Disorders Respiratory Tract Diseases Pathologic Processes Anesthetics Central Nervous System Depressants Physiological Effects of Drugs (...) Reverse Trendelenburg Positioning and Its Effect on Outcomes: a Retrospective Study of Consecutive Patients Reverse Trendelenburg Positioning and Its Effect on Outcomes: a Retrospective Study of Consecutive Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies

2016 Clinical Trials

4. Trendelenburg's Symptom

Trendelenburg's Symptom Trendelenburgs Symptom Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Trendelenburg's Symptom Trendelenburg's (...) Symptom Aka: Trendelenburg's Symptom , Trendelenburg Gait , Trandelenburg Test , Modified Trandelenburg Test II. Indication evaluation Performed in infants and children who are walking Identify hip abductor weakness (especially gluteus medius) Intrinsic pathology may also cause Trandelenburg III. Exam: Modified Trandelenburg Test (Standing) Technique Patient stands on affected leg and lifts the unaffected leg from floor Interpretation: Positive Test (iliac crest) drops down on side of lifted leg

2015 FP Notebook

5. The use of the trendelenburg position in the surgical treatment of extreme cerebellar slump. (PubMed)

to facilitate ascent of the cerebellum. After almost complete dissolution of neurologic symptoms, surgical reconstruction was performed by tonsillar resection and the creation of a new structural support using a bone graft.Both patients experienced good clinical and morphological outcomes immediately after surgery, and for two years thereafter.Neurological symptoms related to cerebellar or brainstem slump can be adequately reversed by placing the patient in the Trendelenburg position. After uneventful (...) The use of the trendelenburg position in the surgical treatment of extreme cerebellar slump. State-of-the-art treatment for Chiari Malformation I (CM-I) consists of decompression by posterior fossa craniectomy. A rare but severe complication that develops over months to years after this procedure is cerebellar slump. Treatment options for this condition are limited. We present a new and promising approach to treat this rare condition.The patients were placed in the Trendelenburg position

2015 British Journal of Neurosurgery

6. Legg-Calvé-Perthes' disease

Legg-Calvé-Perthes' disease Legg-Calvé-Perthes' disease - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Legg-Calvé-Perthes' disease Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Patients commonly have a characteristic phenotype of short stature, delayed bone age, and hyperactivity. Although several aetiologies have been proposed, a multi-factorial involvement is most likely. Typically unilateral (...) and is more commonly seen in boys. The cause is hypothesised to be single or multiple vascular events, followed by re-vascularisation. In later life, it can lead to a painful and poorly functioning hip. The disease was first described independently by Jacques Calvé, Arthur T. Legg, and Georg Perthes in 1910. History and exam presence of risk factors limp limited range of motion at the hip joint short stature muscle wasting hyperactivity Trendelenburg's sign synovitis knee pain thigh pain groin/buttock

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

Klein line will intersect the epiphysis. An abnormal Klein line does not intersect the epiphysis, as the femoral neck has moved proximally and anteriorly relative to the epiphysis Image courtesy of John M. Flynn, MD [Citation ends]. History and exam presence of risk factors weight (>90th percentile) gait with affected leg externally rotated groin or knee pain bilateral hip pain Trendelenburg's gait restricted range of motion weight (<50th percentile) symptoms of hypothyroidism or panhypopituitarism (...) Slipped capital femoral epiphysis Slipped capital femoral epiphysis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Slipped capital femoral epiphysis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: April 2018 Summary May present with an acute/insidious onset of pain and limp. The disorder is typically seen in the adolescent age group. Associated systemic disease is a common feature. Obligatory external rotation on hip

2018 BMJ Best Practice

8. Groin pain

Groin pain Groin pain - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Groin pain Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary A very common injury resulting from physical activity, including sport. Most common is adductor-related, iliopsoas-related, inguinal-related, and hip-joint-related groin pain. Most common presentation for intra-articular pathology of the hip joint; however, referred pain from (...) other sources is not uncommon. Signs and symptoms typically include activity-related pain, pain with movement of the hip, and antalgic gait. The first-line diagnostic test for most conditions is a set of standard x-rays. More advanced imaging modalities, such as ultrasound and MRI, should be used with discretion when clinically indicated. Establishing the correct diagnosis is the first step to instituting appropriate treatment. Treatment may vary widely depending on the disease entity present

2018 BMJ Best Practice

9. ACR–ASNR–SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Myelography and Cisternography

but not limited to: 1. Demonstration of the site of a cerebrospinal fluid leak (postlumbar puncture headache, postspinal surgery headache, orthostatic headache, rhinorrhea or otorrhea). 2. Symptoms or signs of spontaneous intracranial hypotension [1-5]. 3. Surgical planning, especially in regard to the nerve roots. 4. Evaluation of the bony and soft tissue components of spinal degenerative changes [1,6,7]. 5. Radiation therapy planning. 6. Diagnostic evaluation of spinal or basal cisternal disease. 7 (...) performance and interpretation. Documentation that satisfies medical necessity includes 1) signs and symptoms and/or 2) relevant history (including known diagnoses). Additional information regarding the specific reason for the examination or a provisional diagnosis would be helpful and may at times be needed to allow for the proper performance and interpretation of the examination. The request for the examination must be originated by a physician or other appropriately licensed health care provider

2019 American Society of Neuroradiology

11. CRACKCast E143 – Diving Injuries and Dysbarism

with DCS and AGE. Rosen’s in Perspective Diving has a fascinating history, which we don’t have time to go into, so check it out in Rosen’s. But the traditional term “the bends” originated from workers building the Brooklyn Bridge – developing symptoms from nitrogen gas coming out of solution due to rapid ascent out of deep sea working conditions. Since the invention of SCUBA (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus’) gear people are able to use compressed air or gas mixes to dive even deeper (...) of small bubbles of nitrogen gas in the blood and tissues on ASCENT! LOCATION, location, location of the bubbles – determines the type of symptoms that arise Fetal circulation anatomy explains why pregnant women should not dive. Multiple small bubbles normally occur on ascent, but if they become persistent, large or too numerous for the lungs to filter → inflammatory cascades ensue, cytokines, thrombosis, ischemia, obstruction etc. can occur. These bubbles can cause ischemia and hypoxia if large

2018 CandiEM

12. Acutely Limping Child Up To Age 5

sedimentation rate, or elevated C- reactive protein suggests infection. Localization of pathology is based on site of pain, tenderness, presence of erythema, swelling, and positive physical maneuvers and signs, such as the Trendelenburg test, Galeazzi sign, Patrick/FABER test, pelvic compression test, and psoas sign [7]. A detailed analysis of gait can suggest the diagnosis [6]. The decision-making process about initial imaging must take into account the level of suspicion for infection and whether symptoms (...) Acutely Limping Child Up To Age 5 Revised 2018 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Acutely Limping Child Up To Age 5 American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Acutely Limping Child Up To Age 5 Variant 1: Child up to age 5. Acute limp. Nonlocalized symptoms. No concern for infection. Initial imaging. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level Radiography tibia/fibula Usually Appropriate ? Radiography femur May Be Appropriate ?? Radiography foot May Be Appropriate

2018 American College of Radiology

13. Practice Advisory for the Prevention of Perioperative Peripheral Neuropathies

Peripheral Neuropathies,” adopted by the ASA in 2010 and published in 2011. A brief summary highlighting major differences between the current document and the 2011 Advisory regarding new study findings, evidence, and recommendations may be found in the Update Highlights box. Methodology Definition of Peripheral Neuropathy For this updated Advisory, perioperative peripheral neuropathy refers to postoperative signs and symptoms related to peripheral nerve injury ( e.g. , brachial plexus, sciatic, femoral (...) ). Symptoms may include but are not limited to paresthesias, muscle weakness, tingling, or pain in the extremities. Purposes of the Advisory The purposes of the Advisory are to (1) educate ASA members, (2) provide a reference framework for individual practices, and (3) stimulate the pursuit and evaluation of strategies that may prevent or reduce the frequency of occurrence or minimize the severity of peripheral neuropathies that may be related to perioperative positioning of patients. Focus Prevention

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2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists

14. CRACKCast E180 – Labor & Delivery

are overrepresented in the ED population. While we want to transfer all pregnant women to an obstetric centre, in some situations this is the WRONG decision 1) Describe the difference between false and true labor Whenever a woman in the third trimester shows up to the ER: ask whether this could be labour. A wide array of nonspecific symptoms may herald the onset of labor. Abdominal pain, back pain, cramping, nausea, vomiting, urinary urgency, stress incontinence, and anxiety can be symptoms of labor. After 24 (...) . At this point, reduce the infusion rate to 1 to 2 mL/min. 7) List 8 factors linked to pre-term labor. Describe the management of premature labor in the ED. List 3 tocolytics. Preterm labor is defined as uterine contractions with cervical changes before 37 weeks of gestation. Early maternal signs and symptoms include an increase or change in vaginal discharge, pain resulting from uterine contractions (sometimes perceived as back pain), pelvic pressure, vaginal bleeding, and fluid leak. Box 181.2 – Factors

2018 CandiEM

15. CRACKCast E176 – Pediatric Musculoskeletal Disorders

as asymmetry in the level of the patient’s knees. Skin folds: in the groin, below the buttock, and along the thighs ***can be present of ⅓ of normal hips though! Hip joint range of motion: flexion, abduction (frog leg position) Leg movements Abnormal findings on Barlow and Ortolani maneuvers (less reliable > 4 months of age) Post walking: Asymmetric gait Asymmetric in-toeing or out-toeing Flexion contractures Hyperlordosis Trendelenburg gait [10] List 10 causes of hip pain in children Trauma : hip (...) , pseudoparalysis of the extremity, and pain when being handled . Most older children have systemic signs and symptoms of fever, malaise, poor appetite, and irritability, as well as localized symptoms of pain and refusal to move the affected joint. If the lower part of the body is involved, patients may limp or refuse to walk. The physical examination reveals local erythema, warmth, and swelling . If the hip is affected, it often is held in flexion, abduction, and external rotation. Range of motion is decreased

2018 CandiEM

16. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is the resolution of the symptoms associated with BPPV. Secondary outcomes considered include an increased rate of accurate diagnoses of BPPV, a more efficient return to regular activities and work, decreased use of inappropriate medications and unnecessary diagnostic tests, reduction in recurrence of BPPV, and reduction in adverse events associated with undiagnosed or untreated BPPV. Other outcomes considered include minimizing costs in the diagnosis (...) period of observation or treatment to document resolution or persistence of symptoms; (5) evaluate, or refer to a clinician who can evaluate, patients with persistent symptoms for unresolved BPPV and/or underlying peripheral vestibular or central nervous system disorders; and (6) educate patients regarding the impact of BPPV on their safety, the potential for disease recurrence, and the importance of follow-up. The update group made recommendations against (1) radiographic imaging for a patient who

2017 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

17. Management of Infusion Reactions to Systemic Anticancer Therapy: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines

proteins [generally immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic responses] or non-immune-mediated reactions [1]. Most IRs are mild with symptoms such as chills, fever, nausea, headache, skin rash, pruritus, etc. Severe reactions are less frequent and may be fatal without appropriate intervention. It is dif?cult to evaluate these reactions through prospective randomised studies because of the unexpected nature of these events. There is a lack of consensus in the terminology or grading of the severity (...) the nomenclature of allergy. The World Allergy Organization (WAO) created a Nomenclature Review Committee to review the EAACI Nomenclature Position Statement and to present a glo- bally acceptable nomenclature for allergic diseases [9]. The term ‘hypersensitivity’ should be used to describe objectively reprodu- cible symptoms or signs initiated by exposure to a de?ned stimu- lus at a dose tolerated by normal persons. ‘Allergy’ is a hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) initiated by speci?c immunolo- gical mechanisms

2017 European Society for Medical Oncology

18. CRACKCast E044 – Neck Trauma

are the indications for immediate OR vs CTA in managing penetrating neck trauma? Most injuries have nonspecific signs/symptoms: serial examination is key Presence of soft signs suggests non-vascular injury, but 5-15% may still have a vascular injury Features of decompensation: Dyspnea Dysphonia Stridor Drooling Expanding hematoma Bruit Cerebral ischemia Shock “HARD SIGNS” – very high likelihood of vascular injury Expanding Hematoma Arterial bleed Roaring bruit Neurologic Deficits Stridor Ischemia No radial (...) → should prompt consideration for cervical collar Unstable patients AIRWAY #1 priority! C-spine immobilization – only in the context of blunt trauma or evidence of SCI RSI – is usually*** safe Consider pneumothorax/hemothorax/paralysis in zone I injuries VASCULAR CONCERNS Usually wounds with active bleeding shouldn’t be probed – as it may dislodge a clot AVOID blind clamping of bleeding vessels/structures! Trendelenburg reduces the risk of air embolism Place IV access on the uninjured side CERVICAL

2016 CandiEM

19. Guidelines for Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

, Knoxville, TN The Guthrie Clinic, Sayre, PA Intermountain Healthcare, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Preamble The goals of ventral hernia repair are relief of patient symptoms and/or cure of the hernia with minimization of recurrence rates. While laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) has gained popularity in recent years, there is still significant controversy about the optimal approach to ventral hernia repair (...) is for symptom relief and/or prevention of future problems related to the hernia such as pain, acute incarceration, enlargement, and skin problems. For all hernia repairs it is important to define the goals of the operation preoperatively and align those goals between the patient and the surgeon. It is important to consider the size of the hernia defect when contemplating a laparoscopic approach, as larger defects generally increase the difficulty of the procedure. A recently published guideline

2016 Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

20. Diagnosis of Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Suspected Acute Appendicitis

assessed the strength and applicability of the evidence. Results. Information on the test performance of diagnostic tests was available from 903 studies: clinical symptoms and signs (137 studies), laboratory tests (217 studies), imaging tests (519 studies), multivariable diagnostic scores (127 studies), and diagnostic laparoscopy (55 studies). Trials directly comparing diagnostic tests were too heterogeneous to support definitive conclusions; therefore, most of our results pertain to the test (...) performance of individual tests. Clinical symptoms and signs, and laboratory tests had relatively low sensitivity and specificity when used in isolation. Their combination in multivariable scores performed somewhat better; however, the most studied scores were developed before the widespread use of imaging, thus lessening the applicability of their results to current practice. Computed tomography (CT) had high sensitivity (summary estimates ranging from 0.96 to 1) and specificity (0.91 to 1) in all

2016 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

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