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Travelers Diarrhea

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81. A Pilot Study Assessing Intestinal Microbiota Diversification and Changes After Travel to South(East) Asia From the US

to South or Southeast Asia, regions where rates of travelers' diarrhea and intestinal colonization with antimicrobial resistant bacteria are highest. To measure the diversity change of the intestinal microbiota, participants will complete a questionnaire and provide a stool specimen at three different time points: prior to traveling, two weeks after returning from traveling, and 14 weeks after returning from traveling. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Dysbiosis Other: Screening Criteria (...) Review Other: Pre-Travel Questionnaire Other: Pre-Travel Stool Specimen Collection Other: Short-Term Post-Travel Questionnaire Other: Short-Term Post-Travel Stool Specimen Collection Other: Long-Term Post-Travel Questionnaire Other: Long-Term Post-Travel Stool Specimen Collection Detailed Description: Travelers' diarrhea is the most common illness experienced by those going overseas. Estimates vary, but incidence has been reported to range between 30-60%, depending on travel destination and season

2017 Clinical Trials

82. Colonization Factors in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains in Travelers to Mexico, Guatemala, and India Compared with Children in Houston, Texas. (PubMed)

Colonization Factors in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains in Travelers to Mexico, Guatemala, and India Compared with Children in Houston, Texas. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can be attributed to around 200 million diarrheal episodes and 380,000 deaths in the developing regions. Travelers' diarrhea occurs in 15-40% of travelers to developing regions with ETEC being the most important etiologic agent. This study aims to describe the distribution of enterotoxins and colonization (...) factor (CF) profiles of ETEC isolates from stool samples of adult travelers acquiring diarrhea in Mexico, Guatemala, and India and a group of children with acute diarrhea in Houston, TX, between 2007 and 2012. The heat-labile/heat-stable (LT/ST) enterotoxins and CFs from 252 patients were determined using polymerase chain reaction assay. Among the 252 ETEC isolates, 15% were LT-only, 58% were ST-only, and 28% produced both LT and ST. The distribution of LT-only (12-15%) and ST-only (55-56%) isolates

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2017 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

83. Travel-acquired ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae: impact of colonization at individual and community level. (PubMed)

on travel-acquired ESBL-PE. The acquisition rates reveal that 2070% of visitors to (sub)tropical regions get colonized by ESBL-PE. The main risk factors predisposing to colonization during travel are destination, travelers diarrhea, and antibiotic use.While most of those colonized remain asymptomatic, acquisition of ESBL-PE may have consequences both at individual and community level. We discuss current efforts to restrict the spread.© International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford (...) Travel-acquired ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae: impact of colonization at individual and community level. Antibiotic resistance is a rapidly increasing global emergency that calls for action from all of society. Intestinal multidrugresistant (MDR) bacteria have spread worldwide with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) -producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) as the most prevalent type. The millions of travelers annually visiting regions with poor hygiene contribute substantially

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2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

84. Spring Adventures: 6 Apps for Healthier Travels

as a backup in case they get lost. This app also has up-to-date recommendations from CDC for international travelers. Another great bonus is that many features are available offline, so you don’t need a data connection to access information. The app also includes local emergency service phone numbers for each country. Can I Eat This? The dreaded Montezuma’s revenge, Delhi belly, or travelersdiarrhea—whatever you call it, can really zap the fun out of international travel. Download CDC’s app to help keep (...) Spring Adventures: 6 Apps for Healthier Travels Spring Adventures: 6 Apps for Healthier Travels | | Blogs | CDC Search Form Controls TOPIC ONLY Search The CDC cancel submit Search Form Controls TOPIC ONLY Search The CDC cancel submit Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: . Search This Blog Search for: Get Email Updates To receive email

2016 CDC Public Health Matters

85. Non-inferiority Trials of the Quality of Nurse Consultation Versus a Medical Consultation in Travel Medicine.

to the individual prevention of the traveler's Malaria, diarrhea and sexually transmitted infections. [ Time Frame: At day 1 ] Evaluated by a post-consultation memorization survey Secondary Outcome Measures : Quality score of the support consultation evaluating the memorization of Information by travelers. [ Time Frame: At day 1 ] Evaluated by memorisation survey Level of satisfaction of travelers [ Time Frame: At day 1 ] The level of satisfaction will be assessed by a visual scale. The relevance of the choice (...) Non-inferiority Trials of the Quality of Nurse Consultation Versus a Medical Consultation in Travel Medicine. Non-inferiority Trials of the Quality of Nurse Consultation Versus a Medical Consultation in Travel Medicine. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies

2017 Clinical Trials

86. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles among Campylobacter isolates obtained from international travelers between 2007 and 2014 (PubMed)

Antibiotic susceptibility profiles among Campylobacter isolates obtained from international travelers between 2007 and 2014 Campylobacter infection is a common cause of diarrhea among international travelers. We studied antibiotic resistance patterns among Campylobacter isolates obtained from international travelers according to travel destination. Three collections of isolates obtained from international travelers between 2007 and 2014 (Institute of Tropical Medicine, the "Laboratoire (...) Hospitalier Universitaire de Bruxelles "and the Belgian National Reference Centre for Campylobacter) were used. Isolates were tested for minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (E-test macromethod) for fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and meropenem. Single isolates from 261 travelers were available; median (IQR) age was 25.4 (4-42) years, 85.8% were symptomatic (information for 224 patients available). Overall resistance to ciprofloxacin was 60.9%, ranging

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2017 European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases

87. Seronegative Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy in a Male Traveler (PubMed)

Seronegative Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy in a Male Traveler Autoimmune enteropathy (AIE) is rare but damaging. The lack of consistent objective findings makes diagnosis a challenge. A 45-year-old male developed noninfectious diarrhea with significant weight loss and electrolyte abnormalities. Computed tomography delineated enteritis. Colonoscopy and esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed villous atrophy, chronic inflammation, and ulceration of the terminal ileum and cecum. Pathology showed (...) cryptitis with apoptosis and abscesses throughout the small and large bowel and absent goblet cells. Steroids rapidly improved symptoms. Anti-enterocyte antibody serologies were negative. Management can be challenging, and, in this case, the patient initially improved with budesonide and infliximab but required alternative anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy after relapsing. This is an unusual presentation of seronegative AIE, which should be considered in cases of persistent severe diarrhea.

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2017 ACG case reports journal

88. Acute Liver Failure in a Patient Travelling From Asia: The Other Face of the Coin of Infectious Disease (PubMed)

Acute Liver Failure in a Patient Travelling From Asia: The Other Face of the Coin of Infectious Disease We present a case of a 63-year-old male who had travelled from South India to United Kingdom (UK) visiting relatives. He had developed episodes of diarrhea, vomiting and fevers while travelling and on assessment in hospital, mild abdominal distension was noted with rapid deterioration to hypovolemic shock. Initial blood test showed a low platelet count with deranged liver function tests (LFTs

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2017 Gastroenterology research

89. Zika virus travels. Computer brain-training prevents dementia? Olympics gene-doping update.

at BuzzFeed, there are 8 for attendees at at the Olympics. (For one thing, it’s winter in Brazil, and therefore not many mosquitoes. Of course, there’s always sex as a transmission agent.) A much bigger health problem than Zika is terrible water quality in Rio. That means traveler’s diarrhea, respiratory infections, hepatitis A. There’s also flu, other mosquito-borne viruses (dengue and chikungunya), parasites, fleas–and crime. Also, of course, many STDs besides Zika. While we’re on the Olympic topic (...) Zika virus travels. Computer brain-training prevents dementia? Olympics gene-doping update. Zika virus travels. Computer brain-training prevents dementia? Olympics gene-doping update. | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental

2016 PLOS Blogs Network

90. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin seroconversion in US travelers to Mexico. (PubMed)

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin seroconversion in US travelers to Mexico. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common bacterial pathogen isolated from travelers suffering of diarrhea. Exposure to heat-labile toxin (LT) produces a high rate of seroconversion. However, the role of LT-producing ETEC (LT-ETEC) as a cause of diarrhea is controversial. We conducted a cohort study in US students traveling to Mexico to assess the ETEC-LT seroconversion rate after (...) ' diarrhea and 33.9% had LT-ETEC identified in their stools. Among individuals having an LT-ETEC strain, 74% seroconverted compared to 11% of those not having diarrhea (p < 0.0001). When analyzed with a logistic regression model, the odds of seroconversion were significantly reduced in participants not having LT-ETEC in their stool (odds ratio = 0.1, p < 0.0001) after adjusting for season, length of stay, age, gender, race, and ethnicity.In US young adults traveling to Mexico, ETEC-LT seroconversion

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2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

91. A preliminary study on travel health issues of medical students undertaking electives. (PubMed)

their elective. They were asked to complete the questionnaire and return it on an anonymous and voluntary basis. In addition, student elective submissions were consulted for information relating to their chosen destination.Results of the study indicate that general practitioners were the most common source of pretravel advice for Tasmanian medical students. Overall, 64% of students experienced some sort of health problem of which travelers' diarrhea was the most common. Most problems were mild and self (...) A preliminary study on travel health issues of medical students undertaking electives. With the inclusion of elective programs, often overseas, in many medical courses, it was decided that a preliminary retrospective analysis of health problems associated with these programs in medical students from the University of Tasmania would be desirable.A questionnaire covering general travel health issues was distributed to all medical students in the University of Tasmania, on return from

2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

92. Medical supplies for travelers to developing countries. (PubMed)

they returned to the UK, asking them to note those items that they included in the kit, those actually used, and any others obtained while they were away. All subjects had consulted the pharmacist concerning the medical kit appropriate for their trip.Two hundred and ninety-nine travelers volunteered to take part, of whom 127 returned the postal questionnaire. Analgesics and medication for the treatment of diarrhea were most likely to be used, but many types of wound dressing were unlikely to be required (...) . Twenty individuals (16%) required antibiotics, with eight people purchasing them while they were away. Thirty-two (31%) individuals did not use insect repellents despite traveling to potentially malaria-endemic countries. Only seven subjects purchased any other items while they were away.The items most likely to be required by travelers to developing countries are analgesics, treatments for diarrhea, antiseptics and sticking plasters. The provision of antibiotics to certain travelers is probably

2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

93. Nationwide survey of the role of travel medicine in primary care in Germany. (PubMed)

% provided medical pretravel advice or post-travel counseling (13.2 patients/month). The most common topics in pretravel consultation were immunizations (95%), malaria chemoprophylaxis (94%), advice on exposure prophylaxis (41%), and advice on protection from sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (43%). GPs frequently advised certain patient groups (e.g., cardiovascular patients 68%, pregnant women 20%). Travelers' diarrhea was the most common topic in post-travel consultation (89%), followed by fever (...) Nationwide survey of the role of travel medicine in primary care in Germany. With more persons traveling to (sub)tropical destinations, travel medicine is an increasing challenge for the health care system in many countries. This study investigated the role and scope of travel medicine provided by general practitioners (GPs) in primary health care, assessed the determinants of specific prophylactic recommendations, and identified the needs of GPs regarding training and cooperation in travel

2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

94. Risk and spectrum of diseases in travelers to popular tourist destinations. (PubMed)

Risk and spectrum of diseases in travelers to popular tourist destinations. Traveling to tropical regions is related to increased health risks. Travelers' diarrhea is the most frequent health problem, but the range of travel-related diseases also includes potential life-threatening diseases such as malaria. The actual risk of European travelers acquiring specific infectious diseases and other hazards in the tropics is to a large extent unknown and is therefore often adopted from (...) recommended dietary restrictions. Among travelers visiting malaria-endemic areas, 20% did not carry any antimalarial drugs with them, not continuous chemoprophylaxis or standby medication.Because of the rising travel activity, especially to tropical countries, the importance of qualified pretravel advice consultation is increasing. To improve the travelers' health, attention needs to be paid to individual risk factors, the prevention and therapy of travelers' diarrhea, malaria prophylaxis, management

2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

95. Illness in returned travelers and immigrants/refugees: the 6-year experience of two Australian infectious diseases units. (PubMed)

, malaria (19%), gastroenteritis/diarrhea (15%), and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) (7%) were the most common diagnoses. When compared with immigrants/refugees, travelers were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with gastroenteritis/diarrhea [odds ratio (OR) 8], malaria (OR 7), pneumonia (OR 6), URTI (OR 3), skin infection, dengue fever, typhoid/paratyphoid fever, influenza, and rickettsial disease. They were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with leprosy (OR 0.03), chronic (...) Illness in returned travelers and immigrants/refugees: the 6-year experience of two Australian infectious diseases units. Data comparing returned travelers and immigrants/refugees managed in a hospital setting is lacking.We prospectively collected data on 1,106 patients with an illness likely acquired overseas who presented to two hospital-based Australian infectious diseases units over a 6-year period.Eighty-three percent of patients were travelers and 17% immigrants/refugees. In travelers

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2017 Journal of Travel Medicine

96. Development and Accuracy of Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Detection and Quantification of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Heat Labile and Heat Stable Toxin Genes in Travelers' Diarrhea Samples. (PubMed)

Development and Accuracy of Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Detection and Quantification of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Heat Labile and Heat Stable Toxin Genes in Travelers' Diarrhea Samples. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the leading bacterial pathogen of travelers' diarrhea, is routinely detected by an established DNA hybridization protocol that is neither sensitive nor quantitative. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR

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2013 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

97. Travelers' diarrhea: Prevention, treatment, and post-trip evaluation. (PubMed)

Travelers' diarrhea: Prevention, treatment, and post-trip evaluation. 23957028 2013 11 04 2013 11 21 1533-7294 62 7 2013 Jul The Journal of family practice J Fam Pract Travelers' diarrhea: prevention, treatment, and post-trip evaluation. 356-61 Nair Dilip D Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA. nair@marshall.edu eng Case Reports Journal Article United States J Fam Pract 7502590 0094-3509 0 Anti-Bacterial Agents 0 Antidiarrheals 6X9OC3H4II Loperamide (...) 83905-01-5 Azithromycin AIM IM J Fam Pract. 2013 Sep;62(9):464 Adult Anti-Bacterial Agents administration & dosage Antibiotic Prophylaxis Antidiarrheals therapeutic use Azithromycin administration & dosage Beverages Chemoprevention Diarrhea epidemiology microbiology prevention & control therapy Female Food Humans Loperamide therapeutic use Risk Factors Travel 2013 8 20 6 0 2013 8 21 6 0 2013 11 5 6 0 ppublish 23957028 jfp_6207g

2013 Journal of Family Practice

98. Post-infectious sequelae of travelers' diarrhea. (PubMed)

Post-infectious sequelae of travelers' diarrhea. Travelers' diarrhea (TD) has generally been considered a self-limited disorder which resolves more quickly with expeditious and appropriate antibiotic therapy given bacteria are the most frequently identified cause. However, epidemiological, clinical, and basic science evidence identifying a number of chronic health conditions related to these infections has recently emerged which challenges this current paradigm. These include serious (...) and potentially disabling enteric and extra-intestinal long-term complications. Among these are rheumatologic, neurologic, gastrointestinal, renal, and endocrine disorders. This review aims to examine and summarize the current literature pertaining to three of these post-infectious disorders: reactive arthritis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the relationship of these conditions to diarrhea associated with travel as well as to diarrhea associated with gastroenteritis

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2013 Journal of Travel Medicine

99. A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of an Oral Synbiotic (AKSB) for Prevention of Travelers' Diarrhea. (PubMed)

A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of an Oral Synbiotic (AKSB) for Prevention of Travelers' Diarrhea. Travelers' diarrhea (TD) is a significant problem for travelers. TD is treatable once it occurs, but few options for prevention exist. Probiotics have been studied for prevention or treatment of TD; however, very few combination probiotics have been studied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if prophylactic use of an oral synbiotic could reduce the risk (...) and 53.9% in the placebo (p = 0.8864). Among the subjects who experienced diarrhea (n = 107) there was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects that took antibiotics versus those that did not take antibiotics (35% vs 29%, p = 0.68). AKSB was safe with no difference in toxicity between the two arms.The prophylactic oral synbiotic was safe but did not reduce the risk of developing TD among travelers, nor did it decrease the duration of TD or the use of antibiotics when TD occurred.© 2013

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2013 Journal of Travel Medicine

100. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of 9 pathogens directly from stools of travelers with diarrhea. (PubMed)

A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of 9 pathogens directly from stools of travelers with diarrhea. Every year, 80 million tourists traveling to tropical and subtropical areas contract traveler's diarrhea (TD). Forty percent to 80% of cases are caused by bacteria, yet clinical diagnostic tests are available to identify only a few of the strains that cause TD. We aimed to develop a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to identify all major pathogens (...) positive and negative stool samples. In addition, stool samples were collected from 96 returning travelers with TD. The findings were compared with those from routine diagnostic tests.The assay detected the bacterial strains with 100% sensitivity and specificity, compared with results from the reference tests. Of all stool samples collected from travelers with TD, EPEC was found in 47%, EAEC in 46%, ETEC in 22%, enterohemorrhagic E coli in 7%, Campylobacter in 6%, Shigella or enteroinvasive E coli in 2

2013 Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

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