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Travelers Diarrhea

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61. A Study Comparing Two Rifaximin Tablets in Patients With Travelers' Diarrhea.

A Study Comparing Two Rifaximin Tablets in Patients With Travelers' Diarrhea. A Study Comparing Two Rifaximin Tablets in Patients With Travelers' Diarrhea. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . A Study Comparing Two Rifaximin Tablets in Patients With Travelers' Diarrhea. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02920242 Recruitment Status : Terminated (Terminated due to low enrollment) First Posted : September 30, 2016 Results First Posted : March 25, 2019 Last Update Posted : March 25

2016 Clinical Trials

62. Encouraging Travellers to take Preventive Measures Against Travel-Related Communicable Diseases: A Rapid Review of the Literature

(quality: A-II). 3,iii Information presented in both verbal and written form can increase compliance with preventive measures (quality: A-II). 3, iv Health education for travellers should be tailored based on travel itinerary. Topics include 3, v : ? vaccine-preventable illness. ? avoidance of insects. ? malaria chemoprophylaxis. ? prevention and self-treatment of traveller’s diarrhoea. ? responsible personal behaviour. ? sexually transmitted infections and safety. ? travel medical insurance. ? access (...) Encouraging Travellers to take Preventive Measures Against Travel-Related Communicable Diseases: A Rapid Review of the Literature Encouraging travellers to take preventive measures against travel-related communicable diseases: a rapid review of the literature Maureen Horn, Communicable Disease Epidemiologist Abidah Ratansi, Analyst – Research & Policy Monali Varia, Manager Infection Prevention & Surveillance July 12, 2013 Table of Contents Acknowledgements 2 Key Messages 3 Executive Summary 4 1

2013 Peel Health Library

63. Pharmacy travel health services: current perspectives and future prospects Full Text available with Trip Pro

therapy, and given the largely preventive nature of most travel health recommendations, pharmacists are well suited to help address this need. Pharmacists generally possess a high degree of knowledge and confidence with more commonly observed travel health topics in community practice such as travelers' diarrhea; however, training in more specialized travel health topics such as travel vaccinations and traveling at altitude has generally been lacking from pharmacy curricula. Pharmacists (...) Pharmacy travel health services: current perspectives and future prospects Rates of international travel are increasing annually, with particular growth observed in travel to Southeast Asia and to emerging economies. While all patients traveling across geographic regions are recommended to receive a pre-travel consultation to consider their individual risks, many do not, or receive care and recommendations that are not consistent with current evidence-based guidelines. As experts in drug

2018 Integrated pharmacy research & practice

64. A review of antibiotic prophylaxis for traveler’s diarrhea: past to present Full Text available with Trip Pro

A review of antibiotic prophylaxis for traveler’s diarrhea: past to present As there is rapid increase in international travel to tropical and subtropical countries, there will likely be more people exposed to diarrheal pathogens in these moderate to high risk areas and subsequent increased concern for traveler's diarrhea. The disease may appear as a mild clinical syndrome, yet a more debilitating presentation can lead to itinerary changes and hospitalization. As bacterial etiologies (...) are the most common causative agents of TD, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent TD has been reported among travelers for several years. The most common type of antibiotic used for TD has changed over 50 years, depending on many influencing factors. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis for TD prevention in travelers is still controversial, mainly because of difficulties balancing the risks and benefits. Many factors, such as emerging drug resistance, side effects, cost and risk behavior need

2018 Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines

65. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in different diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes responsible for complicated, non-complicated, and travelers' diarrhea cases. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in different diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes responsible for complicated, non-complicated, and travelers' diarrhea cases. 26711743 2016 12 13 2018 11 13 1098-6596 60 3 2015 Dec 28 Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Different Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Pathotypes Responsible for Complicated, Noncomplicated, and Traveler's Diarrhea Cases. 1950-1 10.1128/AAC.02909-15 (...) United States Antimicrob Agents Chemother 0315061 0066-4804 0 Escherichia coli Proteins 0 Qnr protein, E coli 0 Quinolones EC 3.5.2.- beta-lactamase CTX-M-15 EC 3.5.2.6 beta-Lactamases EC 3.5.2.6 beta-lactamase TEM-1 IM Diarrhea drug therapy microbiology Escherichia coli Proteins genetics metabolism Humans Plasmids genetics Quinolones therapeutic use Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli drug effects genetics beta-Lactamases genetics metabolism 2015 12 30 6 0 2015 12 30 6 0 2016 12 15 6 0 epublish

2015 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

66. Study Comparing Rifaximin With Xifaxan 200mg in Traveler's Diarrhea

Study Comparing Rifaximin With Xifaxan 200mg in Traveler's Diarrhea Study Comparing Rifaximin With Xifaxan 200mg in Traveler's Diarrhea - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study Comparing (...) Rifaximin With Xifaxan 200mg in Traveler's Diarrhea The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02498418 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : July 15, 2015 Last Update Posted : June 27, 2017 Sponsor: Actavis Inc. Information provided by (Responsible Party): Actavis Inc. Study Details Study

2015 Clinical Trials

67. Trial Evaluating Chemoprophylaxis Against Travelers' Diarrhea

Trial Evaluating Chemoprophylaxis Against Travelers' Diarrhea Trial Evaluating Chemoprophylaxis Against Travelers' Diarrhea - Prevent TD - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Trial Evaluating (...) Chemoprophylaxis Against Travelers' Diarrhea - Prevent TD The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02498301 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : July 15, 2015 Last Update Posted : January 21, 2019 See Sponsor

2015 Clinical Trials

68. An update on travelers' diarrhea. (Abstract)

An update on travelers' diarrhea. Travelers' diarrhea, affecting millions of travelers every year globally, continues to be a leading cause of morbidity despite advances in vaccination, prevention, and treatment. Complications of travelers' diarrhea often present to gastroenterologists and some patients followed by gastroenterologists are at higher risk of developing travelers' diarrhea. This review will provide an update on recent progress made in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis (...) , prevention, and treatment of travelers' diarrhea.Most causes of travelers' diarrhea remain bacterial, but newly recognized pathogens are emerging. Patient-related and travel-related factors affect disease development risk and should guide prophylaxis and treatment. Although specific vaccines are being developed, they have not yet had a major impact on travelers' diarrhea, and understanding their roles and limitations is especially important. Prophylaxis and treatment of populations at risk (children

2015 Current opinion in gastroenterology

69. Travel style is a major risk factor for diarrhoea in India: a prospective cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Travel style is a major risk factor for diarrhoea in India: a prospective cohort study. Although some studies suggested specific foods/beverages as risk factors for travellers' diarrhoea (TD), details of transmission remain unclear. We assessed the influence of travel style (luxury/middle-class versus backpacking) on TD risk. TD attack rates were compared in a prospective study among travellers to India at the University of Zurich's Travel Clinic. Information on consumption of foods/beverages (...) was collected. Seventy-one luxury/middle-class travellers and 21 backpackers completed the study; overall 37% suffered from TD (62% backpackers, 30% luxury/middle-class travellers, OR 4.43, p 0.022). Travel style rather than the consumption of specific foods/beverages appears to be a risk factor for TD development. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2015 Clinical Microbiology and Infection

70. Immunizations - travel

risk to travellers overseas. Vaccination against these diseases may be recommended in particular circumstances: Cholera. Hepatitis B. Japanese encephalitis. Rabies. Tick-borne encephalitis. The most common infectious diseases contracted abroad cannot effectively be vaccinated against, including: Travellers' diarrhoea. Malaria. Sexually transmitted infections. Parasitic infestation. The risk of contracting an infectious disease abroad depends upon: The region visited — the risk may vary from country (...) areas than in urbanized or developed areas. Hence backpacking may be more dangerous than a package holiday, and work in rural or wild areas is often particularly high risk. The age and health of the traveller — some people may be more susceptible to infections. Advise that the most common infectious diseases contracted abroad cannot effectively be prevented by vaccination. Travellers' diarrhoea may occur in up to 50% of visitors abroad and can generally be prevented by avoiding contaminated food

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

71. Acute diarrhoea in adults: racecadotril

to have similar efficacy to loperamide in reducing the duration of diarrhoea and frequency of stool output, and causes fewer adverse effects, it is unclear where it fits within current UK practice. According to the Health Protection Agency most infectious diarrhoea in the UK is self-limiting: nearly half of episodes last less than 1 day. Specialists have suggested that racecadotril might have a place in the treatment of travel-associated diarrhoea or chronic diarrhoea of unknown cause. However (...) Acute diarrhoea in adults: racecadotril Acute diarrhoea in adults: r Acute diarrhoea in adults: racecadotril acecadotril Evidence summary Published: 12 March 2013 nice.org.uk/guidance/esnm11 pathways Ov Overview erview The content of this evidence summary was up-to-date in March 2013. See summaries of product characteristics (SPCs), British national formulary (BNF) or the MHRA or NICE websites for up-to-date information. Key points from the evidence Racecadotril received a UK marketing

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

72. Diarrhoea

of stools including consistency, colour, presence of mucous or blood timing of the problem current and recent medications such as laxatives, broad spectrum antibiotics recent foreign travel. Examination and investigations Exclude faecal impaction and intestinal obstruction: rectal examination, abdominal palpation. Abdominal x-ray may be required to confirm. Persistent watery diarrhoea with systemic upset which might indicate an infective cause may require investigation. Management General measures (...) Diarrhoea Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines - Diarrhoea Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines search / / / Diarrhoea Diarrhoea Introduction Diarrhoea is the passage of frequent loose stools with urgency. It can be defined as the passage of more than three unformed stools within a 24 hour period. Patients may describe diarrhoea as a single loose stool, frequent stools of normal or even hard consistency, or faecal incontinence, so careful clarification of the term is always required. Diarrhoea

2015 Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines

73. Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated

topic does not cover the management of acute gastroenteritis (including presumed infectious gastroenteritis) in adults and children, diarrhoea due to food poisoning, or traveller's diarrhoea. These are covered in the CKS topics on and . There are separate CKS topics on , , , , and . The target audience for this CKS topic is healthcare professionals working within the NHS in the UK, and providing first contact or primary health care. How up-to-date is this topic? How up-to-date is this topic? Changes (...) — for example, among other elderly residents in a care or nursing home. Stop any antibiotics not being used for treating C. difficile infection, if this is appropriate. Seek specialist advice if this is not possible and the diarrhoea is severe. Manage fluid loss as for acute gastroenteritis (for further information see , in the CKS topic on ). Avoid the use of antimotility drugs (such as loperamide) to treat diarrhoeal symptoms. If possible, avoid other drugs with anti-peristaltic effects (such as opioids

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

74. Anti-diarrhea activity of the aqueous root bark extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus on castor oil-induced diarrhea in Wistar rats Full Text available with Trip Pro

extract of B. coccineus also decreased the distance travelled by activated charcoal in the gastrointestinal tract of treated rats when compared to control rats. Results of castor oil-induced enteropooling revealed slight reduction in the weight of intestinal contents of treated rats compared to control rats. There was significant (p<0.05) decrease in the frequency of defecation as well as in the number of unformed feces produced by castor oil-induced diarrhea at 100 mg/kg dose with 74.96% inhibition (...) Anti-diarrhea activity of the aqueous root bark extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus on castor oil-induced diarrhea in Wistar rats The use of traditional medicine as an alternative source of cure for many ailments has played an important role in health care delivery in both developing and developed countries. Byrsocarpus coccineus Schum and Thonn (Connaraceae) is used in traditional medicine for treatment of various disease conditions, including diarrhea. The anti-diarrhea activity of the root bark

2017 Veterinary world

75. Prophylactic doxycycline for travelers' diarrhea. Results of a prospective double-blind study of Peace Corps volunteers in Kenya. (Abstract)

Prophylactic doxycycline for travelers' diarrhea. Results of a prospective double-blind study of Peace Corps volunteers in Kenya. We performed a randomized double-blind study to determine the efficacy of doxycycline (100 mg daily) in preventing travelers' diarrhea among 39 Peace Corps volunteers during their first five weeks in Kenya. The volunteers took either doxycycline or placebo for three weeks and were observed for an additional two weeks. Nine of 21 taking placebo and one of 18 taking (...) doxycycline had travelers' diarrhea during the treatment period (P = 0.012). The protection seemed to persist for at least one week after the drug was stopped. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was the only pathogen isolated from the placebo group, but was not detected in persons taking doxycycline. None of these organisms were resistant to doxycycline or tetracycline, whereas resistance to tetracyclines and other antibiotics was common among the nonenterotoxigenic Esch. coli. We conclude that doxycycline

1978 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

76. Diarrhoea - adult's assessment

after foreign travel (tests for ova, cysts, and parasites should also be requested). Amoebae, Giardia, or cryptosporidium are suspected, particularly if diarrhoea is persistent (14 days or more) or the person has travelled to an at-risk area. There is a need to exclude infectious diarrhoea. Investigations for chronic diarrhoea should be tailored to the individual, but blood tests should be requested in all people presenting with this problem. These include full blood count, urea and electrolytes (...) , and in less developed countries [ ; ]. Chronic diarrhoea can negatively impact on quality of life, for example, avoidance of travelling or going to new places where access to toilet facilities may be difficult; and adaptation of food choices to avoid exacerbating diarrhoea [ ]. For information on the complications occurring as a result of specific infections causing diarrhoea, see the CKS topic on . For complications of conditions causing diarrhoea, see the appropriate CKS topic, for example

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

77. Duration of travel-associated faecal colonisation with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae - A one year follow-up study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

the Etest.Among 64 participants with travel-associated colonisation with ESBL-PE, sustained carriage was seen in 20/63 (32%), 16/63 (25%), 9/63 (14%) and 7/64 (11%) at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after return from their journey, respectively. The majority, 44 (69%) of travellers were short-term carriers with ESBL-PE only detected in the initial post-travel stool sample. Evaluation of risk factors demonstrated a decreased risk of becoming a long-term carrier among travellers with diarrhoea while abroad and a history (...) of a new journey during the follow-up period. High susceptible rates were demonstrated to carbapenems (97-100%), temocillin (95%), mecillinam (97%), amikacin (98%), fosfomycin (98%), nitrofurantoin (99%) and tigecycline (97%).Travel-associated faecal colonisation with ESBL-PE appears to be transient and generally brief. Diarrhoea while abroad or a new trip abroad during the follow-up period decreased the risk of becoming a long-term carrier. Only 11% of travellers who acquired ESBL-PE during

2018 PLoS ONE

78. Antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter and other diarrheal pathogens isolated from US military personnel deployed to Thailand in 2002–2004: a case–control study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter and other diarrheal pathogens isolated from US military personnel deployed to Thailand in 2002–2004: a case–control study Campylobacter continues to be an important cause of diarrheal disease worldwide and a leading cause in Southeast Asia. Studies of US soldiers and marines deployed to Thailand for a 2 to 3 week field exercise provide a unique population in which to study traveler's diarrhea.A case-control study of 217 deployed military personnel (...) was conducted from 2002 through 2004. Of these, 155 subjects who presented to a field medical unit with acute diarrhea were enrolled as cases. These subjects referred an additional 62 diarrhea-free colleagues who served as controls. Frequencies of isolation of Campylobacter spp. and other enteric pathogens were compared in cases and controls, and antibiotic resistance of isolates was described.Of the 155 subjects with diarrhea, Campylobacter spp. was the most commonly identified pathogen, found in 54 (35

2017 Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines

79. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Acute Diarrheal Infections in Adults

contraindications to use and can adhere to the frequent dosing requirements. (Strong recommendation, high level of evidence) 17. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics for prevention of TD are not recommended. (Conditional recommendation, low level of evidence) 18. Antibiotic chemoprophylaxis has moderate to good effectiveness and may be considered in high-risk groups for short-term use. (Strong recommenda- tion, high level of evidence) TD, traveler’s diarrhea. Clinical Guideline: Acute Diarrheal Infections © (...) acute bacterial diarrhea (as opposed to protozoan) for purposes of self-treatment, this approach is at best empiric, and although may be suitable for travelers in remote destinations, it does not translate well to the individual with community acquired dia r rhe a ( 29 ). Conventional diagnostic approaches to diarrheal disease require multiple procedures: bacterial culture, microscopy with and without stains or immunofl uorescence and stool antigen tests for detection of protozoa, and for detecting

2016 American College of Gastroenterology

80. Efficacy of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine system in travelers to India. (Abstract)

Efficacy of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine system in travelers to India. A patch vaccine containing heat-labile toxin (LT) from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has demonstrated to be beneficial in reducing the rate and severity of travelers' diarrhea in Latin America. To evaluate the efficacy of this transdermal vaccine system in an area with a different diarrheal pathogen profile, an additional phase 2 study was conducted in European travelers to India.For this multicenter, randomized (...) diarrheas were observed in India. The vaccine delivery system frequently produced rash and pruritus at the site of application, long term hyperpigmentation persisted in a minority of LT recipients, and also few site reactions were noted in the placebo group.The evaluated patch vaccine failed to satisfy mainly with respect to protective efficacy. Noninvasive prophylactic agents against travelers' diarrhea, particularly vaccines against the most frequent pathogens, thus continue to be badly needed.© 2013

2013 Journal of Travel Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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