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Transient Monocular Blindness

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1. Transient Monocular Blindness

Transient Monocular Blindness Transient Monocular Blindness Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Transient Monocular (...) Blindness Transient Monocular Blindness Aka: Transient Monocular Blindness , Amaurosis Fugax II. Definition Transient painless unilateral III. Symptoms ("Fleeting blindness") Sudden painless, unilateral blindness Vision returns to normal in 1-10 minutes "Shade or curtain" descends over affected eye IV. Causes Transient (embolism) ischemia ( or ) May be associated with temporal , or history V. Labs Age over 50 years old ( risk) (ESR) (CRP) VI. Differential Diagnosis See VII. Precautions Transient may

2018 FP Notebook

2. Transient monocular blindness and the risk of vascular complications according to subtype: a prospective cohort study (PubMed)

Transient monocular blindness and the risk of vascular complications according to subtype: a prospective cohort study Patients with transient monocular blindness (TMB) can present with many different symptoms, and diagnosis is usually based on the history alone. In this study, we assessed the risk of vascular complications according to different characteristics of TMB. We prospectively studied 341 consecutive patients with TMB. All patients were interviewed by a single investigator

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2016 Journal of neurology

3. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy and Monocular Blindness following Transnasal Penetrating Optic Canal Injury by a Wooden Foreign Body (PubMed)

Traumatic Optic Neuropathy and Monocular Blindness following Transnasal Penetrating Optic Canal Injury by a Wooden Foreign Body To report a case of right eye blindness due to a penetrating injury in the contralateral nostril.This is a case report of a 67-year-old patient who presented to the emergency room complaining of transient blurred vision in his right eye after falling on a small branch with no apparent injury besides minor lacerations. The following day, the patient experienced (...) blindness in the right eye. Physical examination revealed small lacerations on his left forehead and optic neuropathy on the right side with no other obvious discerning physical or imaging abnormalities.After elevated suspicion and reassessment of the neuroimaging findings, a radiolucent track was observed in the nasal cavity, continuing up from the left nostril to the right optic nerve. Transnasal endoscopic surgery was performed and a long wooden branch was removed from the nasal cavity.A nasally

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2018 Case reports in ophthalmology

4. Clopidogrel effective for frequent transient monocular blindness caused by vulnerable plaque. (PubMed)

Clopidogrel effective for frequent transient monocular blindness caused by vulnerable plaque. Transient monocular blindness (TMB) is a well-known warning symptom of impending cerebral or retinal infarction, which suggests vulnerable ipsilateral carotid disease. Instability of free-floating thrombus may cause recurrent artery-to-artery embolism. A recent study showed that a combination of clopidogrel and aspirin might reduce microthromboembolisms. Here, we report a patient with frequent TMB

2013 Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia

5. Internal jugular venous abnormalities in transient monocular blindness. (PubMed)

Internal jugular venous abnormalities in transient monocular blindness. The etiology of transient monocular blindness (TMB) in patients without carotid stenosis has been linked to ocular venous hypertension, for their increased retrobulbar vascular resistance, sustained retinal venule dilatation and higher frequency of jugular venous reflux (JVR). This study aimed to elucidate whether there are anatomical abnormalities at internal jugular vein (IJV) in TMB patients that would contribute

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2013 BMC Neurology

6. Transient Monocular Blindness

Transient Monocular Blindness Transient Monocular Blindness Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Transient Monocular (...) Blindness Transient Monocular Blindness Aka: Transient Monocular Blindness , Amaurosis Fugax II. Definition Transient painless unilateral III. Symptoms ("Fleeting blindness") Sudden painless, unilateral blindness Vision returns to normal in 1-10 minutes "Shade or curtain" descends over affected eye IV. Causes Transient (embolism) ischemia ( or ) May be associated with temporal , or history V. Labs Age over 50 years old ( risk) (ESR) (CRP) VI. Differential Diagnosis See VII. Precautions Transient may

2015 FP Notebook

7. Recurrent Transient Monocular Blindness (PubMed)

Recurrent Transient Monocular Blindness 14067677 1996 12 01 2018 12 01 0007-1447 2 5362 1963 Oct 12 British medical journal Br Med J RECURRENT TRANSIENT MONOCULAR BLINDNESS. 894-7 ASHBY M M OAKLEY N N LORENTZ I I SCOTT D D eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Anticoagulants OM Amaurosis Fugax Anticoagulants Blindness Carotid Artery Thrombosis Cerebral Angiography Embolism Humans Retinal Vessels ANTICOAGULANTS BLINDNESS CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY EMBOLISM

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1963 British medical journal

8. A Case of Alternating Transient Monocular Blindness Ending in Complete Loss of Vision in the Left Eye (PubMed)

A Case of Alternating Transient Monocular Blindness Ending in Complete Loss of Vision in the Left Eye 16692326 2006 06 01 2008 11 20 0065-9533 13 Pt 3 1914 Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc A Case of Alternating Transient Monocular Blindness Ending in Complete Loss of Vision in the Left Eye. 796-818 Langdon H M HM eng Journal Article United States Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 7506106 0065-9533 1914 1 1 0 0 1914 1 1 0 1 1914 1 1 0 0 ppublish 16692326

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1914 Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society

9. Embolic and nonembolic transient monocular visual field loss: a clinicopathologic review. (PubMed)

Embolic and nonembolic transient monocular visual field loss: a clinicopathologic review. Transient monocular blindness and amaurosis fugax are umbrella terms describing a range of patterns of transient monocular visual field loss (TMVL). The incidence rises from ≈1.5/100,000 in the third decade of life to ≈32/100,000 in the seventh decade of life. We review the vascular supply of the retina that provides an anatomical basis for the types of TMVL and discuss the importance of collaterals

2013 Survey of Ophthalmology

10. Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack | Stroke Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search April 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article (...) Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association , MD, Chair , MD, MSc, MAS, Vice Chair , MD , MD , MBChB, FAHA , MBChB, PhD , MD, MPH , MD, FAHA , MD, MPH, FAHA , MD , MD, PhD , MD, FAHA , MD, MPH, FAHA , PhD, RN, FAHA , MD , PhD , and MD, FAHA MDon behalf of the American Heart Association Stroke Council, Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing

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2014 American Heart Association

11. An audit of management practices in patients with suspected temporary monocular blindness. (PubMed)

An audit of management practices in patients with suspected temporary monocular blindness. The highest risk period for suffering a stroke after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or temporary monocular blindness (TMB) is the first 14 days and this is the recommended threshold for performing carotid endarterectomy (CEA). However, evidence suggests that TMB patients face significant delays in starting medical therapy and undergoing CEA. This study audited management practices in an ophthalmology

2013 British Journal of Ophthalmology

12. SpecTRA; An Observational Study of the Verification of Protein Biomarkers in Transient Ischemic Attack.

in the Verification study 1 Cohort B. Exclusion Criteria: Stroke requiring admission to hospital based on only clinical observations (including CT scan) made before the MRI. Unable to have MRI/CT Subject unable to provide consent. Isolated monocular blindness. Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor. Please refer to this study by its (...) SpecTRA; An Observational Study of the Verification of Protein Biomarkers in Transient Ischemic Attack. SpecTRA; An Observational Study of the Verification of Protein Biomarkers in Transient Ischemic Attack. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2017 Clinical Trials

13. SpecTRA; A Study of the Validation of Protein Biomarkers in Transient Ischemic Attack

4 on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity scale (NIHSS <4). Contraindications to brain imaging. Non-English speaking, unless translator present. Isolated monocular blindness. Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor. Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03070067 (...) SpecTRA; A Study of the Validation of Protein Biomarkers in Transient Ischemic Attack SpecTRA; A Study of the Validation of Protein Biomarkers in Transient Ischemic Attack - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before

2017 Clinical Trials

14. Transient Ischemic Attack

(especially if not ) Confusion Loss of consciousness Scintillating Scotoma Drop attacks (sudden spontaneous fall) X. Signs Findings most suggestive of TIA or CVA Unilateral motor weakness May be associated with spasticity, or rigidity Speech deficits deficits: ral Facial drooping Lateral movement deficits: Vision Hemianopia Monocular blindness Disconjugate gaze Cerebellar deficits and vestibular dysfunction XI. Symptoms and Signs: Localizing findings Timing Carotid TIAs resolve within 14 minutes l TIA (...) Transient Ischemic Attack Transient Ischemic Attack Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Transient Ischemic Attack

2018 FP Notebook

15. Spectrum of Transient Visual Symptoms in a Transient Ischemic Attack Cohort. (PubMed)

attack admitted to the SOS-TIA clinic between January 2003 and December 2008 underwent immediate evaluation and treatment.Eight hundred twenty-six (34.5%) patients had TVS, including 422 (17.6%) patients with isolated TVS. Transient monocular blindness was the most frequent TVS (36.3%), followed by diplopia (13.4%), homonymous lateral hemianopia (12.3%), bilateral positive visual phenomena (10.8%), and lone bilateral blindness (4.5%). Positive diffusion-weighted imaging was found in 11.8%, 8.1%, 8.1 (...) %, and 5.0% of patients with homonymous lateral hemianopia, diplopia, lone bilateral blindness, and transient monocular blindness, respectively. Among 1850 patients (595 patients with TVS) with definite/possible transient ischemic attack or minor stroke, a major source of embolism of cardiac or arterial origin was found less frequently in patients with isolated or nonisolated TVS than in patients without TVS (19.6%; 19.7% versus 28.1%, respectively; P<0.001). However, we found a higher rate of atrial

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2013 Stroke

16. Transient Ischemic Attack

(especially if not ) Confusion Loss of consciousness Scintillating Scotoma Drop attacks (sudden spontaneous fall) X. Signs Findings most suggestive of TIA or CVA Unilateral motor weakness May be associated with spasticity, or rigidity Speech deficits deficits: ral Facial drooping Lateral movement deficits: Vision Hemianopia Monocular blindness Disconjugate gaze Cerebellar deficits and vestibular dysfunction XI. Symptoms and Signs: Localizing findings Timing Carotid TIAs resolve within 14 minutes l TIA (...) Transient Ischemic Attack Transient Ischemic Attack Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Transient Ischemic Attack

2015 FP Notebook

17. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

cardiovascular disorder that produces emboli or a very high Hct. Etiology reference 1. : Pioglitazone after Ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. N Engl J Med 374 (14):1321–1331, 2016. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1506930. Symptoms and Signs Neurologic deficits are similar to those of strokes (see Table: ). Transient monocular blindness (amaurosis fugax), which usually lasts < 5 min, may occur when the ophthalmic artery is affected. Table Selected Stroke Syndromes Symptoms and Signs Syndrome Contralateral (...) blindness, memory loss, unilateral 3rd cranial nerve palsy, hemiballismus Posterior cerebral artery Monocular loss of vision (amaurosis) Ophthalmic artery (a branch of the internal carotid artery) Unilateral or bilateral cranial nerve deficits (eg, nystagmus, vertigo, dysphagia, dysarthria, diplopia, blindness), truncal or limb ataxia, spastic paresis, crossed sensory and motor deficits*, impaired consciousness, coma, death (if basilar artery occlusion is complete), tachycardia, labile BP

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

19. CRACKCast E103 – Headache Disorders

neurologic abnor malities, and headaches with an abrupt onset. Don’t forget to think about worst first in every patient: SAH TIA / stroke Brain mass Idiopathic intracranial hypertension! Retinal migraine Rare syndrome consisting of recurrent attacks of monocular visual dysfunction, including positive features (such as, scintillations) or negative features (such as, blindness). As with aura, these symptoms are completely reversible. Hemiplegic migraine Motor aura consisting of hemiparesis or hemiplegia (...) CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, OTHER FACIAL PAINS, AND OTHER HEADACHES Other benign primary headaches Headache attributed to psychiatric disorder 2) What are the IHSC for migraine without aura (common migraine) and migraine with aura (classic migraine) 80% of migraines are without an aura. Migraine with aura is primarily characterized by the transient focal neurological symptoms that usually precede or sometimes accompany the headache. Some patients also experience a premonitory phase, occurring hours or days

2017 CandiEM

20. CRACKCast E101 – Stroke

by the anterior and posterior circulations. The anterior circulation originates from the carotid system and perfuses 80% of the brain, including the optic nerve, retina, and fronto-parietal and anterior-temporal lobes. The first branch off the internal carotid artery is the ophthalmic artery, which supplies the optic nerve and retina. As a result, the sudden onset of painless monocular blindness (amaurosis fugax) identifies the stroke as involving the anterior circulation (specifically the ipsilateral carotid (...) here. The episode we all feared…Let’s jump into this content. You know, we do heavy topics on CRACKCast, here’s another heavy weight… “Stroke can be defined as any vascular injury that reduces cerebral blood flow (CBF) to a specific region of the brain, retina, or spinal cord, causing neurologic impairment. The onset of symptoms may be sudden or stuttering, often with transient or permanent loss of neurologic function.” The brain needs oxygen and glucose and when a stroke occurs that fine balance

2017 CandiEM

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