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Toxin Induced pulmonary edema

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1. Toxin Induced pulmonary edema

Toxin Induced pulmonary edema Toxin Induced pulmonary edema Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Toxin Induced pulmonary (...) edema Toxin Induced pulmonary edema Aka: Toxin Induced pulmonary edema II. Causes (Mnemonic: MOPS) , s Phenobarbital, Propoxyphene s Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Toxin Induced pulmonary edema." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Radiology About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical

2018 FP Notebook

2. Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Evidence-based clinical practice guideline on antibiotic use for the urgent management of pulpal- and periapical-related dental pain and intraoral swelling - The Journal of the American Dental Association Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 150, Issue 11, Pages 906–921.e12 Evidence-based clinical practice guideline (...) on antibiotic use for the urgent management of pulpal- and periapical-related dental pain and intraoral swelling A report from the American Dental Association x Peter B. Lockhart , DDS , x Malavika P. Tampi Correspondence Address correspondence to Ms. Tampi at Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry, Science Institute, American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611 , MPH ∗ , x Malavika P. Tampi Correspondence Address correspondence to Ms. Tampi at Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

2020 American Dental Association Guidelines

3. Toxin Induced pulmonary edema

Toxin Induced pulmonary edema Toxin Induced pulmonary edema Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Toxin Induced pulmonary (...) edema Toxin Induced pulmonary edema Aka: Toxin Induced pulmonary edema II. Causes (Mnemonic: MOPS) , s Phenobarbital, Propoxyphene s Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Toxin Induced pulmonary edema." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Radiology About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical

2015 FP Notebook

4. Diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: A Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline update

thromboembolic material? In patients with suspected CTEPH, should magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography (MRPA) be used to establish the diagnosis and assess the anatomic extent and location of chronic thromboembolic material? Table 1. Updated clinical classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH). 2 1. PAH 1.1 Idiopathic PAH 1.2 Heritable PAH 1.3 Drug – and toxin-induced PAH 1.4 PAH associated with: 1.4.1 Connective tissue disease 1.4.2 HIV infection 1.4.3 Portal hypertension 1.4.4 Congenital heart (...) pulmonary hypertension: results from aninternationalprospectiveregistry.Circulation2016;133(9):859–871. 2. Ishida K, Masuda M, Tanabe N, et al. Long-term outcome after pulmonary endarterectomy for chronic thromboembolic pulmon- ary hypertension. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2012;144(2):321–326. 3. Ende-Verhaar YM, Cannegieter SC, Vonk N, et al. Incidence of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after acute pulmonary embolism: a contemporary view of the published lit- erature. Eur Respir J. 2017;49

2019 Canadian Thoracic Society

5. Hsp70 Suppresses Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species and Preserves Pulmonary Microvascular Barrier Integrity Following Exposure to Bacterial Toxins Full Text available with Trip Pro

unacceptably high in part due to the release of bacterial toxins. Pneumolysin (PLY) is a cholesterol-dependent toxin that is produced by Streptococcus, and it is both necessary and sufficient for the development of the extensive pulmonary permeability edema that underlies acute lung injury. The mechanisms by which PLY disrupts the pulmonary endothelial barrier are not fully understood. Previously, we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the barrier destructive effects of PLY (...) Hsp70 Suppresses Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species and Preserves Pulmonary Microvascular Barrier Integrity Following Exposure to Bacterial Toxins Pneumonia is a leading cause of death in children and the elderly worldwide, accounting for 15% of all deaths of children under 5 years old. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common and aggressive cause of pneumonia and can also contribute to meningitis and sepsis. Despite the widespread use of antibiotics, mortality rates for pneumonia remain

2018 Frontiers in immunology

6. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Date of origin: 2014 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Imaging in the Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Clinical Condition: Imaging in the Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* X-ray chest 8 ? MRA chest without and with IV contrast 8 O CTA chest with IV contrast 7 ??? MRI chest without IV contrast 7 O US duplex Doppler subclavian artery and vein 6 O Digital (...) subtraction angiography upper extremity 5 ? CT chest without IV contrast 3 ??? MRA chest without IV contrast 2 O Rating Scale: 1,2,3 Usually not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation Level ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 2 Imaging in the Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome IMAGING IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME Expert Panels on Vascular Imaging, Neurologic Imaging and Thoracic Imaging: John M. Moriarty, MB, BCh 1 ; Dennis F. Bandyk, MD 2

2019 American College of Radiology

7. CRACKCast E159 – Inhaled Toxins

(asbestos). Therapy targets clinical manifestations of the inhaled toxins. See [Table 153-1] for a long list of common inhaled toxins. They can fall into different classifications: Irritants Simple asphyxiants Chemical asphyxiants (carbon monoxide; hydrogen cyanide; phosphine) 5 recognized categories: Simple asphyxiants (CO2; methane; nitrogen gas; nitrous oxide; noble gases) Displace oxygen Pulmonary irritants (e.g pharmacologic CS or chloroacetophenone gas – tear gas; ammonia; phosgene ozone) Direct (...) pulmonary irritation Smoke/soot Inhalation Irritation & O2 displacement Cyanide & Hydrogen Sulfide Cellular toxicity Inhibits oxidative phosphorylation Carbon Monoxide hypoxia All these agents have varying solubility and some may have profound systemic effects (hydrofluoric acid for example: very irritating, highly soluble and profound systemic effects). Toxic Progression goes a little something like this: Airway edema Bronchoconstriction Pneumonitis ARDS Resp Failure Death OR Inhalation of cellular

2018 CandiEM

8. Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes

Hypnotics (e.g. s) (and s) VII. Causes: Hypertension (Mnemonic=CTSCAN) See Supplements s s, s Nicotine VIII. Causes: Hypoventilation (Mnemonic=SLOW) Sedative hypnotics Liquor ( ) s Weed ( ) IX. Causes: Hyperventilation (Mnemonic=PANT) (PCP) or Pneumonitis (Chemical) ( s) Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema Toxic Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes." Click on the image (or right click) to open (...) Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Toxin Induced Vital

2018 FP Notebook

9. Pulmonary Edema, Cardiogenic (Diagnosis)

intubation), and barotrauma. Previous References Komiya K, Ishii H, Murakami J, et al. Comparison of chest computed tomography features in the acute phase of cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome on arrival at the emergency department. J Thorac Imaging . 2013 Sep. 28(5):322-8. . Ray P, Arthaud M, Birolleau S, et al. Comparison of brain natriuretic peptide and probrain natriuretic peptide in the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients aged 65 and older. J Am (...) shows interstitial pulmonary edema, cardiomegaly, and left pleural effusion presenting at an earlier stage of pulmonary edema. Lateral chest radiograph shows prominent interstitial edema and pleural effusions. of 5 Tables Contributor Information and Disclosures Author Ali A Sovari, MD, FACP, FACC Attending Physician, Cardiac Electrophysiologist, Cedars Sinai Medical Center and St John's Regional Medical Center Ali A Sovari, MD, FACP, FACC is a member of the following medical societies: , , American

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Pulmonary Edema, Cardiogenic (Overview)

intubation), and barotrauma. Previous References Komiya K, Ishii H, Murakami J, et al. Comparison of chest computed tomography features in the acute phase of cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome on arrival at the emergency department. J Thorac Imaging . 2013 Sep. 28(5):322-8. . Ray P, Arthaud M, Birolleau S, et al. Comparison of brain natriuretic peptide and probrain natriuretic peptide in the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients aged 65 and older. J Am (...) shows interstitial pulmonary edema, cardiomegaly, and left pleural effusion presenting at an earlier stage of pulmonary edema. Lateral chest radiograph shows prominent interstitial edema and pleural effusions. of 5 Tables Contributor Information and Disclosures Author Ali A Sovari, MD, FACP, FACC Attending Physician, Cardiac Electrophysiologist, Cedars Sinai Medical Center and St John's Regional Medical Center Ali A Sovari, MD, FACP, FACC is a member of the following medical societies: , , American

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Drug-Induced Liver Injury

Drug-Induced Liver Injury EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines: Drug-induced liver injury q European Association for the Study of the Liver ? Summary Idiosyncratic (unpredictable) drug-induced liver injury is one of the most challenging liver disorders faced by hepatologists, because of the myriad of drugs used in clinical practice, avail- able herbs and dietary supplements with hepatotoxic potential, the ability of the condition to present with a variety of clinical (...) andpathologicalphenotypesandthecurrentabsenceofspeci?c biomarkers. This makes the diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury an uncertain process, requiring a high degree of aware- ness of the condition and the careful exclusion of alternative aetiologies of liver disease. Idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity can be severe, leading to a particularly serious variety of acute liver failure for which no effective therapy has yet been developed. These Clinical Practice Guidelines summarize the available evi- dence on risk factors, diagnosis, management and risk

2019 European Association for the Study of the Liver

12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

are the complications? Disability and impaired quality of life — progressive breathlessness can lead to reduced mobility, and the person becoming increasingly housebound. Depression and anxiety — these common comorbidities of COPD and are often undiagnosed [ ]. Cor pulmonale (right heart failure secondary to lung disease) — caused by pulmonary hypertension as a consequence of hypoxia. Frequent chest infections. Secondary polycythaemia — overproduction of red blood cells due to hypoxia. Type 2 respiratory failure (...) if a person meets all of the following criteria: Age older than 35 years. Presence of a risk factor (for example current smoking, history of smoking, or an . Presence of typical symptoms such as: Exertional breathlessness. Chronic cough. Wheeze. Regular sputum production. Recurrent chest infections. Other symptoms that may be present include: Weight loss. Exercise intolerance. Ankle swelling. Fatigue. Absence of clinical features of asthma. For more information, see the section on Probability of asthma

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

13. Suspected Pulmonary Hypertension

. 45. Coulden R. State-of-the-art imaging techniques in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2006;3(7):577-583. 46. Fischer A, Misumi S, Curran-Everett D, et al. Pericardial abnormalities predict the presence of echocardiographically defined pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease. Chest. 2007;131(4):988-992. 47. Eksinar S, Gedevanishvili A, Koroglu M, et al. Extrinsic compression of the left main coronary artery (...) descending branch of pulmonary artery as a radiological sign of pulmonary hypertension. Thorax. 1970;25(1):91-96. 19. Woodruff WW, 3rd, Hoeck BE, Chitwood WR, Jr., Lyerly HK, Sabiston DC, Jr., Chen JT. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1985;144(4):681- 686. 20. Miniati M, Monti S, Airo E, et al. Accuracy of chest radiography in predicting pulmonary hypertension: a case-control study. Thromb Res. 2014;133(3):345-351. 21. Algeo S, Morrison D

2016 American College of Radiology

14. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: ATS/AHA Clinical Practice Guidelines

Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension. (Circulation. 2015;132:00-00. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000329 (...) .) Key Words: AHA Scientific Statements ? bronchopulmonary dysplasia ? congenital diaphragmatic hernia ? congenital heart disease ? genetics ? persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn ? sickle cell disease © 2015 by the American Heart Association, Inc., and the American Thoracic Society. Circulation is available at http://circ.ahajournals.org DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000329 †Deceased. The American Heart Association and the American Thoracic Society make every effort to avoid any actual

2015 American Thoracic Society

15. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension AHA/ATS Guideline 2037 Abstract—Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic (...) ? bronchopulmonary dysplasia ? congenital diaphragmatic hernia ? congenital heart disease ? genetics ? persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn ? sickle cell disease © 2015 by the American Heart Association, Inc., and the American Thoracic Society. Circulation is available at http://circ.ahajournals.org DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000329 †Deceased. The American Heart Association and the American Thoracic Society make every effort to avoid any actual or potential conflicts of interest that may arise

2015 American Heart Association

16. Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes

Hypnotics (e.g. s) (and s) VII. Causes: Hypertension (Mnemonic=CTSCAN) See Supplements s s, s Nicotine VIII. Causes: Hypoventilation (Mnemonic=SLOW) Sedative hypnotics Liquor ( ) s Weed ( ) IX. Causes: Hyperventilation (Mnemonic=PANT) (PCP) or Pneumonitis (Chemical) ( s) Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema Toxic Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes." Click on the image (or right click) to open (...) Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes Toxin Induced Vital Sign Changes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Toxin Induced Vital

2015 FP Notebook

17. Translational Medicine in Pulmonary-Renal Crosstalk: Therapeutic Targeting of p-Cresyl Sulfate Triggered Nonspecific ROS and Chemoattractants in Dyspneic Patients with Uremic Lung Injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Translational Medicine in Pulmonary-Renal Crosstalk: Therapeutic Targeting of p-Cresyl Sulfate Triggered Nonspecific ROS and Chemoattractants in Dyspneic Patients with Uremic Lung Injury Molecular mechanisms and pathological features of p-Cresyl sulfate (PCS)-induced uremic lung injury (ULI) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain unclear. We analyzed pleural effusions (PE) from CKD and non-CKD patients for uremic toxins, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and chemotactic cytokines. Correlations (...) , alveolar space, interstitial edema and capillary leakage increase in lung tissues of CKD-ULI mice, and NAC pretreatment ameliorates alveolar⁻capillary injury. PCS causes alveolar⁻capillary injury through triggering intracellular ROS, downstream prostaglandin pathways, cell death, and activating leukocytes to release multiplex chemoattractants and extracellular ROS. Thus PCS and nonspecific ROS serve as potential therapeutic targets.

2018 Journal of clinical medicine

18. Pharmacologic Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults

Pharmacologic Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults 449 journal.publications.chestnet.org Pha r maco logic Th erapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report Darren B. Taichman , MD, PhD, FCCP ; Joe Ornelas , MS ; Lorinda Chung , MD ; James R. Klinger , MD, FCCP ; Sandra Lewis , PhD ; Jess Mandel , MD ; Harold I. Palevsky , MD, FCCP ; Stuart Rich , MD, FCCP ; Namita Sood , MD, FCCP ; Erika B. Rosenzweig , MD ; Terence K. Trow , MD (...) the gaps in available knowledge regarding optimal pharmacotherapy for PAH. CHEST 2014; 146 ( 2 ): 449 - 475 ABBREVIATIONS : 6MWD 5 6-min walk distance ; AHRQ 5 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality ; ARIES 5 Ambrisentan in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo- Controlled, Multicenter, Efficacy Study ; BNP 5 brain natriuretic peptide ; CB 5 consensus-based ; CCB 5 calcium channel blocker ; CO 5 cardiac output ; COI 5 conflict of interest ; CTEPH 5 chronic t hr o m b o

2014 American College of Chest Physicians

19. Drug-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity (Overview)

disturb oxidant/antioxidant system homeostasis, resulting in pulmonary injury. Pulmonary vascular damage Drug-induced pulmonary vascular disease manifests clinically as acute pulmonary edema, diffuse interstitial lung disease, pulmonary vascular occlusion, and pulmonary hypertension or hemorrhage. The proposed mechanisms of lung vascular damage include the following: Increased microvascular hydrostatic pressure Increased permeability of the vascular endothelium Vascular occlusion by direct activation (...) show myelinoid inclusion bodies in the affected tissue. The process is reversible with discontinuation of the causative drug. Immune system–mediated injury Drugs can act as potential antigens, or haptens, inducing an immune cascade that can lead to the development of immune-mediated lung toxicity. Deposition of antigen-antibody complexes may trigger an inflammatory response, leading to pulmonary edema and interstitial lung disease. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus is an example of immune

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Drug-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity (Diagnosis)

disturb oxidant/antioxidant system homeostasis, resulting in pulmonary injury. Pulmonary vascular damage Drug-induced pulmonary vascular disease manifests clinically as acute pulmonary edema, diffuse interstitial lung disease, pulmonary vascular occlusion, and pulmonary hypertension or hemorrhage. The proposed mechanisms of lung vascular damage include the following: Increased microvascular hydrostatic pressure Increased permeability of the vascular endothelium Vascular occlusion by direct activation (...) show myelinoid inclusion bodies in the affected tissue. The process is reversible with discontinuation of the causative drug. Immune system–mediated injury Drugs can act as potential antigens, or haptens, inducing an immune cascade that can lead to the development of immune-mediated lung toxicity. Deposition of antigen-antibody complexes may trigger an inflammatory response, leading to pulmonary edema and interstitial lung disease. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus is an example of immune

2014 eMedicine.com

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