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Topical NSAID

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7581. What is the comparative systemic absorption rate of oral and topical NSAIDs?

What is the comparative systemic absorption rate of oral and topical NSAIDs? What is the comparative systemic absorption rate of oral and topical NSAIDs? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers (...) , patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com What is the comparative systemic absorption rate of oral and topical NSAIDs? Bandolier has published an article on the absorption of topical NSAIDs [1]. We recommend you read the article in full (see URL below) although it gives the following comment

2006 TRIP Answers

7582. Is there any evidence to support using any particular topical NSAID compared with another?

Is there any evidence to support using any particular topical NSAID compared with another? Is there any evidence to support using any particular topical NSAID compared with another? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches (...) types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Is there any evidence to support using any particular topical NSAID compared with another? The question lacked a clinical focus and therefore our answer reflects this broad nature. The recent secondary review articles we

2006 TRIP Answers

7583. Are there any guidelines / evidence based medicine on the use and monitoring of oral/topical NSAIDs in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure?

Are there any guidelines / evidence based medicine on the use and monitoring of oral/topical NSAIDs in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure? Are there any guidelines / evidence based medicine on the use and monitoring of oral/topical NSAIDs in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document (...) /topical NSAIDs in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure? On the question on NSAIDs in hypertension we found two DARE listed meta-analyses on the effects of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs on blood pressure(1)(2). The results of this most recent (1) states: "NSAIDs elevated supine mean blood-pressure by 5.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2, 8.7). NSAIDs had no significant effect on weight, creatinine clearance, plasma renin activity or daily urinary excretion of sodium

2003 TRIP Answers

7584. Is there any evidence to suggest oral or topical nsaid's are of use in acute, or prevention of, recurrent iritis?

Is there any evidence to suggest oral or topical nsaid's are of use in acute, or prevention of, recurrent iritis? Is there any evidence to suggest oral or topical nsaid's are of use in acute, or prevention of, recurrent iritis? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere (...) clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Is there any evidence to suggest oral or topical nsaid's are of use in acute, or prevention of, recurrent iritis? Clinical Evidence contains a chapter on acute anterior uveitis, which

2003 TRIP Answers

7585. What evidence is there for effectiveness of topical as opposed to oral NSAIDs in the treatment of medial collateral ligament strain of the knee?

What evidence is there for effectiveness of topical as opposed to oral NSAIDs in the treatment of medial collateral ligament strain of the knee? What evidence is there for effectiveness of topical as opposed to oral NSAIDs in the treatment of medial collateral ligament strain of the knee? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase (...) aim to deliver for every single search. As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com What evidence is there for effectiveness of topical as opposed to oral NSAIDs in the treatment

2005 TRIP Answers

7586. Are topical NSAIDs for OA clinically effective/cost-effective?

Are topical NSAIDs for OA clinically effective/cost-effective? Are topical NSAIDs for OA clinically effective/cost-effective? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box (...) leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Are topical NSAIDs for OA clinically effective/cost-effective? CKS (formerly PRODIGY) has a guideline on osteoarthritis [1]. This reports: “Topical NSAIDs may have a role in people who experience acute flare-ups of OA of the knees, fingers, and toes. - The evidence supports

2007 TRIP Answers

7587. Is there any evidence for differences in efficacy between topical NSAIDs? are there any studies comparing topical diclofenac (1%) gel with ibuprofen gel?

Is there any evidence for differences in efficacy between topical NSAIDs? are there any studies comparing topical diclofenac (1%) gel with ibuprofen gel? Is there any evidence for differences in efficacy between topical NSAIDs? are there any studies comparing topical diclofenac (1%) gel with ibuprofen gel? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document (...) ’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search. As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Is there any evidence for differences in efficacy between topical NSAIDs? are there any

2007 TRIP Answers

7588. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain: a meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Topical NSAIDs for acute pain: a meta-analysis. A previous systematic review reported that topical NSAIDs were effective in relieving pain in acute conditions like sprains and strains, with differences between individual drugs for efficacy. More trials, a better understanding of trial quality and bias, and a reclassification of certain drugs necessitate a new review.Studies were identified by searching electronic databases and writing to manufacturers. We selected randomised double blind trials (...) comparing topical NSAID with either placebo or another active treatment in adults with acute pain, and extracted dichotomous information approximating to a 50% reduction in pain at one week, together with details of adverse events and withdrawals. Relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat (NNT), and relative risk and number-needed-to-harm (NNH) were calculated, with sensitivity analyses where appropriate to investigate differences between individual drugs and aspects of trial design.Twenty-six double

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2004 BMC family practice

7589. Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain: systematic review and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain: systematic review and meta-analysis. : A previous systematic review reported that topical NSAIDs were effective in relieving pain in chronic conditions like osteoarthritis and tendinitis. More trials, a better understanding of trial quality and bias, and a reclassification of certain drugs necessitate a new review.Studies were identified by searching electronic databases, and writing to manufacturers. We identified randomised, double blind trials (...) comparing topical NSAID with either placebo or another active treatment, in adults with chronic pain. The primary outcome was a reduction in pain of approximately 50% at two weeks, and secondary outcomes were local and systemic adverse events and adverse event-related withdrawals. Relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat (NNT), and relative harm and number-needed-to-harm (NNH) were calculated, and the effects of trial quality, validity and size, outcome reported, and condition treated, were examined

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2004 BMC musculoskeletal disorders

7590. Best evidence topic report. Intravenous NSAID's in the management of renal colic. (PubMed)

Best evidence topic report. Intravenous NSAID's in the management of renal colic. A short cut review was carried out to establish whether intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are better than opioids at reducing pain in renal colic. 230 papers were found, of which five presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question, these have been meta-analysed by the Cochrane collaboration. The results of the meta-analysis are presented here. The author, date and country (...) of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results, and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that intravenous NSAID's should be the first-line treatment for patients presenting to the ED with acute renal colic.

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2006 Emergency Medicine Journal

7591. Topical NSAIDs in osteoarthritis: Best used for short periods during flare-ups in the disease (PubMed)

Topical NSAIDs in osteoarthritis: Best used for short periods during flare-ups in the disease 15297323 2004 09 14 2018 11 13 1756-1833 329 7461 2004 Aug 07 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Topical NSAIDs in osteoarthritis. 304-5 Cooper Cyrus C Jordan Kelsey M KM eng Editorial England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 0 Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal AIM IM Administration, Topical Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal administration & dosage Humans Osteoarthritis drug therapy 2004 8 7 5 0 2004 9

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2004 BMJ : British Medical Journal

7592. Topical ophthalmic NSAIDs reduce pain faster than placebo. (PubMed)

Topical ophthalmic NSAIDs reduce pain faster than placebo. Topical ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) relieve the pain of uncomplicated acute corneal abrasions faster than placebo eyedrops. The pain relief is small; whether the pain relief difference would be noticed by patients and how it compares with oral analgesics is unknown. Given the cost of topical NSAIDs, they are most useful for a select patient population: those who must return to work immediately, and those

2003 Journal of Family Practice Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7593. Effects of the topical treatment with NSAIDs on corneal sensitivity and ocular surface of Sjögren's syndrome patients. (PubMed)

Effects of the topical treatment with NSAIDs on corneal sensitivity and ocular surface of Sjögren's syndrome patients. To evaluate the effects of two NSAIDs on corneal sensitivity and ocular surface in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients.In all, 20 SS patients with epithelial corneal defects, were randomly divided into two groups: group 1 (10 females, age 35-63 years), treated with 0.1% indomethacin, one drop three times a day; group 2 (nine females, one male, age 38-65 years) treated with 0.1 (...) % diclofenac, at the same regimen. No systemic NSAIDs were allowed. Use of tear substitute was allowed. Corneal sensitivity, corneal staining, BUT, and ocular discomfort, were evaluated before and after 15, 30 days of treatment and 7 days after NSAID discontinuation. For statistical analysis, the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U test were used.Both groups showed at day 30 a statistically significant reduction of corneal sensitivity (P<0.05), although the diclofenac-treated group showed a statistically

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2005 Eye (London, England) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7594. Topical NSAIDS to control pain in clear corneal cataract extraction. (PubMed)

Topical NSAIDS to control pain in clear corneal cataract extraction. This study was conducted to assess the additive efficacy of ophthalmic topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with topical anesthesia in the control of pain associated with clear corneal cataract extraction. The patients who received three days of preoperative topical NSAIDs had a statistically significant decrease in their level of discomfort. We have previously shown that three days of preoperative NSAIDs can (...) reduce postoperative inflammation after cataract surgery. This study demonstrates that ophthalmic topical NSAIDs also decrease discomfort during surgery.

2004 Insight (American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7595. Choosing between NSAID and arnica for topical treatment of hand osteoarthritis in a randomised, double-blind study. (PubMed)

Choosing between NSAID and arnica for topical treatment of hand osteoarthritis in a randomised, double-blind study. The use of topical preparations for symptom relief is common in osteoarthritis. The effects of ibuprofen (5%) and arnica (50 g tincture/100 g, DER 1:20), as gel preparations in patients with radiologically confirmed and symptomatically active osteoarthritis of interphalangeal joints of hands, were evaluated in a randomised, double-blind study in 204 patients, to ascertain (...) differences in pain relief and hand function after 21 days' treatment. Diagnosis was according to established criteria; primary endpoints were pain intensity and hand function; statistical design was as per current regulatory guidelines for testing topical preparations. There were no differences between the two groups in pain and hand function improvements, or in any secondary end points evaluated. Adverse events were reported by six patients (6.1%) on ibuprofen and by five patients (4.8%) on arnica. Our

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2007 Rheumatology international Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7596. Are selective COX 2 inhibitors superior to traditional NSAIDs? : Rofecoxib did not provide unequivocal benefit over traditional NSAIDs (PubMed)

Are selective COX 2 inhibitors superior to traditional NSAIDs? : Rofecoxib did not provide unequivocal benefit over traditional NSAIDs 12130617 2002 08 05 2018 11 13 1756-1833 325 7356 2002 Jul 20 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Are selective COX 2 inhibitors superior to traditional NSAIDs? Rofecoxib did not provide unequivocal benefit over traditional NSAIDs. 161; author reply 161 Budenholzer Brian R BR eng Comment Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 0 Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal (...) 0 Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors 0 Lactones 0 Pyrazoles 0 Sulfonamides 0 Sulfones 0QTW8Z7MCR rofecoxib JCX84Q7J1L Celecoxib AIM IM BMJ. 2002 Jun 1;324(7349):1287-8 12039807 Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal adverse effects Arthritis, Rheumatoid drug therapy Celecoxib Clinical Trials as Topic Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors adverse effects Gastrointestinal Diseases chemically induced Humans Lactones adverse effects Pyrazoles Sulfonamides adverse effects Sulfones 2002 7 20 10 0 2002 8 6 10 1 2002 7 20

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2002 BMJ : British Medical Journal

7597. What evidence is there that topical NSAIDs are effective in relieving arthritic pain?

What evidence is there that topical NSAIDs are effective in relieving arthritic pain? What evidence is there that topical NSAIDs are effective in relieving arthritic pain? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches (...) types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com What evidence is there that topical NSAIDs are effective in relieving arthritic pain? Bandolier have a report "Topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic pain" based on a 1998 systematic review

2002 TRIP Answers

7598. Renal failure after topical use of NSAIDs. (PubMed)

Renal failure after topical use of NSAIDs. 8136681 1994 04 25 2018 11 13 0959-8138 308 6927 1994 Feb 19 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Renal failure after topical use of NSAIDs. 533 Fernando A H AH Thomas S S Temple R M RM Lee H A HA eng Case Reports Comment Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 0 Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal AIM IM BMJ. 1994 Jan 8;308(6921):110-1 8298379 Acute Kidney Injury chemically induced Aged Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal adverse effects Humans Male

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1994 BMJ : British Medical Journal

7599. Mitochondrial damage: a possible mechanism of the "topical" phase of NSAID induced injury to the rat intestine (PubMed)

Mitochondrial damage: a possible mechanism of the "topical" phase of NSAID induced injury to the rat intestine The "topical" effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seems to be an important cause of NSAID induced gastrointestinal damage.To examine the possible mechanism of the "topical" phase of damage in the small intestine.Electron microscopy and subcellular organelle marker enzyme studies were done in rat small intestine after oral administration of indomethacin (doses (...) or inhibition of electron transport underlies the "topical" phase of NSAID induced damage.Collectively, these studies suggest that NSAID induced changes in mitochondrial energy production may be an important component of the "topical" phase of damage induction.

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1997 Gut

7600. Soft tissue trauma: a randomised controlled trial of the topical application of felbinac, a new NSAID. (PubMed)

Soft tissue trauma: a randomised controlled trial of the topical application of felbinac, a new NSAID. Two hundred and thirty-one patients with acute soft tissue injuries were treated in a double-blind placebo-controlled study of felbinac (biphenylacetic acid) gel applied three times daily to the injured site. Those treated with felbinac had significantly greater improvement at Day 4 (p less than 0.001) and Day 7 (p less than 0.02) than those who received placebo. Patients' self-assessment (...) diary cards confirmed superiority of the active treatment as early as Day 2 of the study. Local skin reactions were few (three per cent), mild and recovered spontaneously. Felbinac is an effective management for acute soft tissue injuries and because of its topical application may be safer than oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of these conditions.

1989 The British journal of clinical practice Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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