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Topical NSAID

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21. Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs?

common in long-term NSAID use (up to 40%) [6] and the majority of these will never present clinically [1]. Guidelines around the topic are a little vague. NICE guidance documents are relatively assertive in recommending co-prescribing of PPIs with NSAIDs, especially for people with arthritis [7]. eTG Complete recommends that prophylaxis be considered for patients with “risk factors for increased gastrointestinal toxicity” [8]. In the absence of large randomised trials using clinical outcomes [2 (...) Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs? Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs? – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2017\/07\/mo2017-7-ee-cover.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jul 03 2017 Should PPIs be routinely co

2017 Morsels of Evidence

22. Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs?

common in long-term NSAID use (up to 40%) [6] and the majority of these will never present clinically [1]. Guidelines around the topic are a little vague. NICE guidance documents are relatively assertive in recommending co-prescribing of PPIs with NSAIDs, especially for people with arthritis [7]. eTG Complete recommends that prophylaxis be considered for patients with “risk factors for increased gastrointestinal toxicity” [8]. In the absence of large randomised trials using clinical outcomes [2 (...) Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs? Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs? – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2017\/07\/mo2017-7-ee-cover.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jul 03 2017 Should PPIs be routinely co

2017 Morsels of Evidence

23. NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections

NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2017\/06\/mo2017-5.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jun 09 2017 NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated (...) urinary tract infections By in , , Journal reference: Gagyor I, Bleidorn J, Kochen MM, Schmiemann G, Wegscheider K, Hummers-Pradier E. Ibuprofen versus fosfomycin for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: randomised controlled trial. Bmj 2015 Dec 23;351:h6544. Link: Published: December 2015 Evidence cookie says… NSAIDs should not be recommended as a first line treatment for uncomplicated UTIs in women compared with women who received empirical antibiotics, those who received regular

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2017 Morsels of Evidence

24. Topical NSAID

Topical NSAID Topical NSAID Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Topical NSAID Topical NSAID Aka: Topical NSAID (...) , Diclofenac Topical , Diclofenac Gel , Voltaren Emulgel , Diclofenac Solution , Pennsaid , Diclofenac Patch , Flector Patch From Related Chapters II. Preparations: Diclofenac Diclofenac Solution (Pennsaid 1.5%) Diclofenac Gel (Voltaren Gel 1.5%) Diclofenac Patch (Flector Patch) III. Preparations: Other NSAIDs Pharmacy may compound other s (e.g. ketoprofen, piroxicam, ) IV. Dosing: Diclofenac 1% gel applied to affected joints Measure gel on a dosing card and massage into affected area Two grams is 2.25

2018 FP Notebook

25. Musculoskeletal Strains and Sprains - Guidelines for Prescribing NSAIDs

, and/or counterirritant effects can be used as adjuncts to pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy. Rubefacients (ex: methylsalicylate ) produce heat sensation Camphor, menthol produce cooling sensation Methyl nicotinate causes vasodilation Capsaicin causes irritation without heat. Takes 2-4 weeks for significant analgesia, so not appropriate for acute pain. Patients should be advised not to use heating devices with topical counterirritants or to cover with a tight bandage. Topical NSAIDs - diclofenac Weak (...) evidence suggests that topical NSAIDs are effective in reducing pain caused by strains and sprains. Main role is use in osteoarthritis. Acetaminophen Indicated for selfcare treatment of mild to moderate pain. Instruct patient not to exceed recommended doses on package instructions. Should not be used for longer than 10 days in adults or 5 days in children without physician supervision. Little, if any, anti-inflammatory activity. OTC Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) - ASA, ibuprofen, naproxen

2017 medSask

26. Cochrane systematic review: Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo, with no increase in risk of adverse effects

Cochrane systematic review: Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo, with no increase in risk of adverse effects Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo, with no increase in risk of adverse effects | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about (...) how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo

2011 Evidence-Based Nursing

27. NSAIDs Versus Paracetamol Versus Paracetamol + NSAIDs in Traumatic Pain Management

NSAIDs Versus Paracetamol Versus Paracetamol + NSAIDs in Traumatic Pain Management NSAIDs Versus Paracetamol Versus Paracetamol + NSAIDs in Traumatic Pain Management - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before (...) adding more. NSAIDs Versus Paracetamol Versus Paracetamol + NSAIDs in Traumatic Pain Management The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03222518 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : July 19, 2017 Last

2017 Clinical Trials

28. NSAIDs in Sciatica NSAIDS IN SCIATICA

NSAIDs in Sciatica NSAIDS IN SCIATICA NSAIDs in Sciatica NSAIDS IN SCIATICA - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. NSAIDs in Sciatica NSAIDS IN SCIATICA (NIS) The safety and scientific validity (...) is an established term for pain radiating from the lower back or buttock into the leg, commonly caused by a disc herniation. Given their analgesic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action, NSAIDs (Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) have been, and are still being regarded as standard therapy for sciatica. However, very few randomised controlled trials of NSAIDs have been undertaken in sciatica, and no study has showed clinically meaningful effects as compared to placebo. Since NSAIDs involve the risk

2017 Clinical Trials

29. NSAIDs: Inflamed effects on inflammation?

RCTs (60 and 108 patients): 10,11 Diclofenac 150 mg/day and piroxicam 20 mg/day reduced swelling by ~25 mL (1.65%) more than placebo at three days. 10,11 Context: • Swelling should be assessed by volume (example water displacement) but frequently was not. • According to systematic reviews of topical NSAIDs and older RCTs, NSAIDs are effective for pain relief in acute injury. 4-6,8,12 o Topical NSAID example, 50% reduction in pain for acute musculoskeletal injury: Number Needed to Treat (NNT)=4 at 6 (...) NSAIDs: Inflamed effects on inflammation? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,000 family physicians, family medicine residents and medical students in Alberta. Established over fifty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca March 29, 2016 NSAIDs

2016 Tools for Practice

30. NSAIDs - prescribing issues

of an NSAID with low-dose aspirin should be avoided Short-acting NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen) should be used in preference to long-acting formulations (such as naproxen). For people at: High risk of GI adverse events — a COX-2 inhibitor should be prescribed with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Moderate risk of GI adverse events — a COX-2 inhibitor should be prescribed alone, or an NSAID plus a PPI. Low risk of GI events — a non-selective NSAID should be prescribed. Have I got the right topic? Have I got (...) the right topic? From age 1 month onwards. This CKS topic is largely based on the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) drug safety updates Diclofenac: new contraindications and warnings [ ], High-dose ibuprofen (≥2400mg/day): small increase in cardiovascular risk [ ], and Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): reminder on renal failure and impairment [ ], the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) review and position paper Cardiovascular safety of non-aspirin non-steroidal

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

31. Comparison of NSAID patch given as monotherapy and NSAID patch in combination with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, a heating pad, or topical capsaicin in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius: a pilot st (PubMed)

Comparison of NSAID patch given as monotherapy and NSAID patch in combination with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, a heating pad, or topical capsaicin in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius: a pilot st This study compared the therapeutic effect of monotherapy with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch vs an NSAID patch combined with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), a heating pad, or topical capsaicin (...) in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) of the upper trapezius.A randomized, single-blind, controlled study of combination therapy for patients with MPS was performed.Ninety-nine patients were randomly assigned to one of four different self-management methods for treatment: NSAID patch (N = 25), NSAID patch + TENS (N = 24), NSAID patch + heating pad (N = 25), and NSAID patch + topical capsaicin (N = 25). The NSAID patch used in this study was a ketoprofen patch. All treatment groups

2014 Pain Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

32. Comparison of NSAID patch given as monotherapy and NSAID patch in combination with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, a heating pad, or topical capsaicin in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius: a pilot st (PubMed)

Comparison of NSAID patch given as monotherapy and NSAID patch in combination with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, a heating pad, or topical capsaicin in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius: a pilot st This study compared the therapeutic effect of monotherapy with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch vs an NSAID patch combined with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), a heating pad, or topical capsaicin (...) in the treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) of the upper trapezius.A randomized, single-blind, controlled study of combination therapy for patients with MPS was performed.Ninety-nine patients were randomly assigned to one of four different self-management methods for treatment: NSAID patch (N = 25), NSAID patch + TENS (N = 24), NSAID patch + heating pad (N = 25), and NSAID patch + topical capsaicin (N = 25). The NSAID patch used in this study was a ketoprofen patch. All treatment groups

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2014 Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

33. Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews. (PubMed)

Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews. Topical analgesic drugs are used for a variety of painful conditions. Some are acute, typically strains or sprains, tendinopathy, or muscle aches. Others are chronic, typically osteoarthritis of hand or knee, or neuropathic pain.To provide an overview of the analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of topical analgesics (primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), salicylate (...) to 62)).We judged evidence of efficacy for other therapies as low or very low quality. Limited evidence of efficacy, potentially subject to publication bias, existed for topical preparations of ibuprofen gels and creams, unspecified diclofenac formulations and diclofenac gel other than Emulgel, indomethacin, and ketoprofen plaster in acute pain conditions, and for salicylate rubefacients for chronic pain conditions. Evidence for other interventions (other topical NSAIDs, topical salicylate in acute

2017 Cochrane

34. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for analgesia in traumatic corneal abrasions. (PubMed)

Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for analgesia in traumatic corneal abrasions. Traumatic corneal abrasions are relatively common and there is a lack of consensus about analgesia in their management. It is therefore important to document the clinical efficacy and safety profile of topical ophthalmic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the management of traumatic corneal abrasions.To identify and evaluate all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the use (...) of topical NSAIDs with placebo or any alternative analgesic interventions in adults with traumatic corneal abrasions (including corneal abrasions arising from foreign body removal), to reduce pain, and its effects on healing time.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 30 March 2017), Embase Ovid (1947 to 30 March 2017), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences

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2017 Cochrane

35. NSAID-induced corneal melt: Clinical importance, pathogenesis, and risk mitigation. (PubMed)

NSAID-induced corneal melt: Clinical importance, pathogenesis, and risk mitigation. Corneal melt, an ophthalmological condition in which corneal epithelium is lost accompanied by thinning of the corneal stroma, can lead to corneal perforation and cause loss of vision. Corneal melt is the most serious side effect of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), one of the topical treatments of ocular inflammation. NSAID-induced corneal melt (NICM), initially doubted, is real, having (...) been reported by multiple groups. NICM is induced by all but one of the approved ocular NSAIDs and occurs usually in patients whose cornea is compromised by ocular surgery, diabetes, or autoimmune diseases. Its true incidence, most likely low, remains unknown. NSAID dose and duration of treatment may be important for NICM. NICM appears to evolve in two stages: the epithelial stage-marked by a corneal epithelial defect, reduced eicosanoid levels, leukocyte infiltration, and matrix metalloproteinase

2019 Survey of Ophthalmology

36. Topical NSAID

Topical NSAID Topical NSAID Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Topical NSAID Topical NSAID Aka: Topical NSAID (...) , Diclofenac Topical , Diclofenac Gel , Voltaren Emulgel , Diclofenac Solution , Pennsaid , Diclofenac Patch , Flector Patch From Related Chapters II. Preparations: Diclofenac Diclofenac Solution (Pennsaid 1.5%) Diclofenac Gel (Voltaren Gel 1.5%) Diclofenac Patch (Flector Patch) III. Preparations: Other NSAIDs Pharmacy may compound other s (e.g. ketoprofen, piroxicam, ) IV. Dosing: Diclofenac 1% gel applied to affected joints Measure gel on a dosing card and massage into affected area Two grams is 2.25

2016 FP Notebook

37. Compounded Topical Diclofenac for the Treatment of Inflammation in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines

are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of topical diclofenac for the treatment of adults with inflammation? Key Message No relevant literature was identified regarding the use of prescription-strength compounded topical diclofenac for the treatment of adults with inflammation. Tags administration, cutaneous, administration, topical, anti-inflammatory agents, non-steroidal, diclofenac, gels, inflammation, inflammation mediators, ointments, rheumatic diseases, gels, Gel, NSAID, NSAIDs, anti (...) Compounded Topical Diclofenac for the Treatment of Inflammation in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Compounded Topical Diclofenac for the Treatment of Inflammation in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Compounded Topical Diclofenac for the Treatment of Inflammation in Adults: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Compounded Topical Diclofenac for the Treatment

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

38. For Patients Undergoing Open-Flap Debridement Surgery, There is No Significant Difference Between Dexamethasone and NSAIDs For Reducing Patient Perceived Pain

For Patients Undergoing Open-Flap Debridement Surgery, There is No Significant Difference Between Dexamethasone and NSAIDs For Reducing Patient Perceived Pain UTCAT2956, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title For Patients Undergoing Open-Flap Debridement Surgery, There is No Significant Difference Between Dexamethasone and NSAIDs For Reducing Patient Perceived Pain Clinical Question In adults undergoing (...) periodontal surgery, what is the effect of dexamethasone on patient perceived pain as compared to traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatories? Clinical Bottom Line Dexamethasone and NSAIDs are equally effective in reducing patient perceived pain following periodontal open flap debridement surgeries. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Steffens/2010 15 adult patients receiving periodontal surgery

2015 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

39. Efficacy and safety of topical NSAIDs in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys. (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of topical NSAIDs in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended in international and national guidelines as an early treatment option for the symptomatic management of knee and hand osteoarthritis (OA), and may be used ahead of oral NSAIDs due to their superior safety profile. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis (...) and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends topical NSAIDs for knee OA in addition to the pharmacological background of symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) and rescue analgesia with paracetamol and non-pharmacological treatment, if the patient is still symptomatic. Topical NSAIDs have a moderate effect on pain relief, with efficacy similar to that of oral NSAIDs, with the advantage of a better risk:benefit ratio. In real-life studies, topical and oral NSAIDs demonstrate

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2015 Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism

40. Strong topical steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor cocktail for treatment of cystoid macular edema (PubMed)

Strong topical steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor cocktail for treatment of cystoid macular edema To report the combination cocktail of strong steroid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops for treatment of cystoid macular edema.This is a retrospective case series of patients with cystoid macular edema managed with a topical combination of strong steroid (difluprednate), NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops. The patients were (...) followed with optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography.In our six cases, resolution of the cystic edema with improvement in visual acuity was achieved with the use of a combination cocktail of drops. Leakage on fluorescein angiography and cystic edema on optical coherence tomography both responded to treatment with the topical cocktail of drops.A topical cocktail of strong steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops are effective for managing cystoid macular edema. Further

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2015 International medical case reports journal

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