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Topical Corticosteroid

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121. Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS) Alone

: Treatment Official Title: Corticosteroid(CS) Injections for the Treatment of Common Upper Extremity Pathologies, With or Without Lidocaine Estimated Study Start Date : March 2019 Estimated Primary Completion Date : August 2021 Estimated Study Completion Date : August 2021 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: Treatment Group (corticosteroid injection plus lidocaine) Treatment (...) Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS) Alone Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS) Alone - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS

2018 Clinical Trials

122. A Study Comparing Corticosteroids Alone Versus Corticosteroids and Extracorporal Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease

Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard Risk Grade II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Estimated Study Start Date : October 1, 2018 Estimated Primary Completion Date : April 1, 2021 Estimated Study Completion Date : April 1, 2022 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: resources: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Experimental group corticosteroids + ECP Combination (...) A Study Comparing Corticosteroids Alone Versus Corticosteroids and Extracorporal Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease A Study Comparing Corticosteroids Alone Versus Corticosteroids and Extracorporal Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search

2018 Clinical Trials

123. Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Tezepelumab in Reducing Oral Corticosteroid Use in Adults With Oral Corticosteroid Dependent Asthma

Use in Adults With Oral Corticosteroid Dependent Asthma (SOURCE) Actual Study Start Date : March 5, 2018 Estimated Primary Completion Date : November 26, 2020 Estimated Study Completion Date : November 26, 2020 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Tezepelumab Tezepelumab subcutaneous injection Biological: Tezepelumab Tezepelumab subcutaneous injection Placebo Comparator: Placebo Placebo (...) Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Tezepelumab in Reducing Oral Corticosteroid Use in Adults With Oral Corticosteroid Dependent Asthma Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Tezepelumab in Reducing Oral Corticosteroid Use in Adults With Oral Corticosteroid Dependent Asthma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save

2018 Clinical Trials

124. Treating Atopic Dermatitis: Wet Wraps With Corticosteroids Versus Wet Wrap Therapy Without Corticosteroids

treatment, is usually reserved for children and adults with severe atopic dermatitis. The mainstay of treatment for atopic dermatitis has been emollients and topical corticosteroids. However, corticosteroids, especially when used long-term can have side effects that are a cause for concern. What additional benefits can be seen when adding a topical steroid to wet wrap therapy versus using emollient with wet wrap therapy alone? Methods: An exhaustive search of available medical literature was conducted (...) reduction in atopic dermatitis in the group treated with topical corticosteroid and wet wrap therapy vs. treatment with emollients and wet wrap therapy alone. An observational study with 8 participants observed that after one week the emollient only wet wrap therapy group showed only minor improvement while the steroid wet wrap group showed major improvement. Conclusion: Wet wrap therapy is effective in treating refractory atopic dermatitis and in combination with diluted fluticasone proprionate 0.05

2015 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

125. Corticosteroids and Prophylaxis. What complications should you try to prevent in patients on chronic corticosteroids?

. However, there is limited data on the subject largely because, despite much notoriety, there is limited data to even show that corticosteroids actually cause peptic ulcers in the first place. Initial reports of an association date as far back as 1951 [14]. Since then, a multitude of trials followed by meta-analyses have reviewed the topic. In 1976, a meta-analysis of over 3558 patients from 26 prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials found no difference in [15]. Another meta (...) complications of corticosteroids. Lastly is the topic of PCP prophylaxis. While there are clear data and guidelines for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the data is not as clear for other states of immunosuppresion. Although the first-line agent trimethoprim-sulfamethaxoazole (TMP-SMX) is very effective at preventing PCP, it comes with its own consequences including adverse drug reactions, cost, and risk of antibiotic resistance. As before, the risk of PCP is correlated with dose

2013 Clinical Correlations

126. Evaluation of topical human platelet lysate versus topical clobetasol in management of methotrexate-induced oral ulceration in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Randomized-controlled clinical trial. (PubMed)

Evaluation of topical human platelet lysate versus topical clobetasol in management of methotrexate-induced oral ulceration in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Randomized-controlled clinical trial. There is no mainstay protocol for management of Methotrexate-induced oral ulcers; commonly used protocols are cessation of Methotrexate, folic acid treatment, corticosteroids or combination. A new era of oral ulcers management is represented by platelet concentrates. The current study assessed (...) of oral ulcers.A statistically significant difference was detected between HPL and Clobetasol groups on comparing numerical rating scale, WHO mucositis scale, size and total number of oral ulcers throughout all visits. A considerable quick pain reduction and clinical improvement were noticed in HPL group compared to Clobetasol.Human platelet lysate has superior effect when compared to one of the most potent topical corticosteroids, Clobetasol Propionate, in reducing pain and clinical signs

2019 International immunopharmacology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

127. Saline irrigation and corticosteroid spray are effective first choice treatments for chronic sinusitis

SMD indicates improvement). Topical corticosteroid therapy improved overall symptom scores (SMD, -0.46 [95% CI, -0.65 to -0.27]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), improved polyp scores (SMD, -0.73 [95% CI, -1.0 to -0.46]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), and reduced polyp recurrence after surgery (relative risk, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.45 to 0.79]). Systemic corticosteroids and oral doxycycline (both for 3 weeks) reduced polyp size compared with placebo for 3 months after treatment (P < .001 (...) ). Leukotriene antagonists improved nasal symptoms compared with placebo in patients with nasal polyps (P < .01). Macrolide antibiotic for 3 months was associated with improved QOL at a single time point (24 weeks after therapy) compared with placebo for patients without polyps (SMD, -0.43 [95% CI, -0.82 to -0.05]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Evidence supports daily high-volume saline irrigation with topical corticosteroid therapy as a first-line therapy for chronic sinusitis. A short course of systemic

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

128. Moisturisers improve eczema symptoms and lessen the need for corticosteroids

score, mean difference [MD] -2.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.55 to -0.28; three studies, 276 participants). However, the change was not considered clinically significant. Fewer people using moisturisers had flares, 27% compared to 67% not using moisturisers over six month follow up (risk ratio [RR] 0.40, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.70; two studies, 87 participants). Time between flares was prolonged with moisturisers (median of 180 versus 30 days). Less topical corticosteroids were needed for people (...) to the SCORAD score, mean difference [MD] -2.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.55 to -0.28; three studies, 276 participants). However, the change was not considered clinically significant. Fewer people using moisturisers had flares, 27% compared to 67% not using moisturisers over six month follow up (risk ratio [RR] 0.40, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.70; two studies, 87 participants). Time between flares was prolonged with moisturisers (median of 180 versus 30 days). Less topical corticosteroids were needed

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

129. Saline irrigation and corticosteroid spray are effective first choice treatments for chronic sinusitis

SMD indicates improvement). Topical corticosteroid therapy improved overall symptom scores (SMD, -0.46 [95% CI, -0.65 to -0.27]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), improved polyp scores (SMD, -0.73 [95% CI, -1.0 to -0.46]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), and reduced polyp recurrence after surgery (relative risk, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.45 to 0.79]). Systemic corticosteroids and oral doxycycline (both for 3 weeks) reduced polyp size compared with placebo for 3 months after treatment (P < .001 (...) ). Leukotriene antagonists improved nasal symptoms compared with placebo in patients with nasal polyps (P < .01). Macrolide antibiotic for 3 months was associated with improved QOL at a single time point (24 weeks after therapy) compared with placebo for patients without polyps (SMD, -0.43 [95% CI, -0.82 to -0.05]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Evidence supports daily high-volume saline irrigation with topical corticosteroid therapy as a first-line therapy for chronic sinusitis. A short course of systemic

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

130. Corticosteroid injections provide only short term relief for rotator cuff disorders

the widespread use of corticosteroid injections, past trials have had mixed findings and their use continues to be debated. The last review on the topic was conducted in 2010, and since then four new trials have been published. What did this study do? This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 11 randomised controlled trials including 726 adults with rotator cuff disorders. One of the trials compared corticosteroid injection with placebo injection of salt water, and the remaining trials compared (...) to treat pain. Despite the widespread use of corticosteroid injections, past trials have had mixed findings and their use continues to be debated. The last review on the topic was conducted in 2010, and since then four new trials have been published. What did this study do? This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 11 randomised controlled trials including 726 adults with rotator cuff disorders. One of the trials compared corticosteroid injection with placebo injection of salt water

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

131. Different oral corticosteroid regimens for acute asthma. (PubMed)

Different oral corticosteroid regimens for acute asthma. Asthma is a common long-term breathing condition that affects approximately 300 million people worldwide. People with asthma may experience short-term worsening of their asthma symptoms; these episodes are often known as 'exacerbations', 'flare-ups', 'attacks' or 'acute asthma'. Oral steroids, which have a potent anti-inflammatory effect, are recommended for all but the most mild asthma exacerbations; they should be initiated promptly (...) . The most often prescribed oral steroids are prednisolone and dexamethasone, but current guidelines on dosing vary between countries, and often among different guideline producers within the same country. Despite their proven efficacy, use of steroids needs to be balanced against their potential to cause important adverse events. Evidence is somewhat limited regarding optimal dosing of oral steroids for asthma exacerbations to maximise recovery while minimising potential side effects, which is the topic

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2016 Cochrane

132. Corticosteroid implants for chronic non-infectious uveitis. (PubMed)

Corticosteroid implants for chronic non-infectious uveitis. Uveitis is a term used to describe a heterogeneous group of intraocular inflammatory diseases of the anterior, intermediate, and posterior uveal tract (iris, ciliary body, choroid). Uveitis is the fifth most common cause of vision loss in high-income countries, accounting for 5% to 20% of legal blindness, with the highest incidence of disease in the working-age population.Corticosteroids are the mainstay of acute treatment for all (...) anatomical subtypes of non-infectious uveitis and can be administered orally, topically with drops or ointments, by periocular (around the eye) or intravitreal (inside the eye) injection, or by surgical implantation.To determine the efficacy and safety of steroid implants in people with chronic non-infectious posterior uveitis, intermediate uveitis, and panuveitis.We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (Issue 10, 2015), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process

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2016 Cochrane

133. Infantile haemangioma: topical timolol

in the following situations: If the haemangioma is particularly large or affects areas where resolution may be incomplete such as around the nose, lips or ears. If the haemangioma is ulcerating. If the haemangioma is interfering with important functions or development of the senses, such as feeding, breathing, hearing or vision. Treatments, which are generally off-label, can include topical, oral, intravenous or intralesional corticosteroids, topical timolol, oral propranolol, laser treatment or surgery (...) areas where resolution may be incomplete such as around the nose, lips or ears. If the haemangioma is ulcerating. If the haemangioma is interfering with important functions or development of the senses, such as feeding, breathing, hearing or vision. Treatments, which are generally off-label, can include topical, oral, intravenous or intralesional corticosteroids, topical timolol, oral propranolol, laser treatment or surgery. Emollients, non-adherent dressings, pain relief and antibiotics may also

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

134. Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis

peels and becomes inflamed resembling a burn. This most often affects infants and children under 5 years old. Burns Folliculitis and Furuncles (Boils): Irritant folliculitis: caused by shaving, plucking, waxing, etc. Advise patient to stop hair removal procedure for three months after symptoms of folliculitis resolve. (Topical antibiotics are not effective.) Contact folliculitis: may be caused by petroleum jelly, lanolin, moisturizers, coal tar and overuse of topical corticosteroids. which may (...) Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis The skin has an effective

2017 medSask

135. Diaper Dermatitis, Irritant and Candidal - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antifungals and Hydrocortisone

Diaper Dermatitis, Irritant and Candidal - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antifungals and Hydrocortisone Diaper Dermatitis, Irritant and Candidal - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antifungals and Hydrocortisone - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Diaper Dermatitis, Irritant and Candidal - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antifungals and Hydrocortisone A rash occurring under the covered area of a diaper (...) to confirm diagnosis and symptoms / history suggestive of other conditions (See Differential Diagnosis ) which require further investigation and supervised therapy. Mild diaper dermatitis usually responds well to non-pharmaracological measures and regular use of topical barrier products. Topical hydrocortisone and antifungal products should be reserved for symptoms which are causing infant discomfort. Non-pharmacological measures Frequent diaper changes. Change the diaper up to every 2 hours, or any time

2017 medSask

136. Topical steroids better than vitamin D for treating scalp psoriasis

. In extreme cases it can cause hair loss, although this is usually only temporary. Topical treatments (creams and ointments for the skin) such as corticosteroids (steroids) and vitamin D are usually the first treatments tried, but applying them to the scalp is difficult because of hair on the head. It is also not clear which works best. This study aimed to help doctors and patients decide which of the wide variety of topical treatments available work best, and the type and frequency of any side effects (...) treatments were made: topical steroid alone versus vitamin D alone; combination therapy (corticosteroid and vitamin D therapy) versus steroid alone; combination therapy versus vitamin D alone. Trials concerning these three outcomes were rated as moderate or high quality, most lasted less than six months, and around half were carried out or sponsored by the manufacturer of the study medication. Sponsor involvement can bias results – in this case they can be more likely to find differences where

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

137. Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis "Resistant" to Topical Treatment Responds Rapidly to Topical Desoximetasone Spray. (PubMed)

Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis "Resistant" to Topical Treatment Responds Rapidly to Topical Desoximetasone Spray. Topical corticosteroids (TS) are a treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis (Ps). We assessed whether use of a TS under conditions designed to enhance adherence would be effective in patients who "failed" TS in the outpatient setting.Individuals with treatment-resistant Ps or AD were recruited (AD, n = 12; Ps, n = 12). Six participants were randomized to each of 2 groups

2018 Journal of cutaneous medicine and surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

138. The Efficacy of Topical Sesame Oil Versus Topical Triamcinolone on Oral Lichen Planus and Salivary Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarker [MDA]

to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03738176 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting First Posted : November 12, 2018 Last Update Posted : November 12, 2018 See Sponsor: Mona Taha Mohammed MD Information provided by (Responsible Party): Mona Taha Mohammed MD, Cairo University Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: use seseme oil and corticosteroid topically for two groups Condition or disease Intervention/treatment (...) Phase Oral Lichen Planus Drug: Sesame Oil Drug: triamcinolone in orabase Early Phase 1 Detailed Description: The enrolled patients will be divided randomly into two groups. Test group will receive topical sesame oil (3 times /day after eating) for a month. Control group will receive topical corticosteroid (3 times /day after eating) for a month. Assessment of the appearance score and severity of pain as well as the clinical parameter outcome will be done at baseline and at the end of two and four

2018 Clinical Trials

139. Impact of the Topical Ophthalmic Corticosteroid Loteprednol Etabonate on Intraocular Pressure (PubMed)

Impact of the Topical Ophthalmic Corticosteroid Loteprednol Etabonate on Intraocular Pressure Corticosteroids are a mainstay therapeutic option for the treatment of ocular inflammation. However, safety remains a concern for clinicians, particularly with long-term use. Though highly effective at suppressing inflammatory and allergic responses, topical ophthalmic corticosteroids carry an inherent risk of side effects, including elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), a risk factor (...) for the development of glaucoma. The corticosteroid loteprednol etabonate (LE) contains an ester rather than a ketone at the C-20 position, minimizing the potential for side effects, including IOP elevation. In early pivotal clinical trials of LE ophthalmic suspension for conjunctivitis (allergic, giant papillary), anterior uveitis, and post-operative inflammation, LE had minimal impact on IOP over short-term (<28 days) and long-term (≥28 days) use. Since then, new LE formulations-including a gel, an ointment

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2016 Advances in therapy

140. Spongiotic Trachyonychia Treated with Topical Corticosteroids Using the Paper Tape Occlusion Method (PubMed)

Spongiotic Trachyonychia Treated with Topical Corticosteroids Using the Paper Tape Occlusion Method 27843923 2018 11 13 2296-9195 2 1-2 2016 Sep Skin appendage disorders Skin Appendage Disord Spongiotic Trachyonychia Treated with Topical Corticosteroids Using the Paper Tape Occlusion Method. 49-51 Sakiyama Tomo T Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Chaya Ayaka A Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Shimizu Tomoko T (...) Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Ebihara Tamotsu T Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Saito Masataka M Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. eng Editorial 2016 05 21 Switzerland Skin Appendage Disord 101670617 2296-9160 Nail matrix Paper tape occlusion method Spongiosis Topical corticosteroids Trachyonychia 2016 02 08 2016 04 22 2016 11 16 6 0 2016 11 16 6 0 2016 11 16 6 1 ppublish

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2016 Skin appendage disorders

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