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Topical Corticosteroid

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121. A Study Comparing Corticosteroids Alone Versus Corticosteroids and Extracorporal Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease

Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard Risk Grade II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Estimated Study Start Date : October 1, 2018 Estimated Primary Completion Date : April 1, 2021 Estimated Study Completion Date : April 1, 2022 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: resources: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Experimental group corticosteroids + ECP Combination (...) A Study Comparing Corticosteroids Alone Versus Corticosteroids and Extracorporal Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease A Study Comparing Corticosteroids Alone Versus Corticosteroids and Extracorporal Photopheresis (ECP) as First-line Treatment of Standard II Acute Graft-versus-host Disease - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search

2018 Clinical Trials

122. Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS) Alone

: Treatment Official Title: Corticosteroid(CS) Injections for the Treatment of Common Upper Extremity Pathologies, With or Without Lidocaine Estimated Study Start Date : March 2019 Estimated Primary Completion Date : August 2021 Estimated Study Completion Date : August 2021 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: Treatment Group (corticosteroid injection plus lidocaine) Treatment (...) Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS) Alone Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS) Alone - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Corticosteroid(CS) + Lido or Corticosteroid(CS

2018 Clinical Trials

123. Comparison of Topical Latanoprost vs Topical Corticosteroid in Treatment of Localized Alopecia Areata

Comparison of Topical Latanoprost vs Topical Corticosteroid in Treatment of Localized Alopecia Areata Comparison of Topical Latanoprost vs Topical Corticosteroid in Treatment of Localized Alopecia Areata - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. Comparison of Topical Latanoprost vs Topical Corticosteroid in Treatment of Localized Alopecia Areata (COLA) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02350023 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : January 29, 2015 Last Update Posted

2015 Clinical Trials

124. A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients with lichen sclerosus treated with a standard protocol of class I topical corticosteroid and topical calcineurin inhibitor. (PubMed)

A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients with lichen sclerosus treated with a standard protocol of class I topical corticosteroid and topical calcineurin inhibitor. Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic, inflammatory condition of the skin, affecting primarily the anogenital region potentially leading to changes in vaginal architecture and vulvar squamous cell carcinoma. Current recommended treatment for LS is high-potency corticosteroids. Calcineurin inhibitors may also have a role.The (...) objective of this study is to introduce a treatment regimen involving clobetasol to induce remission, then tacrolimus to maintain remission in pediatric females with LS.As a retrospective case series, we report 14 pediatric females between 2 and 10 years of age with LS treated with clobetasol 0.05% topical ointment and systematically bridged to tacrolimus 0.1% topical ointment. For each patient, gender, age at disease onset, and clinical symptoms and features were noted. Time in weeks to 75% clearance

2015 Journal of Dermatological Treatment

125. Systemic and topical antibiotics for chronic rhinosinusitis. (PubMed)

Systemic and topical antibiotics for chronic rhinosinusitis. This review is one of six looking at the primary medical management options for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.Chronic rhinosinusitis is common and is characterised by inflammation of the lining of the nose and paranasal sinuses leading to nasal blockage, nasal discharge, facial pressure/pain and loss of sense of smell. The condition can occur with or without nasal polyps. Systemic and topical antibiotics are used with the aim (...) of eliminating infection in the short term (and some to reduce inflammation in the long term), in order to normalise nasal mucus and improve symptoms.To assess the effects of systemic and topical antibiotics in people with chronic rhinosinusitis.The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; CENTRAL (2015, Issue 8); MEDLINE; EMBASE; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 29 September 2015.Randomised

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2016 Cochrane

126. Topical treatments for scalp psoriasis. (PubMed)

for continuous outcomes. If studies were sufficiently homogeneous, we meta-analysed the data by using the random-effects model. Where it was not possible to calculate a point estimate for a single study, we described the data qualitatively. We also presented the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB).We categorised topical corticosteroids according to the German classification of corticosteroid potency as mild, moderate, high and very high.We included 59 RCTs with a total of 11,561 participants. Thirty (...) that the two-compound combination, steroids and vitamin D monotherapy were more effective than the vehicle. Steroids of moderate, high and very high potency tended to be similarly effective and well tolerated. There are inherent limitations in this review concerning the evaluation of salicylic acid, tar, dithranol or other topical treatments.The two-compound combination as well as corticosteroid monotherapy were more effective and safer than vitamin D monotherapy. Given the similar safety profile and only

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2016 Cochrane

127. Moisturisers improve eczema symptoms and lessen the need for corticosteroids

score, mean difference [MD] -2.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.55 to -0.28; three studies, 276 participants). However, the change was not considered clinically significant. Fewer people using moisturisers had flares, 27% compared to 67% not using moisturisers over six month follow up (risk ratio [RR] 0.40, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.70; two studies, 87 participants). Time between flares was prolonged with moisturisers (median of 180 versus 30 days). Less topical corticosteroids were needed for people (...) to the SCORAD score, mean difference [MD] -2.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.55 to -0.28; three studies, 276 participants). However, the change was not considered clinically significant. Fewer people using moisturisers had flares, 27% compared to 67% not using moisturisers over six month follow up (risk ratio [RR] 0.40, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.70; two studies, 87 participants). Time between flares was prolonged with moisturisers (median of 180 versus 30 days). Less topical corticosteroids were needed

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

128. Corticosteroid injections provide only short term relief for rotator cuff disorders

the widespread use of corticosteroid injections, past trials have had mixed findings and their use continues to be debated. The last review on the topic was conducted in 2010, and since then four new trials have been published. What did this study do? This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 11 randomised controlled trials including 726 adults with rotator cuff disorders. One of the trials compared corticosteroid injection with placebo injection of salt water, and the remaining trials compared (...) to treat pain. Despite the widespread use of corticosteroid injections, past trials have had mixed findings and their use continues to be debated. The last review on the topic was conducted in 2010, and since then four new trials have been published. What did this study do? This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 11 randomised controlled trials including 726 adults with rotator cuff disorders. One of the trials compared corticosteroid injection with placebo injection of salt water

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

129. Saline irrigation and corticosteroid spray are effective first choice treatments for chronic sinusitis

SMD indicates improvement). Topical corticosteroid therapy improved overall symptom scores (SMD, -0.46 [95% CI, -0.65 to -0.27]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), improved polyp scores (SMD, -0.73 [95% CI, -1.0 to -0.46]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), and reduced polyp recurrence after surgery (relative risk, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.45 to 0.79]). Systemic corticosteroids and oral doxycycline (both for 3 weeks) reduced polyp size compared with placebo for 3 months after treatment (P < .001 (...) ). Leukotriene antagonists improved nasal symptoms compared with placebo in patients with nasal polyps (P < .01). Macrolide antibiotic for 3 months was associated with improved QOL at a single time point (24 weeks after therapy) compared with placebo for patients without polyps (SMD, -0.43 [95% CI, -0.82 to -0.05]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Evidence supports daily high-volume saline irrigation with topical corticosteroid therapy as a first-line therapy for chronic sinusitis. A short course of systemic

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

130. Saline irrigation and corticosteroid spray are effective first choice treatments for chronic sinusitis

SMD indicates improvement). Topical corticosteroid therapy improved overall symptom scores (SMD, -0.46 [95% CI, -0.65 to -0.27]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), improved polyp scores (SMD, -0.73 [95% CI, -1.0 to -0.46]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), and reduced polyp recurrence after surgery (relative risk, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.45 to 0.79]). Systemic corticosteroids and oral doxycycline (both for 3 weeks) reduced polyp size compared with placebo for 3 months after treatment (P < .001 (...) ). Leukotriene antagonists improved nasal symptoms compared with placebo in patients with nasal polyps (P < .01). Macrolide antibiotic for 3 months was associated with improved QOL at a single time point (24 weeks after therapy) compared with placebo for patients without polyps (SMD, -0.43 [95% CI, -0.82 to -0.05]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Evidence supports daily high-volume saline irrigation with topical corticosteroid therapy as a first-line therapy for chronic sinusitis. A short course of systemic

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

131. Prescribing for rheumatological conditions in pregnancy and breastfeeding - Part I: standard and biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and corticosteroids.

Prescribing for rheumatological conditions in pregnancy and breastfeeding - Part I: standard and biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and corticosteroids. We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. BSR and BHPR guideline on prescribing drugs in pregnancy and breastfeeding—Part I: standard and biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (...) and corticosteroids | Rheumatology | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article navigation September 2016 Article Contents Article Navigation BSR and BHPR guideline on prescribing drugs in pregnancy and breastfeeding—Part I: standard and biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and corticosteroids Julia Flint 1 Centre for Rheumatology Research, UCL Division of Medicine

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2016 British Society for Rheumatology

132. Corticosteroid treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy

Corticosteroid treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy Practice guideline update summary: Corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy | Neurology Advertisement Search for this keyword Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword The most widely read and highly cited peer-reviewed neurology journal Share February 02, 2016 ; 86 (5) Special Article Practice guideline update summary: Corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy Report of the Guideline Development (...) .), Loma Linda University Medical Center, CA; and Departments of Pediatric and Neurology/Neurosurgery (M.O.), McGill University, Montréal, Canada. Practice guideline update summary: Corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy David Gloss , Richard T. Moxley , Stephen Ashwal , Maryam Oskoui Neurology Feb 2016, 86 (5) 465-472; DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000002337 Citation Manager Formats Make Comment See Comments Downloads 5504 Share Abstract Objective: To update the 2005 American Academy

2016 American Academy of Neurology

133. Topical steroids better than vitamin D for treating scalp psoriasis

. In extreme cases it can cause hair loss, although this is usually only temporary. Topical treatments (creams and ointments for the skin) such as corticosteroids (steroids) and vitamin D are usually the first treatments tried, but applying them to the scalp is difficult because of hair on the head. It is also not clear which works best. This study aimed to help doctors and patients decide which of the wide variety of topical treatments available work best, and the type and frequency of any side effects (...) treatments were made: topical steroid alone versus vitamin D alone; combination therapy (corticosteroid and vitamin D therapy) versus steroid alone; combination therapy versus vitamin D alone. Trials concerning these three outcomes were rated as moderate or high quality, most lasted less than six months, and around half were carried out or sponsored by the manufacturer of the study medication. Sponsor involvement can bias results – in this case they can be more likely to find differences where

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

134. Treating Atopic Dermatitis: Wet Wraps With Corticosteroids Versus Wet Wrap Therapy Without Corticosteroids

treatment, is usually reserved for children and adults with severe atopic dermatitis. The mainstay of treatment for atopic dermatitis has been emollients and topical corticosteroids. However, corticosteroids, especially when used long-term can have side effects that are a cause for concern. What additional benefits can be seen when adding a topical steroid to wet wrap therapy versus using emollient with wet wrap therapy alone? Methods: An exhaustive search of available medical literature was conducted (...) reduction in atopic dermatitis in the group treated with topical corticosteroid and wet wrap therapy vs. treatment with emollients and wet wrap therapy alone. An observational study with 8 participants observed that after one week the emollient only wet wrap therapy group showed only minor improvement while the steroid wet wrap group showed major improvement. Conclusion: Wet wrap therapy is effective in treating refractory atopic dermatitis and in combination with diluted fluticasone proprionate 0.05

2015 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

135. Corticosteroid-Related Adverse Events Systematically Increase with Corticosteroid Dose in Noninfectious Intermediate, Posterior, or Panuveitis: Post Hoc Analyses from the VISUAL-1 and VISUAL-2 Trials. (PubMed)

was estimated controlling for time-dependent corticosteroid dose, age, sex, prior oral corticosteroid dose, prior topical corticosteroid use, and concomitant immunosuppressive drug use. Only patients randomized to placebo were considered.The primary outcome measure was the frequency of AEs.The incidence rates of corticosteroid-related AEs among placebo patients during the prednisone treatment period in VISUAL-1 was statistically higher than after discontinuation (454.2 per 100 patient-years [PY] vs. 36.1 (...) Corticosteroid-Related Adverse Events Systematically Increase with Corticosteroid Dose in Noninfectious Intermediate, Posterior, or Panuveitis: Post Hoc Analyses from the VISUAL-1 and VISUAL-2 Trials. Chronic use of corticosteroids for the treatment of uveitis has been linked with drug-associated toxicity and adverse events (AEs). This study examines the association between corticosteroid dosage and incidence rates of corticosteroid-related AEs.A post hoc analysis of the VISUAL-1 and VISUAL-2

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2017 Ophthalmology

136. Particulate Corticosteroid Versus Non-particulate Corticosteroid for Sacroiliac Joint Injection

(Participant) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Randomized Prospective Study of Particulate Corticosteroid Versus Non-particulate Corticosteroid for Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection Actual Study Start Date : September 14, 2017 Estimated Primary Completion Date : September 2020 Estimated Study Completion Date : September 2020 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental (...) Particulate Corticosteroid Versus Non-particulate Corticosteroid for Sacroiliac Joint Injection Particulate Corticosteroid Versus Non-particulate Corticosteroid for Sacroiliac Joint Injection - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2017 Clinical Trials

137. Corticosteroids and Prophylaxis. What complications should you try to prevent in patients on chronic corticosteroids?

. However, there is limited data on the subject largely because, despite much notoriety, there is limited data to even show that corticosteroids actually cause peptic ulcers in the first place. Initial reports of an association date as far back as 1951 [14]. Since then, a multitude of trials followed by meta-analyses have reviewed the topic. In 1976, a meta-analysis of over 3558 patients from 26 prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials found no difference in [15]. Another meta (...) complications of corticosteroids. Lastly is the topic of PCP prophylaxis. While there are clear data and guidelines for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the data is not as clear for other states of immunosuppresion. Although the first-line agent trimethoprim-sulfamethaxoazole (TMP-SMX) is very effective at preventing PCP, it comes with its own consequences including adverse drug reactions, cost, and risk of antibiotic resistance. As before, the risk of PCP is correlated with dose

2013 Clinical Correlations

138. The Efficacy of Topical Sesame Oil Versus Topical Triamcinolone on Oral Lichen Planus and Salivary Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarker [MDA]

to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03738176 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting First Posted : November 12, 2018 Last Update Posted : November 12, 2018 See Sponsor: Mona Taha Mohammed MD Information provided by (Responsible Party): Mona Taha Mohammed MD, Cairo University Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: use seseme oil and corticosteroid topically for two groups Condition or disease Intervention/treatment (...) Phase Oral Lichen Planus Drug: Sesame Oil Drug: triamcinolone in orabase Early Phase 1 Detailed Description: The enrolled patients will be divided randomly into two groups. Test group will receive topical sesame oil (3 times /day after eating) for a month. Control group will receive topical corticosteroid (3 times /day after eating) for a month. Assessment of the appearance score and severity of pain as well as the clinical parameter outcome will be done at baseline and at the end of two and four

2018 Clinical Trials

139. Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis "Resistant" to Topical Treatment Responds Rapidly to Topical Desoximetasone Spray. (PubMed)

Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis "Resistant" to Topical Treatment Responds Rapidly to Topical Desoximetasone Spray. Topical corticosteroids (TS) are a treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis (Ps). We assessed whether use of a TS under conditions designed to enhance adherence would be effective in patients who "failed" TS in the outpatient setting.Individuals with treatment-resistant Ps or AD were recruited (AD, n = 12; Ps, n = 12). Six participants were randomized to each of 2 groups

2018 Journal of cutaneous medicine and surgery

140. Safety of topical corticosteroids in pregnancy. (PubMed)

Safety of topical corticosteroids in pregnancy. Topical corticosteroids are the most frequently prescribed dermatological treatment and are frequently used by pregnant women with skin conditions. However, little is known about their safety in pregnancy.To assess the effects of topical corticosteroids on pregnancy outcomes.On 5th May 2009 we searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009 (...) , Issue 2), MEDLINE (from 2003), and EMBASE (from 2005). We searched LILACS, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, SCI-EXPANDED, BIOSIS Previews, Conference Papers Index, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science from inception to May 2009. We scanned the bibliographies of the included studies, published reviews, and articles that had cited the included studies. Pharmaceutical companies that have introduced an original topical corticosteroid product were contacted.Randomised controlled trials

2009 Cochrane

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