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Topical Corticosteroid

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2. Assessing the response of morphea and limited scleroderma to tranilast: a small prospective study comparing topical corticosteroids to a combination of topical corticosteroids and tranilast (Full text)

Assessing the response of morphea and limited scleroderma to tranilast: a small prospective study comparing topical corticosteroids to a combination of topical corticosteroids and tranilast Scleroderma is traditionally managed with immunomodulatory agents such as methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. There are anecdotal reports for, and theoretical reasons why, the anti-fibrotic agent tranilast may provide an additional treatment modality.The objective of the current study (...) was to demonstrate if the addition of topical tranilast to an established regime resulted in an improvement in the Localized Scleroderma Assessment Tool (LoSCAT) and modified Rodnan score.A small double-blinded randomized prospective study of 11 pairs of treatment sites in four patients; three with morphea and one with limited scleroderma was performed. All patients continued with their prescribed treatment and applied 0.1% betamethasone valerate in PCCA PracaSil™ (B) to the control site with 0.1% betamethasone

2018 Clinical, cosmetic and investigational dermatology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3. Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03535233 Recruitment Status

2018 Clinical Trials

4. Atopic Dermatitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Corticosteroids (Full text)

Atopic Dermatitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Corticosteroids Atopic Dermatitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Corticosteroids - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Atopic Dermatitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Corticosteroids Chronic, recurring, inflammatory disorder of the skin. Often referred to as eczema, but they are not interchangeable terms: Eczema is a group of skin conditions, which (...) appropriate. Symptoms are interfering with quality of life and sleep Nummular discoid eczema - small round plaques of small papules and blisters, usually on trunk or extremities - recommended treatment is potent topical corticosteroids. Large areas of skin are involved (> 30 % of body surface area) - risk of systemic absorption of corticosteroid if large areas of skin are being treated. Pediatric patients may be at higher risk of topical corticosteroid-induced HPA axis suppression and Cushing's syndrome

2017 medSask

5. Topical Corticosteroids Improve Healing Time in Patients with Aphthous Ulcers

Topical Corticosteroids Improve Healing Time in Patients with Aphthous Ulcers UTCAT3273, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Topical Corticosteroids Improve Healing Time in Patients with Aphthous Ulcers Clinical Question In patients with aphthous ulcers, does treatment with topical corticosteroids, as compared to a placebo, improve healing time of the ulcers? Clinical Bottom Line Patients treated (...) with topical corticosteroids show an improved ulcer healing time. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Staines/2015 8 studies/583 patients Systematic review of randomized trials Key results 5 of the 8 studies in which ulcer duration was evaluated found that application of topical corticosteroids decreased the time required for the ulcer to heal (P Evidence Search “recurrent” AND “aphthous

2017 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

6. Successful management of severe post-LASIK Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis with topical amikacin and linezolid, flap ablation, and topical corticosteroids. (PubMed)

Successful management of severe post-LASIK Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis with topical amikacin and linezolid, flap ablation, and topical corticosteroids. This is a case report of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis managed with combined topical amikacin and linezolid, flap amputation, and corticosteroids. A 34-year-old woman presented with a corneal interface infiltrate 3 weeks after LASIK. Cultures isolated mycobacteria (...) of the inflammation within 1 week. Identification of the mycobacterial pathogen and its susceptibilities is essential given the possibility of multidrug resistance. Topical linezolid can be effective in susceptible species. Corticosteroids can be helpful in cases with severe inflammation.Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.

2019 Journal of cataract and refractive surgery

7. Topical treatments in atopic dermatitis: unexpectedly low use of emollients; use of topical corticosteroid is higher in juvenile patients, higher in male vs females, and shows independent associations with asthma and depression. (PubMed)

Topical treatments in atopic dermatitis: unexpectedly low use of emollients; use of topical corticosteroid is higher in juvenile patients, higher in male vs females, and shows independent associations with asthma and depression. Despite decades of use,the actual amounts of topical corticosteroids (TCS) and emollients used in moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) under real-world conditions are unknown. Thus, it remains unclear if inadequate use is widespread.To quantify the use of TCS (...) contributing to AD severity. TCS use does not exceed current guidelines. Accurate quantification of topical treatments provides a widely accessible strategy to measure real-world impact of novel AD treatments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

2019 British Journal of Dermatology

8. Comparative safety and efficacy of topical mometasone furoate with other topical corticosteroids. (Full text)

Comparative safety and efficacy of topical mometasone furoate with other topical corticosteroids. Derivatives of hydrocortisone, such as mometasone furoate, a (2') furoate-17 ester with chlorine substitutions at positions 9 and 21, have been designed to improve efficacy and reduce the incidence of adverse effects. An extensive literature search of MEDLINE, Embase and other databases was conducted to review the safety and efficacy of various formulations of topical mometasone furoate. Mometasone (...) biotransformation, and consequently has no significant effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The molecular biotransformation of mometasone furoate in the skin results in a lower affinity with dermal cells than epidermal cells, which contributes to its low atrophogenicity. Sensitisation to mometasone furoate is low. Overall, mometasone furoate is a highly efficacious potent corticosteroid with a low risk of both local and systemic adverse effects.© 2018 Ego Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd. Australasian

2018 Australasian Journal of Dermatology

9. Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes

Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes - NICE CKS Share Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes: Summary Corticosteroids are synthetic analogues of the natural hormones that are produced by the adrenal cortex. Local corticosteroids are predominantly glucocorticoids. They have 4 main effects: Anti-inflammatory. Immunosuppressive. Anti-proliferative (anti-mitotic). Vasoconstrictive. Topical corticosteroids exert these effects (...) of treatment with topical corticosteroids depends on the diagnosis. Generally, very potent corticosteroids should not be used for more than 3 weeks continuously. If treatment is indicated for longer, intermittent dosing and gradual tapering of the dose should be considered, and more frequent monitoring for adverse effects should be arranged. Less potent topical corticosteroids can be used for up to 3 months, except in intertriginous areas, on the face and neck, or under occlusion. Abrupt withdrawal

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys. (PubMed)

Topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys. Until recently, phimosis has been treated surgically by circumcision or prepuceplasty; however, recent reports of non-invasive treatment using topical corticosteroids applied for four to eight weeks have been favourable. The efficacy and safety of topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys has not been previously systematically reviewed.We aimed to 1) compare the effectiveness of the use of topical corticosteroid ointment applied (...) to the distal stenotic portion of the prepuce in the resolution of phimosis in boys compared with the use of placebo or no treatment, and 2) determine the rate of partial resolution (improvement) of phimosis, rate of re-stenosis after initial resolution or improvement of phimosis, and the rate of adverse events of topical corticosteroid treatment in boys with phimosis.We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant

2014 Cochrane

11. Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. (Full text)

Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Bacterial keratitis is a serious ocular infectious disease that can lead to severe visual disability. Risk factors for bacterial corneal infection include contact lens wear, ocular surface disease, corneal trauma, and previous ocular or eyelid surgery. Topical antibiotics constitute the mainstay of treatment in cases of bacterial keratitis, whereas the use of topical corticosteroids as an adjunctive therapy to antibiotics (...) remains controversial. Topical corticosteroids are usually used to control inflammation using the smallest amount of the drug. Their use requires optimal timing, concomitant antibiotics, and careful follow-up.The objective of the review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Secondary objectives included evaluation of health economic outcomes and quality of life outcomes.We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes

2014 Cochrane

12. Topical medium potency corticosteroids compared to PUVA (psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation) for the treatment of pompholyx in adult patients

Topical medium potency corticosteroids compared to PUVA (psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation) for the treatment of pompholyx in adult patients Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

13. Different strategies for using topical corticosteroids in people with eczema [Cochrane protocol]

Different strategies for using topical corticosteroids in people with eczema [Cochrane protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external

2019 PROSPERO

14. Emollients and topical corticosteroids for treatment of atopic dermatitis: a systematic review of guidelines

Emollients and topical corticosteroids for treatment of atopic dermatitis: a systematic review of guidelines Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

15. Systematic review: Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis

Systematic review: Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) , please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

16. Different potencies of topical corticosteroids for a better treatment strategy in children with atopic dermatitis (the Rotterdam Eczema study): protocol for an observational cohort study with an embedded randomised open-label controlled trial. (Full text)

Different potencies of topical corticosteroids for a better treatment strategy in children with atopic dermatitis (the Rotterdam Eczema study): protocol for an observational cohort study with an embedded randomised open-label controlled trial. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) of different potencies are the main treatment to control atopic dermatitis (AD). The Dutch guideline on AD for general practitioners (GPs) recommends a stepwise approach in which treatment steps are tailored to the severity

2019 BMJ open Controlled trial quality: predicted high

17. Topical Corticosteroid Phobia Among Healthcare Professionals Using the TOPICOP Score. (Full text)

Topical Corticosteroid Phobia Among Healthcare Professionals Using the TOPICOP Score. Corticophobia is a major problem in adherence to therapy. This study examined corticophobia among healthcare professionals using the Topical Corticosteroid Phobia (TOPICOP) questionnaire. The TOPICOP questionnaire was adapted for use with professionals (TOPICOP-P). Four groups of professionals: pharmacists, paediatricians, general practitioners and dermatologists were observed. The mean global TOPICOP score (...) knowledge of topical corticosteroids. In order to improve patient compliance, re-education of healthcare providers is suggested.

2019 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

18. Treatment responses in patients with vitiligo to very potent topical corticosteroids combined with vitaminotherapy in Madagascar. (PubMed)

Treatment responses in patients with vitiligo to very potent topical corticosteroids combined with vitaminotherapy in Madagascar. Vitiligo is a refractory disease in which treatment modalities are not yet established. We aim to assess results obtained 10 years after the initiation of a therapeutic protocol which combines very potent topical corticosteroids (TCS), vitaminotherapy (B12 and C), and suppression of microtraumas in the management of nonsegmental vitiligo in Madagascar.It

2019 International Journal of Dermatology

19. Association Between Topical Corticosteroid Use and Type 2 Diabetes in Two European Population-Based Adult Cohorts. (Full text)

Association Between Topical Corticosteroid Use and Type 2 Diabetes in Two European Population-Based Adult Cohorts. Topical corticosteroids (CSs) are commonly used to treat inflammatory skin conditions including eczema and psoriasis. Although topical CS package inserts describe hyperglycemia and glycosuria as adverse drug reactions, it is unclear whether topical CS use in real life is also associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D).Two matched case-control studies and one cohort (...) study were conducted using routinely collected health care data from Denmark and the U.K. A total of 115,218 and 54,944 adults were identified as case subjects with new-onset T2D in the Danish and U.K. case-control study, respectively. For the Danish cohort study, 2,689,473 adults were included. The main exposure was topical CSs, and the outcome was incident T2D.Topical CS was significantly associated with T2D in the Danish (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.35 [95% CI 1.33-1.38]) and U.K. (adjusted

2019 Diabetes Care

20. Systemic allergic dermatitis after patch testing with dibucaine and topical corticosteroids. (PubMed)

Systemic allergic dermatitis after patch testing with dibucaine and topical corticosteroids. Systemic allergic dermatitis arises if an individual sensitised via the skin is exposed to the same allergen or a cross reacting allergen by a different route1 . It is rarely elicited by cutaneous contact with an allergen2 , although transepidermal rechallenge has been reported3 . We report a case of systemic allergic dermatitis caused by patch testing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

2019 Contact Dermatitis

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