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Topical Analgesic

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161. The effectiveness of topical comfrey for the management of back pain: a systematic review

The effectiveness of topical comfrey for the management of back pain: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites (...) . No control group 5. Combination therapy or contamination 6. Not about analgesics used in the clinic Full text-screening: As above, with the addition of: 7. No relevant outcome measure reported ">Prioritise the exclusion criteria Example: Two reviewers will independently extract data from each article. We first try to extract numerical data from tables, text or figures. If these are not reported, we will extract data from graphs using digital ruler software. In case data are not reported or unclear, we

2019 PROSPERO

162. Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients

. Bratanow); and the National Institute of Drug Abuse (M.A. Huestis). Prior to a systematic literature search, the LMPG committee defined all the key questions that would be addressed in the guideline using the PICO(TS) strategy for con- struction of the questions. PICO(TS) stands for the (P)atient pop- ulation, (I)ntervention, (C)omparator, (O)utcome, (T)ime period, and (S)etting. In this guideline, the patient population was acute and/or chronic pain management patients, and the interventions were (...) -based expert opinions. Background The use of opioids for pain management has been broadly ac- cepted by regulatory bodies, professional organizations, and cli- nicians. Compliance monitoring is viewed as necessary for safe opioid prescribing, and chronic opioid prescribing includes “con- tracts” or treatment agreements, periodic urine drug testing, and random pill counts. The magnitude of prescription opioid abuse has grown over the last decade, leading the Centers for Disease Control (CDC

2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine

163. CRACKCast E194 – Pain Management

Edition Chapter in Pain Management Allodynia – pain from a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain Amnesia/amnestic – an agent that suppresses the formation of memories Local anesthesia – creates an area of insensibility to pain by injection of a local anesthetic agent Analgesiarelief from pain Hypnotic – agent that promotes the onset of sleep Narcotic – term with legal implications describing opioid agents together with various central nervous system depressants drugs of abuse Nociceptor (...) with on a daily basis in the ED. This is something that we need to be really damn good at managing. As we mentioned above, acute pain is an emergent condition for the patient that requires rapid assessment and management. Tylenol, NSAIDS, and opioids for the basis for ED management of acute pain. Additionally, we have access to a whole armamentarium of local and topical anesthetics, and we need to be well-versed in their use. Core Questions: [1] Define the following terms : See table 3.2 in Rosen’s 9 th

2018 CandiEM

164. Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU Full Text available with Trip Pro

instability, respiratory compromise, immunosuppression) in critically ill adults; implementation of assessment-driven and standardized pain management protocols improves ICU outcomes and clinical practice ( , ). Carefully titrated analgesic dosing is important when balancing the benefits versus potential risks of opioid exposure ( ). In this guideline section, we address three actionable questions and two descriptive questions related to the pain experience of critically ill adults (see prioritized topic (...) a planned procedure in patients unable to self-report pain ; 5) identification of biomarkers associated with pain ; 6) conduct of clinical trials of pain management interventions during procedures; and 7) investigation of the relationship among opioid effectiveness, opioid tolerance, opioid-related hyperalgesia, and procedural pain ( ). | Assessment Question: What are the most reliable and valid pain assessment methods to use in critically ill adults? | Self-Report Scales. Ungraded Statements

2018 Society of Critical Care Medicine

165. Nabilone for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

analgesics, in patients with cancer or non-cancer pain, the included literature had several limitations. The findings, therefore, should be interpreted with caution. No evidence-based guidelines provided recommendations on the use of nabilone for chronic pain management. Tags chronic pain, other miscellaneous topics Files Rapid Response Summary with Critical Appraisal Published : August 9, 2017 Related Content Follow us: © 2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Get our newsletter: (...) Nabilone for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Nabilone for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Nabilone for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Nabilone for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: August 9, 2017 Project Number: RC0906-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

166. Postpartum Pain Management

analgesics that have an antiinflammatory effect can be used, if needed. Management of nipple pain begins with a careful assessment of infant latch and, if the woman is express- ing milk, the fit of pump flanges. Although anhydrous lanolin has historically been recommended for treatment ofnipplepainortrauma,asystematicreviewdidnotfind evidence that any specific topical treatmentis superior to doing nothing or applying breast milk (9). Of note, a recent randomized controlled trial found that applica- tion (...) inthefirstpostpartumdays.Useofheating padsappliedtotheabdomenmayrelievethisdiscomfort. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications are more effective than acetaminophen. The data on opioids for the relief of uterine cramping are inconclusive (12, 13). Perineal pain can be treated with nonpharmacologic topical agents, topical anesthetics, or oral analgesics. The few studies that compared topical anesthetics did not find strong evidence that these agents reduce pain better than e36 Committee Opinion Postpartum Pain Management

2018 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

167. Consensus Guidelines on the Use of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions for Acute Pain Management Full Text available with Trip Pro

. Key words used for the different sections included but were not limited to “ketamine,” “norketamine,” “ N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor,” “postoperative,” “perioperative,” “postsurgical,” “preemptive,” “preventive,” “acute pain,” “sickle cell,” “trauma,” “subanesthetic,” “adjunct,” “patient-controlled analgesia,” “opioid,” “contraindication,” “central sensitization,” “nonparenteral,” “oral,” “intranasal,” and “topical.” Protocols from multiple academic, private practice, and government institutions (...) in some individuals with acute pain (grade C recommendation, low level of certainty). | Guideline Question 6: Does Any Evidence Support Patient-Controlled IV Ketamine Analgesia for Acute Pain? Intravenous PCA is a common manner of medication delivery in acute medical and postoperative pain settings. Opioid medications are the most common analgesic medication administered using this method, but ketamine has also been used in IV-PCA as the sole analgesic and in combination with opioids to improve pain

2018 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

168. Ketamine as Adjunctive Analgesic With Bupivacaine in Paravertebral Analgesia for Breast Cancer Surgery

% and inadequate analgesia is considered as an independent risk factor. Hence, a number of therapeutic measures have been accepted as a part of the "multi-modal" approach to post-operative pain control. Thoracic Paravertebral Block (PVB) is used for pain relief after thoracotomy , and mastectomy. PVB can provide profound, long lasting sensory differentiation. The resulting greater attenuation of surgical stress response may translate into reduced inotropic stimulation of the heart. Additionally, unlike general (...) Ketamine as Adjunctive Analgesic With Bupivacaine in Paravertebral Analgesia for Breast Cancer Surgery Ketamine as Adjunctive Analgesic With Bupivacaine in Paravertebral Analgesia for Breast Cancer Surgery - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please

2015 Clinical Trials

169. The Correlation Between Prelabor Analgesic Plan and Actual Labor Analgesia With Satisfaction, Postpartum Depression, and Breast Feeding Success

analgesia, adequacy of pain relief during labor and satisfaction with labor. (see appendix 1). The investigators will evaluate breastfeeding success according to the latch scoring system in the first day postpartum which is routinely administered by nurses/ lactation consultants in the maternity ward. According to their initial desire verses final analgesic choice they will be divided into four groups: Women who initially didn't want and didn't receive one. Initially didn't want and did receive one (...) The Correlation Between Prelabor Analgesic Plan and Actual Labor Analgesia With Satisfaction, Postpartum Depression, and Breast Feeding Success The Correlation Between Prelabor Analgesic Plan and Actual Labor Analgesia With Satisfaction, Postpartum Depression, and Breast Feeding Success - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save

2015 Clinical Trials

170. Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Post-Operative Pain Relief After Arthroscopic Knee Ligament Reconstruction

(pain and time to discharge). Overall, considerable heterogeneity of the included studies was observed. Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Post-Operative Pain Relief After Arthroscopic Knee Ligament Reconstruction: A Rapid Review. August 2014; pp. 1–23 10 Table 1: Randomized Controlled Trials Assessing Femoral Nerve Block With No Femoral Nerve Block Included in Mall and Wright Systematic Review Author, Year Anesthesia Type Sample Size (Intervention/ Control) Femoral Nerve Block (Intervention) No Femoral (...) as they did not have a needle introduced or a muscle contraction from the nerve stimulator. e Half of the control patients were excluded from the study and given a nerve block. f The use of blinding in the trial was not described. g Seven patients (18%) had to be removed from the trial due to inappropriate analgesic administration. Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Post-Operative Pain Relief After Arthroscopic Knee Ligament Reconstruction: A Rapid Review. August 2014; pp. 1–23 21 References (1) Miyasaka KC

2014 Health Quality Ontario

171. α-Pinene, linalool, and 1-octanol contribute to the topical anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of frankincense by inhibiting COX-2. (Abstract)

α-Pinene, linalool, and 1-octanol contribute to the topical anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of frankincense by inhibiting COX-2. Frankincense oil and water extracts (FOE, FWE) have long been used for external treatment of inflammation and pain. The present study was conducted to identify the active ingredients responsible for the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects and to determine the underlying mechanisms.The compositions of FOE and FWE were identified and compared by GC-MS (...) and faster lessening of swelling and pain than mice treated with FWE. The combination of the three components had more potent pharmacological effects on hind paw inflammation and COX-2 overexpression than the three components used alone.These findings suggest that topical application of FOE or its active ingredients (including α-pinene, linalool, and 1-octanol) exhibit significantly anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects through inhibiting nociceptive stimulus-induced inflammatory infiltrates and COX-2

2015 Journal of Ethnopharmacology

172. The Analgesic Activity of a Topical Formulation in Patients With Osteoarthritis of the Hands

hand function in a double blind controlled trial. However none of these measures have proven sufficiently effective to meet patient needs. Topical polytherapy will be employed in this study to see if it will be effective against the pain of OA. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Osteoarthritis of the Hands Drug: A/B Drug: Placebo Drug: B/A Early Phase 1 Detailed Description: A potentially more effective approach is to provide a combination of analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents (...) The Analgesic Activity of a Topical Formulation in Patients With Osteoarthritis of the Hands The Analgesic Activity of a Topical Formulation in Patients With Osteoarthritis of the Hands - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more

2015 Clinical Trials

173. Topical and Intranasal Analgesic Therapy in a Woman with Refractory Postherpetic Neuralgia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Topical and Intranasal Analgesic Therapy in a Woman with Refractory Postherpetic Neuralgia A patient-specific, stepped approach to topical and intranasal analgesic pharmacotherapy was effective in reducing refractory postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) not responding to the current standard of care for PHN. The use of topical analgesic therapy allowed for higher concentrations of medication locally while reducing the likelihood of systemic side effects common to the drugs used. No adverse effects were (...) noted for either topical or intranasal drug therapy. The patient-specific, stepped approach resulted in clinically significant decreases in pain on visual analog scale (VAS), with the use of intranasal ketamine 10% solution and topical gabapentin 6%, ketoprofen 10%, lidocaine 5%, and ketamine 10% cream.

2015 Case reports in medicine

174. Analgesic effect of preoperative topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on postoperative pain after laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy. (Abstract)

Analgesic effect of preoperative topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on postoperative pain after laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy. To assess the effect of preoperative topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on postoperative pain after laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK) and to investigate their mechanism.Severance Eye Hospital and Saeyan Eye Clinic, Seoul, South Korea.Prospective randomized clinical trial.Participants in 2 related studies were assessed (...) . Study 1 comprised patients scheduled for bilateral LASEK (Group 1) who were randomized to receive an NSAID in 1 eye and a placebo in the fellow eye 30, 20, and 10 minutes before LASEK. Postoperative pain, glare, tearing, and irritation were assessed using a visual analog scale. Study 2 comprised healthy subjects (Group 2) who were randomly divided into subgroups. The participants in these subgroups were randomized to receive ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% in 1 eye and placebo (ofloxacin 0.3

2015 Journal of cataract and refractive surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

175. Analgesic effects of topical ketamine. (Abstract)

Analgesic effects of topical ketamine. Topical analgesics may play an important role in the management of chronic pain and have good tolerability. Systemic ketamine has limited usage as an anesthetic and along with its potential for addiction and dependence has not gained popularity as an analgesic compound. Topical ketamine however, is devoid of serious side effects, and thus can be used in the management of various pain states such as neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome (...) . Despite using high concentrations of topical ketamine, clinically significant side effects are rare. The measured plasma levels of ketamine and norketamine in various studies were mostly below the threshold of detection. Topical ketamine has been used as compounded formulations alone in concentrations from 0.5% to 20% or in combination with other (co-)analgesics. Its efficacy may depend on the choice of vehicle, the concentration and the pain state. Suboptimal concentration of ketamine and suboptimal

2015 Minerva anestesiologica

176. Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s: assessment and management

with low back pain with or without sciatica only if the result is likely to change management. 1.2 Non-invasive treatments for low back pain and sciatica Non-pharmacological interv Non-pharmacological interventions entions Self-management Self-management 1.2.1 Provide people with advice and information, tailored to their needs and capabilities, to help them self-manage their low back pain with or without sciatica, at all steps of the treatment pathway. Include: information on the nature of low back (...) progr ogrammes ammes 1.2.15 Promote and facilitate return to work or normal activities of daily living for people with low back pain with or without sciatica. Pharmacological interv Pharmacological interventions entions 1.2.16 For recommendations on pharmacological management of sciatica, see NICE's guideline on neuropathic pain in adults. 1.2.17 Consider oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for managing low back pain, taking into account potential differences in gastrointestinal

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

177. Onset of analgesia by a topically administered flurbiprofen lozenge: a randomised controlled trial using the double stopwatch method. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Onset of analgesia by a topically administered flurbiprofen lozenge: a randomised controlled trial using the double stopwatch method. The double stopwatch (DSW) method for determining the onset of analgesic activity has been implemented extensively by investigators studying orally administered drugs.The aim of this randomised, placebo-controlled trial was to use the DSW method to determine the time to onset of analgesia of a single dose of a topically administered non-steroidal anti (...) -inflammatory drug, flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge.Adults with acute sore throat (n = 122) were examined to confirm the presence of tonsillopharyngitis (Tonsillo-Pharyngitis Assessment) and sore throat pain of at least moderate intensity (≥6 on a 0-10 Sore Throat Scale). Lozenges containing flurbiprofen 8.75 mg or inert ingredients (identically flavoured) were administered under double-blind conditions in the clinic while patients assessed pain and pain relief over 3 hours. Onset of analgesia was determined

2018 British journal of pain Controlled trial quality: uncertain

178. Comparative study of conventional and topical heparin treatment in second degree burn patients for burn analgesia and wound healing. (Abstract)

degree or partial thickness burns (PTB) with topical heparin is superior to conventional treatment in terms of wound healing as well as for pain control. The treatment with topical heparin is well-tolerated and is without higher adverse effects.Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. (...) Comparative study of conventional and topical heparin treatment in second degree burn patients for burn analgesia and wound healing. To compare clinical outcome of topical conventional with topical heparin treatment in 2nd degree or partial thickness (PTB) burn patients.Patients, between the ages of 14 and 60 years with 2nd degree burns involving <20%. Total body surface area (TBSA) on front of chest, abdomen and upper limbs excluding hands and lower limbs were enrolled from September 2015

2018 Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries Controlled trial quality: uncertain

179. Esthesiometric evaluation of corneal analgesia after topical application of 1% morphine sulfate in normal horses. (Abstract)

Esthesiometric evaluation of corneal analgesia after topical application of 1% morphine sulfate in normal horses. To evaluate whether topical ocular application of 1% morphine sulfate would change corneal sensitivity and to identify the duration of action.Eight healthy adult horses.Corneal touch threshold (CTT) was measured in the center of one randomly selected eye of each horse by Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer (Luneau Cochet-Bonnet Esthesiometer; Western Ophthalmics, Lynnwood, WA, USA (...) threshold was not statistically different between morphine-treated and control eyes (P = 0.22). There was a large degree of inter- and intrasubject variation in the CTT measurements obtained. All but three horses were considered to be at baseline values by 60 min.Topical ophthalmic 1% morphine sulfate did not have a clinically significant analgesic effect on the corneal touch threshold of intact healthy equine corneas.© 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

2018 Veterinary ophthalmology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

180. In IV sedation used for dental surgery, neither fentanyl or nalbuphine more effective as an analgesic

In IV sedation used for dental surgery, neither fentanyl or nalbuphine more effective as an analgesic UTCAT2298, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title In IV Sedation Used for Dental Surgery, Neither Fentanyl or Nalbuphine More Effective As An Analgesic Clinical Question In a patient undergoing IV moderate conscious sedation associated with dental surgery, is fentanyl or nalbuphine more effective as a peri (...) along with diazepam. There was no significant difference in pain relief, sedation, recall, and peri-operative vital signs. #2) Lefevre/1992 24 patients, ASA 3 or 4 RCT Key results ASA 3 and 4 patients who required IV sedation for dental surgery were given equipotent doses of either fentanyl or nalbuphine. There was no significant difference in pain relief, sedation, or post operative adverse effects. There was a difference in oxygen saturation during sedation as monitored by pulse oximetry

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

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