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Topical Analgesic

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181. Evaluation of the Analgesic Effect of Ropivacaine in Topical Use at the Thin Skin Graft Donor Site

Evaluation of the Analgesic Effect of Ropivacaine in Topical Use at the Thin Skin Graft Donor Site Evaluation of the Analgesic Effect of Ropivacaine in Topical Use at the Thin Skin Graft Donor Site - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove (...) one or more studies before adding more. Evaluation of the Analgesic Effect of Ropivacaine in Topical Use at the Thin Skin Graft Donor Site (ROPI) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01999153 Recruitment

2013 Clinical Trials

182. Mechanisms of topical analgesics in relieving pain in an animal model of muscular inflammation. (PubMed)

Mechanisms of topical analgesics in relieving pain in an animal model of muscular inflammation. To investigate the possible mechanisms of topical analgesics in relieving pain in an animal model of muscular inflammation.Adult Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce inflammation in the anterior tibialis muscle of left hindlimb. One of two types of topical analgesics: Xiaotong Tiegao (XTT), a Tibetan herb compound, or Capzasin (CAP), a cream (...) containing 0.1% capsaicin, was applied to the skin over the inflamed anterior tibialis muscle. The following experiments were performed: pain behavioral tests, evaluation of plasma extravasation in the affected limb, and electrophysiological recordings of afferent nerve fibers.The behavioral experiments demonstrated that applications of either type of topical analgesic to the skin over the inflamed muscle significantly reduced muscular inflammatory pain, as indicated by the increased weight bearing

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2013 Pain Medicine

183. In IV sedation used for dental surgery, neither fentanyl or nalbuphine more effective as an analgesic

In IV sedation used for dental surgery, neither fentanyl or nalbuphine more effective as an analgesic UTCAT2298, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title In IV Sedation Used for Dental Surgery, Neither Fentanyl or Nalbuphine More Effective As An Analgesic Clinical Question In a patient undergoing IV moderate conscious sedation associated with dental surgery, is fentanyl or nalbuphine more effective as a peri (...) -operative analgesic? Clinical Bottom Line Neither fentanyl or nalbuphine is shown to have a clinical advantage as a peri-operative analgesic associated with IV moderate sedation in the dental office. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Dolan/1998 50 patients, ASA 1 or 2 RCT Key results Dental surgery patients who required IV sedation, were given equipotent doses of either fentanyl or nalbuphine

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

184. Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances.

* Associated Topics Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. Arthur Jeske DMD, PhD; James Zahrowski DMD, MS, PharmD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Over-the counter analgesics appear to relieve pain from orthodontic appliances with some evidence suggesting their preemptive use may be appropriate. Critical Summary Assessment A of a few, small randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that over-the-counter analgesics (...) Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

185. Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances.

* Associated Topics Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. Arthur Jeske DMD, PhD; James Zahrowski DMD, MS, PharmD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Over-the counter analgesics appear to relieve pain from orthodontic appliances with some evidence suggesting their preemptive use may be appropriate. Critical Summary Assessment A of a few, small randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that over-the-counter analgesics (...) Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

186. Recommendations for the Prophylactic Use of Analgesics and Antipyretics

immunization to the general public, health care providers and clients they immunize. In the context of these roles PHNs encounter questions from the public regarding strategies to prevent pain and adverse events. In order to provide accurate advice Peel Public Health staff need to be aware of current evidence related to this topic. A number of immunization advisory bodies provide recommendations to the public regarding the prophylactic use of analgesics/antipyretics to prevent immunization side effects (...) prophylactic use of oral analgesics/antipyretics. Communicating the results of this review will provide opportunities for Region of Peel health care providers to access the evidence on this topic and for dialogue on evidence based practice options. 6.1 Political Acceptability Given that some health care organizations recommend the use of antipyretics/analgesics prophylactically, some debate and or resistance among health care providers may ensue. It is anticipated that communication

2011 Peel Health Library

187. Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances.

* Associated Topics Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. Arthur Jeske DMD, PhD; James Zahrowski DMD, MS, PharmD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Over-the counter analgesics appear to relieve pain from orthodontic appliances with some evidence suggesting their preemptive use may be appropriate. Critical Summary Assessment A of a few, small randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that over-the-counter analgesics (...) Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. Evidence suggests that over-the-counter analgesics are efficacious in relieving pain from fixed orthodontic appliances. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

188. Topical diltiazem for pain after closed hemorrhoidectomy. (PubMed)

Topical diltiazem for pain after closed hemorrhoidectomy. Anal sphincter spasm contributes to the appearance of postoperative pain following hemorrhoidectomy.To determine the efficacy of topical diltiazem in the control of post-hemorrhoidectomy pain.A randomized, prospective, experimental, double-blind study was conducted on 2 groups of patients in the postoperative period of closed hemorrhoidectomy. Each group consisted of 17 patients. Group A received topical diltiazem in the anal region 3 (...) times a day and group B received a placebo. Ketorolac was administered to both groups as rescue therapy.In group A, the mean score on the visual analog scale was 2.97±1.18cm at 24h, 1.51±1.18cm at 48h, and 0.84±0.92cm at 72h. In group B, it was 6.82±1.9cm at 24h, 5.3±1.66cm at 48h, and 4.32±2.13cm at 72h (P<.001, 95% CI). The mean number of analgesic doses in group A was 2.41±0.87 at 24h, 1.11±0.85 at 48h, and 0.94±0.96 at 72h. In group B, it was 3.82±0.52 at 24h, 3.64±0.70 at 48h, and 2.88±1.26

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2017 Revista de gastroenterologia de Mexico

189. Effect of Topical Morphine on Acute and Chronic Postmastectomy Pain: What Is the Optimum Dose? (PubMed)

Effect of Topical Morphine on Acute and Chronic Postmastectomy Pain: What Is the Optimum Dose? Poorly controlled postoperative pain is strongly associated with the development of chronic pain. We aimed to investigate the effect of topical morphine (in 1 of 3 doses: 5, 10, or 15 mg) on acute and chronic neuropathic pain after modified radical mastectomy for cancer breast.In this registered clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02462577), 90 patients were allocated to receive 10 mL (...) of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs scores in first and third postoperative months.No patient in the Morphine15 group requested postoperative PCA morphine versus 19 and 8 in the Morphine5 and Morphine10 groups, respectively (P < 0.002). Time to first analgesic request and total consumption of PCA morphine analgesia were 7.31 ± 3.12 hours versus 14.00 ± 3.54 hours (P < 0.000) and 1.42 ± 0.50 mg versus 1.00 ± 0.00 mg (P = 0.371) in the Morphine5 and Morphine10 groups, respectively. Lowest scores on visual analog

2017 Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

190. Comparison of topical ropivacaine with and without ketamine on post-surgical pain in children undergoing tonsillectomy: a randomized controlled double-blind study. (PubMed)

) and the other group received topical ropivacaine with 20 mg ketamine (RK group) on the tonsillar bed. Pain scores using the modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (mCHEOPS) at 15 min and 30 min, and at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 h were recorded. Rescue analgesic requirement and complications were also recorded.A total of 66 patients were randomly assigned to the RS group (n = 33) and the RK group (n = 33). The mCHEOPS scores were significantly lower in the RK group at 15 min (P = 0.046 (...) Comparison of topical ropivacaine with and without ketamine on post-surgical pain in children undergoing tonsillectomy: a randomized controlled double-blind study. Tonsillectomy in pediatric patients may cause severe postoperative pain. Topical local anesthetics are an easy and safe way to control post-tonsillectomy pain, but there is no benefit during the early postoperative stage. Topical ketamine shows a good effect on early stage postoperative pain. We compared the effect of topical

2017 Journal of anesthesia

191. Prospective Study With Adjunctive Once Daily Topical Nepafenac 0.3% Versus Placebo

Prospective Study With Adjunctive Once Daily Topical Nepafenac 0.3% Versus Placebo Prospective Study With Adjunctive Once Daily Topical Nepafenac 0.3% Versus Placebo - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before (...) adding more. Prospective Study With Adjunctive Once Daily Topical Nepafenac 0.3% Versus Placebo The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03025945 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : January 20, 2017 Results First Posted : December 14, 2018 Last Update Posted : December 14, 2018

2017 Clinical Trials

192. Phase 1 Study of the Effects of Combining Topical FDA-approved Drugs on Age-related Pathways on the Skin of Healthy Volunteers

Phase 1 Study of the Effects of Combining Topical FDA-approved Drugs on Age-related Pathways on the Skin of Healthy Volunteers Phase 1 Study of the Effects of Combining Topical FDA-approved Drugs on Age-related Pathways on the Skin of Healthy Volunteers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Phase 1 Study of the Effects of Combining Topical FDA-approved Drugs on Age-related Pathways on the Skin of Healthy Volunteers The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03072485 Recruitment Status

2017 Clinical Trials

193. Use of Topical Liquid Diclofenac Following Laser Microporation of Cutaneous Neurofibromas in Patients With NF1

Use of Topical Liquid Diclofenac Following Laser Microporation of Cutaneous Neurofibromas in Patients With NF1 Use of Topical Liquid Diclofenac Following Laser Microporation of Cutaneous Neurofibromas in Patients With NF1 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Use of Topical Liquid Diclofenac Following Laser Microporation of Cutaneous Neurofibromas in Patients With NF1 The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03090971 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : March 27, 2017 Last

2017 Clinical Trials

194. Topical cryoanesthesia for the relief of pain caused by steroid injections used to treat hypertrophic scars and keloids. (PubMed)

of the analgesic effect is also slow, which means that the use of topical anesthetics is time-consuming in clinical practice.We hypothesized that a commercially available cryotip could be used to provide fast-acting topical cryoanesthesia that would reduce the pain associated with steroid injections.Thirty patients with hypertrophic scars or keloids were enrolled in the study. Scars were injected with the steroid, triamcinolone acetonide, with or without prior application of the cryotip (-10 °C) for 15 seconds (...) Topical cryoanesthesia for the relief of pain caused by steroid injections used to treat hypertrophic scars and keloids. Intralesional steroid injections are the standard treatment for hypertrophic scars and keloids. The procedure is, however, quite painful and is unpopular with patients because of this. Topical application of anesthetic creams, such as Ametop gel (tetracaine) and EMLA cream (lidocaine and prilocaine), has limited efficacy because of poor drug penetration. The onset

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2017 Medicine

195. Role of Neurogenic Inflammation and Topical 6% Gabapentin Therapy in Symptomatic Scarring Alopecia

Role of Neurogenic Inflammation and Topical 6% Gabapentin Therapy in Symptomatic Scarring Alopecia Role of Neurogenic Inflammation and Topical 6% Gabapentin Therapy in Symptomatic Scarring Alopecia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove (...) one or more studies before adding more. Role of Neurogenic Inflammation and Topical 6% Gabapentin Therapy in Symptomatic Scarring Alopecia The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03346668 Recruitment Status

2017 Clinical Trials

196. Topical Medical Cannabis (TMC): A new treatment for wound pain-Three cases of Pyoderma Gangrenosum. (PubMed)

that are frequently fatal. Thus, novel analgesic strategies for wound-related pain need to be investigated. The ideal methods of pain relief for wound patients are modalities that are topical, lack systemic side effects, noninvasive, self-administered, and display rapid onset of analgesia. Extracts derived from the cannabis plant have been applied to wounds for thousands of years. The discovery of the human endocannabinoid system and its dominant presence throughout the integumentary system provides a valid (...) Topical Medical Cannabis (TMC): A new treatment for wound pain-Three cases of Pyoderma Gangrenosum. Pain associated with integumentary wounds is highly prevalent, yet it remains an area of significant unmet need within health care. Currently, systemically administered opioids are the mainstay of treatment. However, recent publications are casting opioids in a negative light given their high side effect profile, inhibition of wound healing, and association with accidental overdose, incidents

2017 Journal of pain and symptom management

197. A dose-response study of topical allyl-isothiocyanate (mustard oil) as human surrogate model of pain, hyperalgesia, and neurogenic inflammation. (PubMed)

a significant dose-dependent increase with a ceiling effect from 50% to 90%. Topical AITC application produces pain and somatosensory sensitization in a dose-dependent manner with optimal concentrations recommended to be >10% and ≤50%. The model is translatable to humans and could be useful in pharmacological proof-of-concept studies of TRPA1-antagonists, analgesics, and anti-inflammatory compounds or for exploratory clinical purposes, eg, loss- or gain-of-function in peripheral neuropathies. (...) A dose-response study of topical allyl-isothiocyanate (mustard oil) as human surrogate model of pain, hyperalgesia, and neurogenic inflammation. Despite being a ubiquitous animal pain model, the natural TRPA1-agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, also known as "mustard oil") has only been sparsely investigated as a potential human surrogate model of pain, sensitization, and neurogenic inflammation. Its dose-response as an algogenic, sensitizing irritant remains to be elucidated in human skin

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2017 Pain

198. Ototoxicity associated with topical administration of diclofenac sodium as an otic drop: An experimental animal study. (PubMed)

Ototoxicity associated with topical administration of diclofenac sodium as an otic drop: An experimental animal study. The aim of the study is to evaluate the ototoxicity of topical diclofenac sodium in comparison to positive and negative controls prior to the investigation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy of the agent in otic administration.Twenty four ears of 12 guinea pigs were included in the study. Wide myringotomy was performed on all tympanic membranes under general anesthesia (...) groups.Diclofenac sodium, considered as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory otic preparation, is shown to be as ototoxic as gentamicin in chronic use which may lead to loss of hearing especially when used topically in chronic otitis cases with tympanic membrane damage.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2017 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

199. A clinical and mechanistic study of topical borneol-induced analgesia. (PubMed)

A clinical and mechanistic study of topical borneol-induced analgesia. Bingpian is a time-honored herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is an almost pure chemical with a chemical composition of (+)-borneol and has been historically used as a topical analgesic for millennia. However, the clinical efficacy of topical borneol lacks stringent evidence-based clinical studies and verifiable scientific mechanism. We examined the analgesic efficacy of topical borneol in a randomized, double (...) mechanistic differences between borneol- and menthol-induced analgesia and indicated that borneol exhibits advantages over menthol as a topical analgesic. Our work demonstrates that borneol, which is currently approved by the US FDA to be used only as a flavoring substance or adjuvant in food, is an effective topical pain reliever in humans and reveals a key part of the molecular mechanism underlying its analgesic effect.© 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

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2017 EMBO molecular medicine

200. Topical Ropivacaine in Prevention of Post-Tonsillectomy Pain in Adults. (PubMed)

Topical Ropivacaine in Prevention of Post-Tonsillectomy Pain in Adults. Post-tonsillectomy pain is 1 of the most intense postoperative pain conditions. However, optimal and sufficient postoperative analgesic treatment remains unclear. We investigated the effect of topical ropivacaine for post-tonsillectomy pain in 160 adult outpatient surgery patients over 2 postoperative weeks.At the end of tonsillectomy, 2 swabs soaked in either 1% ropivacaine or saline were packed into the tonsillar beds (...) for 5 minutes. We used ibuprofen and a combination of acetaminophen (500 mg)-codeine (30 mg) tablets as postoperative analgesics for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was pain intensity on swallowing measured on a numeric rating scale (NRSs) during the first postoperative week expressed as area under curve (AUC). The secondary endpoints included the worst pain experienced during the 2-hour follow-up in the postanesthesia care unit, pain intensity during the second postoperative week, and the number

2017 Anesthesia and Analgesia

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