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Topical NSAID

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2. Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness

Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Published on: January 30, 2017 Project Number: RC0844 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of topical NSAIDs versus opioids for the treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain? Key Message Compared with placebo, topical NSAIDs were effective in reducing pain from acute musculoskeletal conditions, such as sprains, strains or sport injuries. Adverse events were rare and were usually related to skin reactions. No evidence regarding

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

3. Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults. (PubMed)

Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults. Use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat chronic musculoskeletal conditions has become widely accepted because they can provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. This review is an update of 'Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults', originally published in Issue 9, 2012.To review the evidence from randomised, double-blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety (...) of topically applied NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and our own in-house database; the date of the last search was February 2016. We also searched the references lists of included studies and reviews, and sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching online clinical trial registers and manufacturers' web sites.We included randomised, double-blind, active or inert carrier

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2016 Cochrane

4. Systematic review: Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries

Systematic review: Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults with acute musculoskeletal injuries Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review Topical NSAIDs significantly reduces pain in adults

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

5. Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis?

Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By May 6, 2016 // A blog for non-medical readers by Lynda Ware, Senior Fellow in General Practice with Cochrane UK. “Just put some cream on it….” According to my three daughters, this was my stock response to any request they made for motherly intervention when pain struck. Whilst refuting this slur utterly (and the one about not even looking), I (...) might now point them in the direction of this updated review, which assesses the efficacy and safety of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), albeit in the context of chronic musculoskeletal pain rather than a bruised shin or finger. What’s more, I will point out that it’s likely that the carrier, to which the active drug is added, is pretty effective in its own right. Why is this important? Topical NSAIDs can act precisely where needed and without having to be absorbed via

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2016 Evidently Cochrane

6. Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis?

Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? Can topical NSAIDs help relieve the pain of arthritis? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By May 6, 2016 // A blog for non-medical readers by Lynda Ware, Senior Fellow in General Practice with Cochrane UK. “Just put some cream on it….” According to my three daughters, this was my stock response to any request they made for motherly intervention when pain struck. Whilst refuting this slur utterly (and the one about not even looking), I (...) might now point them in the direction of this updated review, which assesses the efficacy and safety of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), albeit in the context of chronic musculoskeletal pain rather than a bruised shin or finger. What’s more, I will point out that it’s likely that the carrier, to which the active drug is added, is pretty effective in its own right. Why is this important? Topical NSAIDs can act precisely where needed and without having to be absorbed via

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2016 Evidently Cochrane

7. Topical NSAIDs for acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. (PubMed)

Topical NSAIDs for acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. Use of topical NSAIDs to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions has become widely accepted because they can provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. This review is an update of 'Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults' originally published in Issue 6, 2010.To determine the efficacy and safety of topically applied NSAIDs in acute musculoskeletal pain in adults.We searched the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (...) particularly interested to compare different formulations (gel, cream, plaster) of individual NSAIDs.For this update we added 14 new included studies (3489 participants), and excluded four studies. We also identified 20 additional reports of completed or ongoing studies that have not been published in full. The earlier review included 47 studies.This update included 61 studies. Most compared topical NSAIDs in the form of a gel, spray, or cream with a similar topical placebo; 5311 participants were treated

2015 Cochrane

8. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie (...) settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

9. Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain

Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By June 25, 2015 // Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed for mild to moderate pain and are the most commonly prescribed painkilling drugs worldwide. Taken by mouth or injected into a vein, the high concentrations of the drug throughout the body, necessary in order to work at the site of pain (...) and inflammation, can cause unpleasant or even serious side effects. Applied to the skin, so in a topical preparation such as a gel, cream or plaster, they can act where needed to relieve pain without affecting the rest of the body. For superficial painful conditions like sprains, strains and muscle soreness (and where the skin is unbroken) topical NSAIDs offer this clear advantage over taking tablets, as long as they work. How good are topical NSAIDs? A has been updated with new research confirming

2015 Evidently Cochrane

10. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exacerbated respiratory disease phenotype: Topical NSAID and asthma control - A possible oversight link. (PubMed)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exacerbated respiratory disease phenotype: Topical NSAID and asthma control - A possible oversight link. Patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) also recently known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) must avoid aspirin and all other oral NSAIDs. The effect of topical NSAID (tNSAID), especially salicylates which are commonly present in topical medicated preparations, on asthma (...) respectively. Except for 2 patients, there was no change in asthma maintenance medications pre and post-intervention. Asthma control significantly (p < 0.05) improved based on pre and post-intervention ACT score, number of exacerbations, FEV1 were 14.9 and 22.1, 1.9 and 0.43, 1.28L and 1.67L respectively.It is paramount to eliminate not only oral but topical NSAID exposure in NERD phenotype asthmatic patients. When a long-standing asthma progressed to uncontrolled, a meticulous evaluation of tNSAIDs

2016 Respiratory medicine

11. Corneal perforation in undiagnosed Sjögren’s syndrome following topical NSAID and steroid drops post routine cataract extraction (PubMed)

Corneal perforation in undiagnosed Sjögren’s syndrome following topical NSAID and steroid drops post routine cataract extraction A 74-year-old man presented with a progressive decrease in visual acuity and foreign body sensation in his right eye 8 days post uncomplicated phacoemulsification cataract surgery and intraocular lens insertion. The patient had been placed on a perioperative cataract regimen which consisted of G. Maxitrol (dexamethasone, polymyxin B sulfate, neomycin sulfate) four

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2018 BMJ case reports

12. Use of Topical NSAID to Reduce Pain in Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Lichenoid Lesions.

Use of Topical NSAID to Reduce Pain in Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Lichenoid Lesions. Use of Topical NSAID to Reduce Pain in Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Lichenoid Lesions. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before (...) adding more. Use of Topical NSAID to Reduce Pain in Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Lichenoid Lesions. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03509675 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting First Posted : April 26

2018 Clinical Trials

13. Factors Related to the Use of Topical vs. Oral NSAIDs for Sprains, Strains, and Contusions in a Senior Population: A Retrospective Analysis of Administrative Claims Data. (PubMed)

Factors Related to the Use of Topical vs. Oral NSAIDs for Sprains, Strains, and Contusions in a Senior Population: A Retrospective Analysis of Administrative Claims Data. Research to date on sprains, strains, and contusions has focused mainly on the analysis of sports-related injuries, occupational injuries, injuries resulting from automobile accidents, and severe injuries that result in inpatient hospital stays. Little is known about real-world acute sprains, strains, and contusions (...) in an aging population. Patients may be treated with over-the-counter, oral, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for acute sprains, strains, and contusions or may require the use of prescription NSAIDs. For sprains, strains, and contusions treated with prescription NSAIDs, the choice of topical administration or oral administration likely depends on a number of factors such as age and comorbid conditions.The objective of the study was to identify factors associated with the use

2018 Drugs & Aging

14. Should Topical NSAIDs Be Used to Treat Acute Musculoskeletal Conditions?

Should Topical NSAIDs Be Used to Treat Acute Musculoskeletal Conditions? SystematicReviewSnapshot ClinicalSynopsis TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Topical nonsteroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs effectively reduce pain associated with musculoskeletal conditions compared with placebo, with fewer adverse events compared with oral nonsteroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs. METHODS DATA SOURCES The authors searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library, 2009, issue 4), MEDLINE (...) the list of those included in this review. 7 This Cochrane review demonstrated that topical non- steroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs, com- pared with placebo, provide adequate Performance of topical nonsteroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs versus placebo in acute musculoskeletal injuries. Studies (Total No. of Patients) Treatment Bene?t,* RR (95% CI) Adverse Event, † RR (95% CI) I 2 ,% Topical NSAID vs placebo 31 (3,462) 1.5 (1.4–1.6) 1.1 (0.88–1.4) 74 RR, Relative risk; CI, con?dence interval; NSAID

2011 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

15. Combinatorial treatment with topical NSAIDs and anti-VEGF for age-related macular degeneration, a meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Combinatorial treatment with topical NSAIDs and anti-VEGF for age-related macular degeneration, a meta-analysis. Inflammation is a key pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the clinical importance of combining anti-VEGF agents and topical NSAIDs to reduce inflammation remains unclear. In this study, we systematically reviewed clinical trials comparing combined treatment versus anti-VEGF alone in AMD patients. We quantified treatment effects via meta-analysis (...) . The pooled weighted mean difference (WMD, -0.91, 95%CI: -1.39 to -0.42, P = 0.0003) demonstrates that combined treatment may reduce required anti-VEGF injection number, probably by means of decreasing central retina thickness (CRT) (WMD = -22.9, 95% CI: -41.20 to -4.59, P = 0.01). The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) did not change significantly between these two groups (WMD = - 0.01, 95%CI: -0.23 to 0.20, P = 0.90). Topical NSAIDs slightly increased the incidence of foreign body sensation (Odds Ratio

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2017 PloS one

17. Comparative Risk of Cardiovascular Outcomes Between Topical and Oral Nonselective NSAIDs in Taiwanese Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis (PubMed)

Comparative Risk of Cardiovascular Outcomes Between Topical and Oral Nonselective NSAIDs in Taiwanese Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Topical NSAIDs have less systemic absorption than oral NSAIDs. We examined the risk of cardiovascular events associated with nonselective topical NSAIDs versus oral NSAIDs among patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Taiwan.We conducted a retrospective cohort study that included patients with incident rheumatoid arthritis who were newly starting therapy (...) with nonselective topical NSAIDs or oral NSAIDs. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The first date patients received either type of NSAID was defined as the index date. NSAID exposures continued until there was a treatment gap of >30 days. The main outcome was composite cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, heart failure, stroke, or revascularization. Follow-up was censored at treatment discontinuation, switch or addition of other NSAID

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2017 Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease

18. NSAIDs

trusted evidence on nsaids or other clinical topics then use Trip today. This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on nsaids and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months. What is Trip? Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care. Trip has been online since 1997 (...) contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Top results for nsaids 1. Topical NSAIDs : good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain Topical NSAIDs : good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By June 25, 2015 // Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ) are routinely prescribed for mild to moderate pain and are the most commonly prescribed painkilling drugs worldwide. Taken by mouth or injected into a vein, the high concentrations of the drug throughout

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

19. NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections

NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated urinary tract infections – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2017\/06\/mo2017-5.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jun 09 2017 NSAIDs as treatment for uncomplicated (...) urinary tract infections By in , , Journal reference: Gagyor I, Bleidorn J, Kochen MM, Schmiemann G, Wegscheider K, Hummers-Pradier E. Ibuprofen versus fosfomycin for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: randomised controlled trial. Bmj 2015 Dec 23;351:h6544. Link: Published: December 2015 Evidence cookie says… NSAIDs should not be recommended as a first line treatment for uncomplicated UTIs in women compared with women who received empirical antibiotics, those who received regular

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2017 Morsels of Evidence

20. Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs?

common in long-term NSAID use (up to 40%) [6] and the majority of these will never present clinically [1]. Guidelines around the topic are a little vague. NICE guidance documents are relatively assertive in recommending co-prescribing of PPIs with NSAIDs, especially for people with arthritis [7]. eTG Complete recommends that prophylaxis be considered for patients with “risk factors for increased gastrointestinal toxicity” [8]. In the absence of large randomised trials using clinical outcomes [2 (...) Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs? Should PPIs be routinely co-prescribed with long-term NSAIDs? – Morsels of Evidence \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t \t\t\t\r\n\t\t\t Like this: Like Loading... ","author":{"@type":"Person","name":"Michael Tam"},"image":["https:\/\/evidencebasedmedicine.com.au\/wp-content\/uploads\/2017\/07\/mo2017-7-ee-cover.png"]} Toggle search form Toggle navigation Evidence-based medicine for general practitioners Jul 03 2017 Should PPIs be routinely co

2017 Morsels of Evidence

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