How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

27,530 results for

Topical Corticosteroid

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

2. Topical Corticosteroids Improve Healing Time in Patients with Aphthous Ulcers

Topical Corticosteroids Improve Healing Time in Patients with Aphthous Ulcers UTCAT3273, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Topical Corticosteroids Improve Healing Time in Patients with Aphthous Ulcers Clinical Question In patients with aphthous ulcers, does treatment with topical corticosteroids, as compared to a placebo, improve healing time of the ulcers? Clinical Bottom Line Patients treated (...) with topical corticosteroids show an improved ulcer healing time. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Staines/2015 8 studies/583 patients Systematic review of randomized trials Key results 5 of the 8 studies in which ulcer duration was evaluated found that application of topical corticosteroids decreased the time required for the ulcer to heal (P Evidence Search “recurrent” AND “aphthous

2017 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

3. Assessing the response of morphea and limited scleroderma to tranilast: a small prospective study comparing topical corticosteroids to a combination of topical corticosteroids and tranilast (PubMed)

Assessing the response of morphea and limited scleroderma to tranilast: a small prospective study comparing topical corticosteroids to a combination of topical corticosteroids and tranilast Scleroderma is traditionally managed with immunomodulatory agents such as methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. There are anecdotal reports for, and theoretical reasons why, the anti-fibrotic agent tranilast may provide an additional treatment modality.The objective of the current study (...) was to demonstrate if the addition of topical tranilast to an established regime resulted in an improvement in the Localized Scleroderma Assessment Tool (LoSCAT) and modified Rodnan score.A small double-blinded randomized prospective study of 11 pairs of treatment sites in four patients; three with morphea and one with limited scleroderma was performed. All patients continued with their prescribed treatment and applied 0.1% betamethasone valerate in PCCA PracaSil™ (B) to the control site with 0.1% betamethasone

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Clinical, cosmetic and investigational dermatology

4. Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Topical 5% Minoxidil and Potent Topical Corticosteroid Versus Intralesional Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03535233 Recruitment Status

2018 Clinical Trials

5. Systematic review: Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis

Systematic review: Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) , please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Best evidence supports topical corticosteroids and routine saline irrigations for medical treatment of chronic

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

6. Topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys. (PubMed)

Topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys. Until recently, phimosis has been treated surgically by circumcision or prepuceplasty; however, recent reports of non-invasive treatment using topical corticosteroids applied for four to eight weeks have been favourable. The efficacy and safety of topical corticosteroids for treating phimosis in boys has not been previously systematically reviewed.We aimed to 1) compare the effectiveness of the use of topical corticosteroid ointment applied (...) to the distal stenotic portion of the prepuce in the resolution of phimosis in boys compared with the use of placebo or no treatment, and 2) determine the rate of partial resolution (improvement) of phimosis, rate of re-stenosis after initial resolution or improvement of phimosis, and the rate of adverse events of topical corticosteroid treatment in boys with phimosis.We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant

2014 Cochrane

7. Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. (PubMed)

Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Bacterial keratitis is a serious ocular infectious disease that can lead to severe visual disability. Risk factors for bacterial corneal infection include contact lens wear, ocular surface disease, corneal trauma, and previous ocular or eyelid surgery. Topical antibiotics constitute the mainstay of treatment in cases of bacterial keratitis, whereas the use of topical corticosteroids as an adjunctive therapy to antibiotics (...) remains controversial. Topical corticosteroids are usually used to control inflammation using the smallest amount of the drug. Their use requires optimal timing, concomitant antibiotics, and careful follow-up.The objective of the review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Secondary objectives included evaluation of health economic outcomes and quality of life outcomes.We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Cochrane

8. Comparative safety and efficacy of topical mometasone furoate with other topical corticosteroids. (PubMed)

Comparative safety and efficacy of topical mometasone furoate with other topical corticosteroids. Derivatives of hydrocortisone, such as mometasone furoate, a (2') furoate-17 ester with chlorine substitutions at positions 9 and 21, have been designed to improve efficacy and reduce the incidence of adverse effects. An extensive literature search of MEDLINE, Embase and other databases was conducted to review the safety and efficacy of various formulations of topical mometasone furoate. Mometasone (...) biotransformation, and consequently has no significant effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The molecular biotransformation of mometasone furoate in the skin results in a lower affinity with dermal cells than epidermal cells, which contributes to its low atrophogenicity. Sensitisation to mometasone furoate is low. Overall, mometasone furoate is a highly efficacious potent corticosteroid with a low risk of both local and systemic adverse effects.© 2018 Ego Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd. Australasian

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Australasian Journal of Dermatology

9. Topical Corticosteroid Pretreatment Mitigates Cellular Damage After Caustic Injury to the Nasal Upper Airway Epithelium. (PubMed)

Topical Corticosteroid Pretreatment Mitigates Cellular Damage After Caustic Injury to the Nasal Upper Airway Epithelium. Topical corticosteroids are currently employed to reduce established airway inflammation; their prophylactic use might help limit cellular damage against harmful stimuli.To determine the effects of a prophylactic topical application of budesonide (BD) on an in vivo nasal epithelium injury model induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA).C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to intranasal TCA (...) topical application. Three groups received topical intranasal BD, saline solution, or no intervention prior to a single topical exposure to TCA. Controls were not exposed to TCA. Whole nasal cavity coronal sections were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 days postinjury at tissue and cellular levels using histopathological analysis, immunofluorescent staining, and fresh tissue RNA microarray analysis.Prophylactic topical corticosteroid exposure protected the nasal epithelium from acute damage, maintaining

2019 American journal of rhinology & allergy

10. Topical corticosteroids for treatment-resistant atopic dermatitis. (PubMed)

Topical corticosteroids for treatment-resistant atopic dermatitis. Although topical corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), these medications may lose efficacy over time, a phenomenon known as tachyphylaxis. However, the underlying mechanism for tachyphylaxis may be due to lack of treatment adherence rather than loss of efficacy of topical corticosteroids. In this study, we aimed to determine if AD patients who were previously unsuccessfully treated with topical (...) corticosteroids would respond to desoximetasone spray 0.25% under conditions designed to promote good adherence over a 7-day period. At baseline, patients were randomized to receive either twice-daily telephone calls to discuss treatment adherence (intervention group) or no telephone calls (control group) during the study period. The patients improved rapidly. In most patients, treatment-resistant AD is most likely due to poor adherence to treatment rather than loss of drug responsiveness.

2019 Cutis

11. Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (LIBERTY AD CHRONOS): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. (PubMed)

Long-term management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with dupilumab and concomitant topical corticosteroids (LIBERTY AD CHRONOS): a 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. Dupilumab (an anti-interleukin-4-receptor-α monoclonal antibody) blocks signalling of interleukin 4 and interleukin 13, type 2/Th2 cytokines implicated in numerous allergic diseases ranging from asthma to atopic dermatitis. Previous 16-week monotherapy studies showed that dupilumab (...) substantially improved signs and symptoms of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis with acceptable safety, validating the crucial role of interleukin 4 and interleukin 13 in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. We aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of dupilumab with medium-potency topical corticosteroids versus placebo with topical corticosteroids in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.In this 1-year, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study (LIBERTY AD CHRONOS

2017 Lancet

12. Association Between Topical Corticosteroid Use and Type 2 Diabetes in Two European Population-Based Adult Cohorts. (PubMed)

Association Between Topical Corticosteroid Use and Type 2 Diabetes in Two European Population-Based Adult Cohorts. Topical corticosteroids (CSs) are commonly used to treat inflammatory skin conditions including eczema and psoriasis. Although topical CS package inserts describe hyperglycemia and glycosuria as adverse drug reactions, it is unclear whether topical CS use in real life is also associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D).Two matched case-control studies and one cohort (...) study were conducted using routinely collected health care data from Denmark and the U.K. A total of 115,218 and 54,944 adults were identified as case subjects with new-onset T2D in the Danish and U.K. case-control study, respectively. For the Danish cohort study, 2,689,473 adults were included. The main exposure was topical CSs, and the outcome was incident T2D.Topical CS was significantly associated with T2D in the Danish (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.35 [95% CI 1.33-1.38]) and U.K. (adjusted

2019 Diabetes Care

13. Systemic allergic dermatitis after patch testing with dibucaine and topical corticosteroids. (PubMed)

Systemic allergic dermatitis after patch testing with dibucaine and topical corticosteroids. Systemic allergic dermatitis arises if an individual sensitised via the skin is exposed to the same allergen or a cross reacting allergen by a different route1 . It is rarely elicited by cutaneous contact with an allergen2 , although transepidermal rechallenge has been reported3 . We report a case of systemic allergic dermatitis caused by patch testing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

2019 Contact Dermatitis

14. Assessment of Topical Corticosteroid Prescribing, Counseling, and Communication Among Dermatologists and Pharmacists. (PubMed)

Assessment of Topical Corticosteroid Prescribing, Counseling, and Communication Among Dermatologists and Pharmacists. Topical corticosteroids (TCs) are common treatments for many dermatologic conditions. Anecdotal experience and literature suggest that dermatologists and pharmacists differ in their beliefs about TCs and approach to TC counseling, creating the opportunity for patient confusion.To examine interprofessional practice gaps between dermatologists and pharmacists with regard to how

2019 JAMA dermatology (Chicago, Ill.)

15. Psoriasis patients’ experiences concerning medical adherence to treatment with topical corticosteroids (PubMed)

Psoriasis patients’ experiences concerning medical adherence to treatment with topical corticosteroids Nonadherence to topical treatment of psoriasis is a common cause of treatment failure. This focus group study was conducted to obtain the patients' own experiences and explanations regarding medical adherence. The participants consisted of eight primary adherent patients with moderate psoriasis treated with corticosteroid or corticosteroid-calcipotriol combinations, purposefully sampled (...) in the prescriber, diverging information from health care personnel, experiencing side effects, having fear of side effects, impractical formulations of topical products, and impatience regarding time before an effect of the treatment was observed. From this study, the recommendations for the prescribing doctor to improve medical adherence are, the doctor needs to take time to listen to the patient, prescribe a topical product that is easy to apply and less greasy, inform the patients about benefits from

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Psoriasis (Auckland, N.Z.)

16. Long-term topical corticosteroid use and risk of skin cancer: a systematic review protocol. (PubMed)

Long-term topical corticosteroid use and risk of skin cancer: a systematic review protocol. The objective of this systematic review is to synthesize the best available research evidence to determine the risk of skin cancer in patients on long-term use of topical corticosteroids. Specifically the review question is: In people using long-term (regular use over one month) topical corticosteroids, what is the risk of developing skin cancer (clinically or histologically confirmed basal cell

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports

17. Comparison of the effectiveness of topical silicone gel and corticosteroid cream on the pfannenstiel scar prevention - a randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Comparison of the effectiveness of topical silicone gel and corticosteroid cream on the pfannenstiel scar prevention - a randomized controlled trial. To compare the effects of topical silicone gel and corticosteroid cream for preventing hypertrophic scar and keloid formation following Pfannenstiel incisions.Fifty patients operated for benign gynecological diseases through primary Pfannenstiel incision were included. The wounds were randomly allocated to the treatment and control arms (...) with the control group and in the height, vascularity, and pigmentation parameters as compared with the silicone group. No side effects were experienced by the patients with either treatment and patient satisfaction was higher in the methylprednisolone group.The use of topical methylprednisolone cream in fresh wounds at the postoperative early period appears to be promising.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Ginekologia polska

18. Topical Tacrolimus as Adjuvant Therapy to Corticosteroids in Acute Endothelial Graft Rejection After Penetrating Keratoplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (PubMed)

Topical Tacrolimus as Adjuvant Therapy to Corticosteroids in Acute Endothelial Graft Rejection After Penetrating Keratoplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial. To evaluate the efficacy of topical tacrolimus 0.05% as adjuvant therapy to corticosteroids in the treatment of acute endothelial rejection of a penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) graft.Patients with the clinical diagnosis of acute endothelial rejection of a PKP graft were randomized into 2 groups-group 1: receiving topical tacrolimus 0.05 (...) % as adjuvant therapy to corticosteroid treatment and group 2: receiving only corticosteroid treatment. Main outcome measures were rejection reversal, time to rejection reversal, and recurrence of rejection.Thirty-one eyes of 31 patients (17 and 14 eyes in group 1 and 2, respectively) were included in the study. The rejection episode completely resolved in 88.2% of patients in group 1 and 85.7% of patients in group 2 [hazard ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.28-1.29, P = 0.191]. After adjusting

2018 Cornea

19. Comparing clinical effects of photodynamic therapy as a novel method with topical corticosteroid for treatment of Oral Lichen Planus. (PubMed)

Comparing clinical effects of photodynamic therapy as a novel method with topical corticosteroid for treatment of Oral Lichen Planus. Oral lichen planus is an autoimmune disorder with several challenges in treatment. Photodynamic therapy has been proposed as a new treatment option for the disease.The present study compared the clinical effects of photodynamic therapy to dexamethasone mouthwash in the treatment of oral lichen planus lesions.In this randomized clinical trial, 30 patients

2018 Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy

20. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Vasoconstrictor Potency of Topical 0.25% Desoximetasone Spray: A High to Super High Range of Potency (Class I to Class II) Corticosteroid Formulation. (PubMed)

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Vasoconstrictor Potency of Topical 0.25% Desoximetasone Spray: A High to Super High Range of Potency (Class I to Class II) Corticosteroid Formulation. Topical corticosteroids offer great efficacy in controlling a wide variety of dermatoses. Traditional ointment vehicles are messy and difficult to apply, which might limit adherence. Alternative vehicle formulations such as topical sprays might improve adherence due to their ease (...) of application. The potency of desoximetasone spray is not fully characterized.To evaluate the relative vasoconstrictive potency of desoximetasone 0.25% topical spray formulation.This is a randomized, blinded, single-center study comparing the vasoconstrictive properties of desoximetasone 0.25% topical spray to placebo and seven other known potency topical corticosteroid formulations. The primary endpoint was the degree of vasoconstriction measured using a colorimeter device.Thirty-two healthy subjects met

2018 Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>