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Tongue Carcinoma

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1761. Prospective randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated versus conventional radiotherapy in stages III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma. (PubMed)

Prospective randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated versus conventional radiotherapy in stages III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma. From April 1986 to May 1989, 112 patients seen at a single institution with previously untreated squamous cell oropharynx carcinoma, Stages III and IV, were randomly assigned to 66 Gy in 33 fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional RT) versus 70.4 Gy in 64 fractions of 1.1 Gy given twice a day with a minimal interfraction interval of 6 hours (hyperfractionated RT (...) ). The overall time for both arms was 6 1/2 weeks. Patients were stratified by site (base of the tongue vs others), T stage (T1/T2 vs T3 vs T4), N stage (N0/N1 vs N2 vs N3), and lymphnode size (less than 6 cm vs greater than 6 cm). As of January 1990, an analysis was performed in 98 patients (8 patients in the conventional arm and 6 in the hyperfractionation not included). The groups were balanced by age, performance status, stage, and site of the primary disease. The median follow-up time was 25 months

1991 International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1762. Hyperfractionation versus conventional fractionation in oropharyngeal carcinoma: final analysis of a randomized trial of the EORTC cooperative group of radiotherapy. (PubMed)

Hyperfractionation versus conventional fractionation in oropharyngeal carcinoma: final analysis of a randomized trial of the EORTC cooperative group of radiotherapy. EORTC protocol 22791 compared once daily fractionation (CF) of 70 Gy in 35-40 fractions in 7-8 weeks, to pure hyperfractionation (HF) of 80.5 Gy in 70 fractions in 7 weeks using 2 fractions of 1.15 Gy per day, in T2-T3 oropharyngeal carcinoma (excluding base of tongue), N0,N1 of less than 3 cm. From 1980 to 1987, 356 patients were

1992 Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1763. "Compensated" split-course versus continuous radiation therapy of carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. Final results of a prospective randomized clinical trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. (PubMed)

"Compensated" split-course versus continuous radiation therapy of carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. Final results of a prospective randomized clinical trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a prospective comparison of a compensated split course radiotherapy technique (300 cGy x 10, 3 weeks rest, 300 cGy x 10), versus continuous radiotherapy (200-220 cGy up to 6000-6600 cGy), in 137 evaluable patients. The complete response (CR) was 57 (...) was enlarged by the addition of cases from similar trials of nasopharynx and base of tongue lesions, the survival difference was eliminated. On the basis of the results of this study we conclude that the stated compensated split-course technique gives equal clinical results as conventional continuous therapy, with the advantage of requiring fewer radiation fractions, and less burden on the patient and therapy facilities.

1993 American journal of clinical oncology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1764. [Preliminary results of a prospective randomized study of primary chemotherapy in carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx]. (PubMed)

and hypopharynx are too small for a statistically significant statement. However, preliminary data indicate a better overall and disease-free survival without chemotherapy in these patients. Therefore, we now recommend induction chemotherapy in all patients with stage T2-T3 and N0-N2 carcinomas of the oral cavity and tonsils prior to surgery but not in patients with cancers of the hypopharynx and base of tongue. (...) [Preliminary results of a prospective randomized study of primary chemotherapy in carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx]. Although induction chemotherapie given prior to local therapy produces encouraging initial response rates in head and neck cancer, randomized studies have failed to demonstrate an advantage in survival. All randomized studies have included only patients with far advanced stage III and IV disease. To us this is the main reason for the low rate of complete responses

1995 HNO Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1765. Supraomohyoid neck dissection in the treatment of T1/T2 squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity. (PubMed)

Supraomohyoid neck dissection in the treatment of T1/T2 squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity. Recent studies in patients with previously untreated T1 and T2 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue and floor of the mouth have shown a relationship between tumor thickness, neck metastasis, and survival. Our study was conducted to determine the indication of elective neck dissection in patients with early oral cavity SCC.Sixty-seven patients were stratified by stage (T1 and T2 NO), and those (...) in each stage were randomized to receive one of two types of treatment; resection alone (RA) or resection plus elective supraomohyoid neck dissection (RSOND). Fifty-two patients (78%) were men and 15 (22%) were women. The median age was 57 years old (range 34 to 95).Twenty-six (39%) patients had tumor in the floor of the mouth and 41 (61%), in the tongue. Using the criteria of the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), 1987, we classified 31 tumors (46%) as T1 lesions and 36 (54%) as T2 lesions

1994 American journal of surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1766. Gene Therapy in Preventing Cancer in Patients With Premalignant Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity or Pharynx

or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Oropharyngeal Cancer Stage 0 Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Stage 0 Oropharyngeal Cancer Tongue Cancer Biological: Ad5CMV-p53 gene Other: laboratory biomarker analysis Phase 1 Phase 2 Detailed Description: OBJECTIVES: I. Determine the acute toxic effects of Ad5CMV-p53 gene administered as an oral rinse and as an intramucosal injection in patients with diffuse premalignant carcinoma of the oral cavity or oral pharynx. II. Determine the maximum (...) Gene Therapy in Preventing Cancer in Patients With Premalignant Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity or Pharynx Gene Therapy in Preventing Cancer in Patients With Premalignant Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity or Pharynx - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2003 Clinical Trials

1767. Chronic glossopharyngeal neuralgic pain associated with mucoepidermoid carcinoma (PubMed)

Chronic glossopharyngeal neuralgic pain associated with mucoepidermoid carcinoma 4027828 1985 10 22 2018 11 13 0820-3946 133 6 1985 Sep 15 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne CMAJ Chronic glossopharyngeal neuralgic pain associated with mucoepidermoid carcinoma. 579-80 Pickell G G eng Case Reports Journal Article Canada CMAJ 9711805 0820-3946 AIM IM Carcinoma complications diagnosis Facial Neuralgia etiology Humans Male Middle Aged Pharynx (...) Tongue Tongue Neoplasms complications diagnosis 1985 9 15 1985 9 15 0 1 1985 9 15 0 0 ppublish 4027828 PMC1346223 Cancer. 1984 Apr 15;53(8):1741-5 6697313 J Oral Surg. 1976 Dec;34(12):1063 1069104 Cancer. 1962 Jul-Aug;15:801-17 13868817 Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1984 Apr;108(4):321-5 6546673 Histopathology. 1978 Jan;2(1):19-29 208950 Laryngoscope. 1977 Nov;87(11):1899-903 916785 J Oral Surg. 1976 Oct;34(10):871 1067386 Am J Surg. 1978 Oct;136(4):461-8 707726 Ann Surg. 1945 Nov;122(5):820-44 17858687

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1985 Canadian Medical Association Journal

1768. Local control of oropharyngeal carcinoma after two accelerated hyperfractionation radiation therapy schemes. (PubMed)

of the treatment was continued on the twice daily program with 1.6 Gy/fraction for a total of 64 Gy, designated as the b.i.d.-b.i.d. program. We evaluated the local control rates of 140 patients with squamous cell carcinomas arising from the oropharynx, that is faucial tonsil and base of tongue. After these treatment regimens, the 36 month actuarial local rates for the T1-4 lesions were 56% for b.i.d.-q.d. (52 patients) and 85% for b.i.d.-b.i.d. (88 patients) with a p value of 0.0013. For the T1-2 lesions (...) Local control of oropharyngeal carcinoma after two accelerated hyperfractionation radiation therapy schemes. In October 1979 we started an accelerated hyperfractionation program consisting of 1.6 Gy/fraction, 2 fractions/day for 12 days or 38.4 Gy. Due to acute toxicity, the patients were then given a 2-week break and resumed once daily radiation therapy with 1.8 Gy/fraction up to 65 Gy, designated as the b.i.d.-q.d. program. In August 1982, the program was changed and the latter part

1988 International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics

1769. What are the causes of a sore tongue?

. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com What are the causes of a sore tongue? GP Notebook has a chapter on sore tongue [1], this reports: “Sore tongues fall into three main categories: the result of recognisable disease: - glossitis of anaemia e.g. B12 or folate deficiency - Crohn's disease - coeliac disease - carcinoma geographic tongue - benign migratory (...) What are the causes of a sore tongue? What are the causes of a sore tongue? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example

2007 TRIP Answers

1770. What investigations are helpful for recurrent sore tongue with probable lingual papillitis in the absence of oral thrush?

pizza, etc.), or injury from a sharp tooth or jagged dental plate. Other painful focal lesions are carcinoma, tuberculosis, syphilis (often painless), and herpes simplex ulcers. When the tongue is completely normal, trigeminal neuralgia, polymyositis, trichinosis, and calculus of the submaxillary gland should be considered. DIAGNOSTIC WORKUP Most lesions will respond to conservative treatment and time. In patients with signs of systemic disease and vitamin deficiency, the workup includes serum B12 (...) What investigations are helpful for recurrent sore tongue with probable lingual papillitis in the absence of oral thrush? What investigations are helpful for recurrent sore tongue with probable lingual papillitis in the absence of oral thrush? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words

2007 TRIP Answers

1771. Collagenase-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-8) plays a protective role in tongue cancer (PubMed)

Collagenase-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-8) plays a protective role in tongue cancer Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue is the most common cancer in the oral cavity and has a high mortality rate. A total of 90 mobile tongue SCC samples were analysed for Bryne's malignancy scores, microvascular density, and thickness of the SCC sections. In addition, the staining pattern of cyclooxygenase-2, alphavbeta6 integrin, the laminin-5 gamma2-chain, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -7, -8 (...) -type mice exposed to carcinogen 4-Nitroquinoline-N-oxide. Consistently, oestrogen-induced MMP-8 expression in cultured HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells, and MMP-8 cleaved oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta. According to these data, we propose that, contrary to the role of most proteases produced by human carcinomas, MMP-8 has a protective, probably oestrogen-related role in the growth of mobile tongue SCCs.

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2008 British journal of cancer

1772. Effect of dendritic cell vaccine against a tongue squamous cell cancer cell line (Tca8113) in vivo and in vitro. (PubMed)

cells activated by the DC-based vaccine killed Tca8113 cells in vitro (P<0.01), postponed tumour doubling time of the implanted tumours in nude mice (P<0.01) and inhibited the growth of the tumours (P<0.05). These results show that DCs from monocytes induce a lymphocyte-mediated immune response against tongue squamous carcinoma, and could be used as a vehicle for tumour antigens. (...) Effect of dendritic cell vaccine against a tongue squamous cell cancer cell line (Tca8113) in vivo and in vitro. Dendritic cells (DCs), as primary antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to activate naïve T lymphocytes, are considered to be promising adjuvants for immunity against cancer. In this study, the effect of T lymphocyte-mediated immunity induced by a DC vaccine against Tca8113 cells in vivo and in vitro was evaluated. DCs were from human peripheral blood monocytes cultured

2006 International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

1773. Novel OK-432-conjugated tumor vaccines induce tumor-specific immunity against murine tongue cancer. (PubMed)

Novel OK-432-conjugated tumor vaccines induce tumor-specific immunity against murine tongue cancer. Priming with tumor antigens is one of the most important strategies in cancer immunotherapy. To enhance tumor antigenicity, OK-432, a streptococcal preparation, was coupled to squamous cell carcinoma (KLN-205) by means of a 0.2% glutaraldehyde method. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether OK-432-conjugated tumor vaccines could induce tumor-specific immunity. Our originally (...) developed mouse tongue cancer model was used throughout this work for the analysis of antitumor effects. Prepared OK-432-conjugated KLN-205 vaccines were immunized 3 times to DBA/2 mice. The results showed that the KLN-205 vaccines induced cytolytic activity and strongly suppressed both KLN-205 tumor incidence and growth, and survival of the mice was improved. Moreover, the histological results showed that a greater number of lymphocytes had infiltrated around tumor cells by 24 hours after tumor

2003 Journal of Dental Research

1774. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in epithelial cells in vivo: rare detection of EBV replication in tongue mucosa but not in salivary glands. (PubMed)

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in epithelial cells in vivo: rare detection of EBV replication in tongue mucosa but not in salivary glands. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is transmitted through saliva, but the cellular source is controversial. Putative reservoirs include oral epithelium and salivary glands. Tongue mucosal samples, salivary glands, and tongue carcinomas were studied, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, for evidence of EBV infection. EBV replication was seen in 1.3 (...) % of tongue mucosal samples. No latent infection was found at this site. EBV infection was detected neither in normal salivary glands nor in tongue carcinomas. Thus, EBV replication occurs infrequently in tongue epithelial cells, and salivary glands are unlikely to harbor EBV. EBV is unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of tongue cancer.

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2005 Journal of Infectious Diseases

1775. Repair of anterior floor of mouth defects by a central or paramedian island tongue flap. (PubMed)

this tongue flap. The modification consists of a 90 degrees twisting of the flap to achieve a more appropriate adaptation to the defect. In the case of spreading carcinoma from the floor of the mouth to the central portion of the tongue, a similar paramedian one-sided tongue flap was created instead of a central island tongue flap. Our present experience consists of a small series of 12 patients. The procedures were successful in all patients. No remarkable disturbances of speech or deglutition were (...) Repair of anterior floor of mouth defects by a central or paramedian island tongue flap. One method for restoring the anterior floor of mouth defects resulting from T(1) and especially T(2) cancer excision involves the creation of a myomucosal island flap from the dorsal median portion of the tongue and transferring it as a transit flap to the floor of the mouth. We are not the first to advocate this method. In this paper we present a previously unreported, slightly modified technique utilizing

2003 Journal of Laryngology & Otology

1776. Analysis of treatment results for base of tongue cancer. (PubMed)

patients with biopsy-proven squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue who were treated with curative intent by one of five modalities and were all eligible for 5-year follow-up. The treatment modalities included local resection alone, composite resection alone, radiation therapy alone, local resection with radiation therapy, and composite resection with radiation therapy. Multiple diagnostic, treatment, and follow-up parameters were studied using standard statistical analysis to determine (...) Analysis of treatment results for base of tongue cancer. The study reported the results of treatment for base of tongue cancer with five different treatment modalities with long-term follow-up.This was a retrospective study of 262 patients with base of tongue cancer treated in the Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Radiation Therapy at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, MO) from July 1955 to January 1998.The study population included previously untreated

2003 Laryngoscope

1777. High expression of CD105 as a prognostic predictor of early tongue cancer. (PubMed)

High expression of CD105 as a prognostic predictor of early tongue cancer. The purpose of this article is to investigate the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endoglin (CD105) in the biopsy tissues of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in early tumor stages and their relationship with the clinicopathologic features.The authors conducted retrospective clinical and biologic studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the expressions of VEGF and CD105 (...) in the biopsy tissues taken from 94 patients with T1 and T2 tongue cancers. The expressions of VEGF and CD105 were analyzed and correlated to the clinicopathologic features of these patients.High expressions of VEGF and CD105 significantly correlated with a relatively advanced tumor stage (P=.001 and P<.001), positive nodal status (P<.001 and P<.001), presence of tumor necrosis (P=.022 and P=.01), and greater tumor thickness (P<.001 and P<.001), respectively. In addition, high expression of CD105 correlated

2006 Laryngoscope

1778. Chronic periodontitis and the risk of tongue cancer. (PubMed)

Chronic periodontitis and the risk of tongue cancer. To assess the association between the history of chronic periodontitis and the risk of tongue cancer.Case-control study using preexisting data from patients admitted between June 15, 1999, and November 17, 2005.Department of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Prosthetics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), Buffalo, NY.The cases comprised 51 non-Hispanic white men newly diagnosed as having primary squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (...) , and the controls, 54 non-Hispanic white men evaluated during the same period but with negative results for malignancy. Children (aged <21 years), edentulous or immunocompromised patients, and those with history of any cancer were excluded. History of periodontitis was assessed by alveolar bone loss measured from panoramic radiographs by 1 examiner blind to cancer status.Incidence of tongue cancer obtained from the RPCI Tumor Registry.After adjusting for the effects of age at diagnosis, smoking status

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2007 Archives of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery

1779. Elective management of the clinically negative neck by otolaryngologists in patients with oral tongue cancer. (PubMed)

Elective management of the clinically negative neck by otolaryngologists in patients with oral tongue cancer. The treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who have a clinically negative (cN0) neck remains controversial. Furthermore, the treatment delivered to patients with a cN0 neck by practicing otolaryngologists is not known.To determine the variability in the management of the cN0 neck in the otolaryngology community.A random survey of 763 board-certified (...) otolaryngologists in the United States.Physician respondents' preferences for observation vs treatment of the cN0 neck and the treatment modalities chosen.Forty-one percent of the surveyed physicians responded. Nearly 10% of the respondents observed all patients with a cN0 neck. Otolaryngologists who treat 35 or more new patients with cancer each year were more likely to perform elective treatment of the neck for a T2 lesion of the oral tongue than those who treat 10 or fewer patients each year (P =.03

2003 Archives of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery

1780. Tongue cancer patients have a high frequency of allelic loss at the von Hippel-Lindau gene and other loci on 3p. (PubMed)

Tongue cancer patients have a high frequency of allelic loss at the von Hippel-Lindau gene and other loci on 3p. Although genetic abnormalities on 3p have been suggested to be linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, to the authors' knowledge no study to date has examined such genetic abnormalities in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. In the current study, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was evaluated at several loci within 3p, including the von (...) Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL), in samples of tongue squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, the coding region of the intact VHL allele was screened for sequence mutations.DNA was extracted from tumor and nontumor tissues collected from 28 patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma. LOH was investigated by analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms within exon 3 of VHL and by microsatellite analysis within another 10 loci. Mutation analysis of the VHL gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR

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2007 Cancer

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