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Tissue Adhesive

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101. Generation of a monoclonal antibody recognizing the CEACAM glycan structure and inhibiting adhesion using cancer tissue-originated spheroid as an antigen (Full text)

Generation of a monoclonal antibody recognizing the CEACAM glycan structure and inhibiting adhesion using cancer tissue-originated spheroid as an antigen Spheroids cultured directly from tumours can better reflect in vivo tumour characteristics than two-dimensional monolayer culture or three-dimensional culture of established cell lines. In this study, we generated antibodies by directly immunizing mice with primary-cultured living spheroids from human colorectal cancer. We performed phenotypic (...) screening via recognition of the surface of the spheroids and inhibition of their adhesion to extracellular matrices to identify a monoclonal antibody, clone 5G2. The antibody inhibited cell migration in two-dimensional culture and promoted cell detachment. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry detected the 5G2 signal in many colorectal cancer spheroids, as well as patient tumours, but failed to detect in various cell lines examined. We found that 5G2 recognized the Le(a) and Le(c) on N-glycan

2016 Scientific reports PubMed abstract

102. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion (Full text)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant (...) , suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

2016 Frontiers in microbiology PubMed abstract

103. Cytotoxicity of Cyanoacrylate-Based Tissue Adhesives and Short-Term Preclinical In Vivo Biocompatibility in Abdominal Hernia Repair (Full text)

Cytotoxicity of Cyanoacrylate-Based Tissue Adhesives and Short-Term Preclinical In Vivo Biocompatibility in Abdominal Hernia Repair Cyanoacrylate(CA)-based tissue adhesives, although not widely used, are a feasible option to fix a mesh during abdominal hernia repair, due to its fast action and great bond strength. Their main disadvantage, toxicity, can be mitigated by increasing the length of their alkyl chain. The objective was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility (...) traditional suturing techniques in hernia repair; the CAs exhibited good tissue integration and effective short-term biocompatibility, with the slightest seroma and macrophage response induced by OCA.

2016 PloS one PubMed abstract

104. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation (Full text)

Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has (...) never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires

2016 BMJ case reports PubMed abstract

105. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair (Full text)

Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate the use of an amine cross-linker and addition of catalysts as two strategies to accelerate the curing rates of a recently (...) using all compositions at various time points were performed. The two most promising compositions of the fast curing adhesives were evaluated in a meniscus bucket handle lesion model and their performance was compared with that of fibrin glue. The results showed that addition of both spermidine and catalysts to the adhesive copolymer can accelerate the curing rate and that firm adhesion can already be achieved after 2 h. The adhesive strength to meniscus tissue of 3.2-3.7 N was considerably higher

2016 Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine PubMed abstract

106. Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence (Full text)

Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence In S. mutans, the expression of the surface glycoprotein Cnm mediates binding to extracellular matrix proteins, endothelial cell invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. To further characterize Cnm as a virulence factor, the cnm gene from S. mutans strain OMZ175 was expressed in the non-pathogenic Lactococcus (...) colonization model, we showed that Cnm-positive strains of either S. mutans or L. lactis outcompete their Cnm-negative counterparts for tissue colonization. Finally, Cnm expression facilitated L. lactis adhesion and colonization in a rabbit model of infective endocarditis. Collectively, our results provide unequivocal evidence that binding to extracellular matrices mediated by Cnm is an important virulence attribute of S. mutans and confirm the usefulness of the L. lactis heterologous system for further

2016 Virulence PubMed abstract

107. A Critical Evaluation of Bifidobacterial Adhesion to the Host Tissue (Full text)

A Critical Evaluation of Bifidobacterial Adhesion to the Host Tissue Bifidobacteria are common inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that, despite a long history of research, have not shown any pathogenic potential whatsoever. By contrast, some bifidobacteria are associated with a number of health-related benefits for the host. The reported beneficial effects of bifidobacteria include competitive exclusion of pathogens, alleviation of symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (...) intestinal epithelial cells, mucus, and extracellular matrix components. In the present review article, we summarize the current knowledge on bifidobacterial structures that mediate adhesion to host tissue and compare these to similar structures of pathogenic bacteria. This reveals that most of the adhesive structures and mechanisms involved in adhesion of bifidobacteria to host tissue are similar or even identical to those employed by pathogens to cause disease. It is thus reasonable to assume

2016 Frontiers in microbiology PubMed abstract

108. Multifunctional and Redundant Roles of Borrelia burgdorferi Outer Surface Proteins in Tissue Adhesion, Colonization, and Complement Evasion (Full text)

Multifunctional and Redundant Roles of Borrelia burgdorferi Outer Surface Proteins in Tissue Adhesion, Colonization, and Complement Evasion Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease in the U.S., with at least 25,000 cases reported to the CDC each year. B. burgdorferi is thought to enter and exit the bloodstream to achieve rapid dissemination to distal tissue sites during infection. Travel through the bloodstream requires evasion of immune surveillance and pathogen clearance (...) in the host, a process at which B. burgdorferi is adept. B. burgdorferi encodes greater than 19 adhesive outer surface proteins many of which have been found to bind to host cells or components of the extracellular matrix. Several others bind to host complement regulatory factors, in vitro. Production of many of these adhesive proteins is tightly regulated by environmental cues, and some have been shown to aid in vascular interactions and tissue colonization, as well as survival in the blood, in vivo

2016 Frontiers in immunology PubMed abstract

109. Comparison of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives to Sutures in the Palate After Connective Tissue Graft

Comparison of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives to Sutures in the Palate After Connective Tissue Graft Comparison of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives to Sutures in the Palate After Connective Tissue Graft - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more (...) studies before adding more. Comparison of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives to Sutures in the Palate After Connective Tissue Graft The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02935426 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted

2016 Clinical Trials

110. Efficiency and Safety of Prophylactic Use of Antibiotics in Endoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesive in Gastric Varices

Efficiency and Safety of Prophylactic Use of Antibiotics in Endoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesive in Gastric Varices Efficiency and Safety of Prophylactic Use of Antibiotics in Endoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesive in Gastric Varices - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum (...) number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Efficiency and Safety of Prophylactic Use of Antibiotics in Endoscopic Injection of Tissue Adhesive in Gastric Varices The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02693951 Recruitment Status : Unknown Verified

2016 Clinical Trials

111. Tissue Adhesive vs. Sterile Strips in Cesarean Delivery

Tissue Adhesive vs. Sterile Strips in Cesarean Delivery Tissue Adhesive vs. Sterile Strips in Cesarean Delivery - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Tissue Adhesive vs. Sterile Strips in Cesarean (...) Collaborator: University of Chicago Information provided by (Responsible Party): Beth Plunkett, NorthShore University HealthSystem Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The goal of this project is to identify a strategy to reduce wound complications in women who undergo cesarean delivery by Pfannenstiel skin incision. Currently, many Pfannenstiel skin incisions are closed by subcuticular sutures followed by either placement of sterile strips or tissue A\adhesive. Either sterile strips

2016 Clinical Trials

112. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue: a novel model of placental malaria. (Full text)

Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue: a novel model of placental malaria. Placental malaria occurs when Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta. Placental parasite isolates bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) by expression of VAR2CSA on the surface of infected erythrocytes, but may sequester by other VAR2CSA mediated mechanisms, such as binding to immunoglobulins. Furthermore, other parasite antigens have (...) been associated with placental malaria. These findings have important implications for placental malaria vaccine design. The objective of this study was to adapt and describe a biologically relevant model of parasite adhesion in intact placental tissue.The ex vivo placental perfusion model was modified to study adhesion of infected erythrocytes binding to CSA, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or a transgenic parasite where P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 expression had been shut

2016 Malaria journal PubMed abstract

113. Efficacy of pain control with topical lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children: a randomized controlled trial (Full text)

Efficacy of pain control with topical lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children: a randomized controlled trial Some children feel pain during wound closures using tissue adhesives. We sought to determine whether a topically applied analgesic solution of lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine would decrease pain during tissue adhesive repair.We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded trial involving 221 children between the ages of 3 months (...) and 17 years. Patients were enrolled between March 2011 and January 2012 when presenting to a tertiary-care pediatric emergency department with lacerations requiring closure with tissue adhesive. Patients received either lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine or placebo before undergoing wound closure. Our primary outcome was the pain rating of adhesive application according to the colour Visual Analogue Scale and the Faces Pain Scale--Revised. Our secondary outcomes were physician ratings of difficulty

2013 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high PubMed abstract

114. Effect of Tissue Adhesives on Seroma Incidence After Abdominoplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. (Full text)

Effect of Tissue Adhesives on Seroma Incidence After Abdominoplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Tissue adhesives (TAs) are widely utilized in abdominoplasty to reduce postoperative seroma. However, current literature regarding TAs in abdominoplasty is limited to small studies and the findings of single institutions.The authors reviewed the current literature regarding the effects of TAs on seroma formation and other endpoints following abdominoplasty, and summarized the types of TAs

2016 Aesthetic surgery journal / the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic surgery PubMed abstract

115. Weak Evidence Supports the Biocompatibility of Non-Zinc Containing Denture Adhesives?

on The Evidence Published evidence regarding the biocompatibility of denture adhesives is very limited. Possible negative outcomes of denture adhesive use include local tissue irritation, alteration of microflora of the oral cavity, and a condition called myelopolyneuropathy secondary to the hyperzincemia resulting from excessive use of zinc containing denture adhesives. When zinc containing adhesives are excluded, low level in vivo evidence suggests denture adhesive use to be safe. More investigation (...) in this topic is recommended. Applicability Denture adhesives are widely used and can improve the stability and retention of removable dental prostheses, especially when there are anatomical limitations for denture wear. There is little available evidence regarding the biocompatibility of denture adhesives. Both of these systemic reviews show that it is possible for denture adhesive to create some degree of local tissue irritation along with some more serious potential systemic side effects. Further studies

2015 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

116. Amniotic tissue-derived allografts for treatment of plantar fasciitis

and regeneration of damaged tissue and limit inflammation and formation of scar tissue. The fetal membranes have been used to treat chronic wounds, prevent adhesions, and promote healing and regeneration of nerves and bone. Amniotic tissues may be obtained when performing elective cesarean sections for healthy pregnancies, then cleansed, sterilized, and processed. Patient Population: The focus of this health technology assessment is on amniotic tissue–derived allografts for the treatment of patients (...) Amniotic tissue-derived allografts for treatment of plantar fasciitis Amniotic tissue–derived allografts for treatment of plantar fasciitis Amniotic tissue–derived allografts for treatment of plantar fasciitis HAYES, Inc. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation HAYES, Inc.. Amniotic tissue–derived allografts for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Lansdale

2017 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

117. Biological Amnion Prevents Flexor Tendon Adhesion in Zone II: A Controlled, Multicentre Clinical Trial. (Full text)

Biological Amnion Prevents Flexor Tendon Adhesion in Zone II: A Controlled, Multicentre Clinical Trial. Tendon adhesion to surrounding tissues is the most common complication reported after tendon repair. To date, effective solutions to prevent tendon injury are still lacking.A total of 89 patients with flexor tendon injury in zone II were recruited. The patients were divided into a control group, a poly-DL-lactic acid (PDLLA) group, and an amnion group according to the different tendon (...) membrane transplantation was applied to promote healing of the flexor tendon in zone II and prevent adhesion. This technique presents a new method to solve the issue of tendon adhesion after repair.The trial was registered by identifier ChiCTR1900021769.

2019 BioMed research international Controlled trial quality: uncertain PubMed abstract

118. Mesh fixation using novel bio-adhesive coating compared to tack fixation for IPOM hernia repair: in vivo evaluation in a porcine model. (Abstract)

strength, shrinkage, adhesion scores, and histopathology in all samples.Measurements at both time points revealed that LifeMesh had fully conformed to the abdominal wall, and that its fixation strength was superior to that of the tack-fixated Symbotex and comparable to that of the tack-fixated PP. Shrinkage in all groups was similar. Adhesion scores with LifeMesh were lower than with PP and comparable with Symbotex at both time points. Histology demonstrated similar tissue responses in LifeMesh (...) and Symbotex. Lack of necrosis, mineralization, or exuberant inflammatory reaction in all three groups pointed to their good progressive integration of the mesh to the abdominal wall. By 28 days the bio-adhesive layer in LifeMesh was substantially degraded, allowing a gradual tissue ingrowth that became the main fixation mode of this mesh to the abdominal wall.The excellent incorporation of LifeMesh to the abdominal wall and its superior fixation strength, together with its low adhesion score, suggest

2019 Surgical endoscopy

119. The differentiation-associated keratinocyte protein cornifelin contributes to cell-cell adhesion of epidermal and mucosal keratinocytes. (Abstract)

The differentiation-associated keratinocyte protein cornifelin contributes to cell-cell adhesion of epidermal and mucosal keratinocytes. Cornifelin (CNFN) has been identified as protein component of epidermal corneocytes. Here, we investigated the tissue distribution of CNFN and potential consequences of CNFN-deficiency on epithelial function in in vitro models of human skin and oral mucosa. Our detailed bioinformatics and immunostaining analysis revealed that CNFN is not only expressed (...) of corneodesmosomes as detected by electron-microscopy. Using dispase treatment followed by mechanical stress, epithelial sheets of CNFN-deficient epidermal keratinocytes were easily disrupted whereas their CNFN-competent counterparts remained intact. In contrast to epidermal keratinocytes, CNFN knock-down in oral keratinocytes had a more severe effect and caused pronounced acantholysis in organotypic models of oral mucosa. Together, these findings indicate that CNFN is a structural component of the cell-adhesion

2019 Journal of Investigative Dermatology

120. Focal Adhesion Kinase and β-Catenin Cooperate to Induce Hepatocellular Carcinoma. (Abstract)

Focal Adhesion Kinase and β-Catenin Cooperate to Induce Hepatocellular Carcinoma. There is an urgent need to understand the molecular signaling pathways that drive or mediate the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) gene protein tyrosine kinase 2 is amplified in 16.4% of The Cancer Genome Atlas HCC specimens, and its amplification leads to increased FAK mRNA expression. It is not known whether the overexpression of FAK alone is sufficient to induce HCC (...) -induced HCC formation. Conclusion: FAK overexpression and β-catenin mutations often co-occur in human HCC tissues. Co-overexpression of FAK and CAT leads to HCC formation in mice through increased expression of AR; this mouse model may be useful for further studies of the molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of HCC and could lead to the identification of therapeutic targets.© 2019 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

2019 Hepatology

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