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248 results for

Tinea Corporis

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241. Double-blind comparison of itraconazole and placebo in the treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris. (PubMed)

Double-blind comparison of itraconazole and placebo in the treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris. Tinea corporis and tinea cruris are usually treated with a topical antifungal agent unless the infection is unresponsive, involves an extensive area, is chronic, or is in a difficult-to-access area. In these cases oral antifungals are frequently used.This double-blind study was undertaken to determine whether a 2-week course of oral itraconazole would produce statistically significant (...) clinical and mycologic improvement in the treatment of tinea corporis, tinea cruris, or both, over the results obtained with placebo. A second objective was to determine the safety of itraconazole, through routine measurements of serum chemistry profiles.Sixty-seven patients were entered into a double-blind, multicenter study to compare the clinical and mycologic effects of itraconazole, 100 mg daily (45 patients), and placebo (22 patients) on tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. The duration

1994 Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

242. Topical treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris with eberconazole (WAS 2160) cream 1% and 2%: a phase II dose-finding pilot study. (PubMed)

Topical treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris with eberconazole (WAS 2160) cream 1% and 2%: a phase II dose-finding pilot study. In a phase II pilot dose-finding study 60 patients with mycologically proven tinea corporis and tinea cruris were treated with eberconazole cream 1% once daily (group A, 15 patients), 1% twice daily (group B, 15 patients), 2% once daily (group C, 15 patients) or 2% twice daily (group D, 15 patients). Treatment was continued for 2 weeks after clinical cure

1996 Mycoses

243. Multicentre double-blind clinical trials of ciclopirox olamine cream 1% in the treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris. (PubMed)

Multicentre double-blind clinical trials of ciclopirox olamine cream 1% in the treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris. In separate multicentre, randomized, double-blind clinical trials, 1% ciclopirox olamine cream was compared with its cream vehicle and with 1% clotrimazole cream as treatment for tinea corporis and tinea cruris. Patients who demonstrated clinical and mycological findings consistent with the diagnoses of tinea corporis or tinea cruris were included in the study. Clinical

1986 The Journal of international medical research

244. SCH 370 (clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate) cream in patients with tinea cruris or tinea corporis. (PubMed)

SCH 370 (clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate) cream in patients with tinea cruris or tinea corporis. The safety and efficacy of SCH 370 (1 percent clotrimazole/0.05 percent betamethasone dipropionate) cream was compared with each of its individual components in 331 patients with tinea cruris or tinea corporis. The study was a multicentered, randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups design. The patients received one of three treatments applied twice a day for two weeks and returned (...) , betamethasone dipropionate achieved relief of inflammatory signs and symptoms early in the course of treatment, but SCH 370 was superior from one week on in the patients with tinea cruris and at post-treatment in the patients with tinea corporis. Mycologically, SCH 370 cream and clotrimazole were comparable at the end of the study and results were significantly better than those for betamethasone dipropionate. All three treatments were safe with no reports of unexpected or serious adverse experiences.

1984 Cutis; cutaneous medicine for the practitioner

245. Naftifine cream 1% versus econazole cream 1% in the treatment of tinea cruris and tinea corporis. (PubMed)

Naftifine cream 1% versus econazole cream 1% in the treatment of tinea cruris and tinea corporis. Data from 104 subjects with tinea cruris or tinea corporis were evaluated in this double-blind, randomized study. The subjects applied naftifine cream 1% or econazole nitrate cream 1% to affected areas twice daily for 4 weeks. After 1 week of treatment naftifine had an overall cure rate of 19% compared with 4% for econazole (p = 0.03). A difference in favor of naftifine, although not statistically

1988 Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

246. A comparison of the efficacy of oral fluconazole, 150 mg/week versus 50 mg/day, in the treatment of tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea pedis, and cutaneous candidosis. (PubMed)

A comparison of the efficacy of oral fluconazole, 150 mg/week versus 50 mg/day, in the treatment of tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea pedis, and cutaneous candidosis. 9762826 1998 11 25 2016 11 24 0011-9059 37 9 1998 Sep International journal of dermatology Int. J. Dermatol. A comparison of the efficacy of oral fluconazole, 150 mg/week versus 50 mg/day, in the treatment of tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea pedis, and cutaneous candidosis. 703-5 Nozickova M M Department of Dermatology (...) microbiology Dose-Response Relationship, Drug Drug Administration Schedule Drug Eruptions etiology Epidermophyton drug effects Female Fluconazole administration & dosage adverse effects therapeutic use Follow-Up Studies Headache chemically induced Humans Hyperlipidemias chemically induced Male Nausea chemically induced Tinea drug therapy Treatment Outcome Trichophyton drug effects 1998 10 8 1998 10 8 0 1 1998 10 8 0 0 ppublish 9762826

1998 International Journal of Dermatology

247. Efficacy and safety of terbinafine 1% solution in the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis and tinea corporis or tinea cruris. (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of terbinafine 1% solution in the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis and tinea corporis or tinea cruris. Two randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, multicenter studies assessed the efficacy and safety of a new terbinafine 1% solution for the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis and tinea corporis or tinea cruris (tinea corporis/cruris). Patients with interdigital tinea pedis applied terbinafine 1% solution or vehicle twice daily for 1 week with 7 weeks of follow (...) -up (N = 153), and patients with tinea corporis/cruris applied terbinafine 1% solution or vehicle once daily for 1 week with 3 weeks of follow-up (N = 66). Efficacy was assessed mycologically and clinically at the end of treatment and throughout follow-up. In the tinea pedis study, 66% of patients were effectively treated with terbinafine compared with 4% of the group treated by vehicle (P < .001; Mantel-Haenszel test). In the tinea corporis/cruris study, treatment was effective in 65

2001 Cutis; cutaneous medicine for the practitioner

248. Efficacy and safety of butenafine in superficial dermatophytoses (tinea pedis, tinea cruris, tinea corporis). (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of butenafine in superficial dermatophytoses (tinea pedis, tinea cruris, tinea corporis). Superficial dermatophytoses of skin are very common infections seen in clinical practice. Besides topical imidazoles, triazoles and allylamines, topical butenafine (a benzylamine derivative) is a novel agent with broad antifungal activity. One hundred and eleven patients with tinea infections were enrolled in this multicentric, randomised, single-blind non-comparative study, which (...) involved application of butenafine (1%) cream in tinea pedis (4 weeks) and tinea cruris and tinea corporis (2 weeks) cases. The results showed that butenafine causes rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (erythema itching, burning, crusting, scaling, etc), with good patient and physician acceptability of treatment. The broader spectrum fungicidal activity and better drug retention in superficial skin layers may be responsible for this beneficial effect.

2001 Journal of the Indian Medical Association

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