How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

3,717 results for

Thromboembolic Disease in Pregnancy

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

141. Practice bulletin no. 123: thromboembolism in pregnancy. (PubMed)

, the leading cause of maternal death is hemorrhage (11); however, in developed nations, where hemorrhage is more often successfully treated and prevented, thromboembolic disease is one of the leading causes of death (12). The prevalence and severity of this condition during pregnancy and the peripartum period warrant special consideration of management and therapy. Such therapy includes the treatment of acute thrombotic events and prophylaxis for those at increased risk of thrombotic events. The purpose (...) Practice bulletin no. 123: thromboembolism in pregnancy. Pregnant women have a fourfold to fivefold increased risk of thromboembolism compared with nonpregnant women (1, 2). Approximately 80% of thromboembolic events in pregnancy are venous (3), with a prevalence of 0.5–2.0 per 1,000 pregnant women (4–9). Venous thromboembolism, including pulmonary embolism, accounts for 1.1 deaths per 100,000 deliveries (3), or 9 % of all maternal deaths in the United States (10). In the developing world

2011 Obstetrics and Gynecology

142. The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland Consensus Guidelines in Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

of indications, and including 9850 patients with IBD, the 30‐day incidence of venous thromboembolism was 3.1% in IBD patients. The 30‐day incidence of venous thromboembolism was noted to be higher in patients with ulcerative colitis than in patients with Crohn's disease (4.1% vs 2.1%, P < 0.001). Importantly, the cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism increased from 1.3% at 7 days to 4.3% at 90 days after surgery in patients with IBD . Rates of postoperative venous thromboembolism are consistently (...) The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland Consensus Guidelines in Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland consensus guidelines in surgery for inflammatory bowel disease - Brown - 2018 - Colorectal Disease - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland

143. Pulmonary Disease and Pregnancy (Treatment)

and respiratory muscle function in pregnancy. Am Rev Respir Dis . 1991 Oct. 144(4):837-41. . Crapo RO. Normal cardiopulmonary physiology during pregnancy. Clin Obstet Gynecol . 1996 Mar. 39(1):3-16. . Cydulka RK, Emerman CL, Schreiber D, Molander KH, Woodruff PG, Camargo CA Jr. Acute asthma among pregnant women presenting to the emergency department. Am J Respir Crit Care Med . 1999 Sep. 160(3):887-92. . Douketis JD, Ginsberg JS. Diagnostic problems with venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy. Haemostasis (...) . 1995 Jan-Apr. 25(1-2):58-71. . Elkus R, Popovich J Jr. Respiratory physiology in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):555-65. . Ginsberg JS, Hirsh J, Rainbow AJ, Coates G. Risks to the fetus of radiologic procedures used in the diagnosis of maternal venous thromboembolic disease. Thromb Haemost . 1989 Apr 25. 61(2):189-96. . King TE Jr. Restrictive lung disease in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):607-22. . Laibl VR, Sheffield JS. Influenza and pneumonia in pregnancy. Clin

2014 eMedicine.com

144. Pulmonary Disease and Pregnancy (Overview)

and respiratory muscle function in pregnancy. Am Rev Respir Dis . 1991 Oct. 144(4):837-41. . Crapo RO. Normal cardiopulmonary physiology during pregnancy. Clin Obstet Gynecol . 1996 Mar. 39(1):3-16. . Cydulka RK, Emerman CL, Schreiber D, Molander KH, Woodruff PG, Camargo CA Jr. Acute asthma among pregnant women presenting to the emergency department. Am J Respir Crit Care Med . 1999 Sep. 160(3):887-92. . Douketis JD, Ginsberg JS. Diagnostic problems with venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy. Haemostasis (...) . 1995 Jan-Apr. 25(1-2):58-71. . Elkus R, Popovich J Jr. Respiratory physiology in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):555-65. . Ginsberg JS, Hirsh J, Rainbow AJ, Coates G. Risks to the fetus of radiologic procedures used in the diagnosis of maternal venous thromboembolic disease. Thromb Haemost . 1989 Apr 25. 61(2):189-96. . King TE Jr. Restrictive lung disease in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):607-22. . Laibl VR, Sheffield JS. Influenza and pneumonia in pregnancy. Clin

2014 eMedicine.com

145. Pulmonary Disease and Pregnancy (Follow-up)

and respiratory muscle function in pregnancy. Am Rev Respir Dis . 1991 Oct. 144(4):837-41. . Crapo RO. Normal cardiopulmonary physiology during pregnancy. Clin Obstet Gynecol . 1996 Mar. 39(1):3-16. . Cydulka RK, Emerman CL, Schreiber D, Molander KH, Woodruff PG, Camargo CA Jr. Acute asthma among pregnant women presenting to the emergency department. Am J Respir Crit Care Med . 1999 Sep. 160(3):887-92. . Douketis JD, Ginsberg JS. Diagnostic problems with venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy. Haemostasis (...) . 1995 Jan-Apr. 25(1-2):58-71. . Elkus R, Popovich J Jr. Respiratory physiology in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):555-65. . Ginsberg JS, Hirsh J, Rainbow AJ, Coates G. Risks to the fetus of radiologic procedures used in the diagnosis of maternal venous thromboembolic disease. Thromb Haemost . 1989 Apr 25. 61(2):189-96. . King TE Jr. Restrictive lung disease in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):607-22. . Laibl VR, Sheffield JS. Influenza and pneumonia in pregnancy. Clin

2014 eMedicine.com

146. Pulmonary Disease and Pregnancy (Diagnosis)

and respiratory muscle function in pregnancy. Am Rev Respir Dis . 1991 Oct. 144(4):837-41. . Crapo RO. Normal cardiopulmonary physiology during pregnancy. Clin Obstet Gynecol . 1996 Mar. 39(1):3-16. . Cydulka RK, Emerman CL, Schreiber D, Molander KH, Woodruff PG, Camargo CA Jr. Acute asthma among pregnant women presenting to the emergency department. Am J Respir Crit Care Med . 1999 Sep. 160(3):887-92. . Douketis JD, Ginsberg JS. Diagnostic problems with venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy. Haemostasis (...) . 1995 Jan-Apr. 25(1-2):58-71. . Elkus R, Popovich J Jr. Respiratory physiology in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):555-65. . Ginsberg JS, Hirsh J, Rainbow AJ, Coates G. Risks to the fetus of radiologic procedures used in the diagnosis of maternal venous thromboembolic disease. Thromb Haemost . 1989 Apr 25. 61(2):189-96. . King TE Jr. Restrictive lung disease in pregnancy. Clin Chest Med . 1992 Dec. 13(4):607-22. . Laibl VR, Sheffield JS. Influenza and pneumonia in pregnancy. Clin

2014 eMedicine.com

147. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in pregnancy and the postpartum period

diseases during pregnancy , European Heart Journal , 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy340 , 39 , 34 , (3165-3241) , (2018) . Roza Chaireti and Katarina Bremme , Risk Factors, Treatment and Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism During Pregnancy and Postpartum , Embolic Diseases - Unusual Therapies and Challenges , 10.5772/67709 , (2017) . Antonin Zoubian, Laurent Bertoletti and Paul Frappé , After deep vein thrombosis, which patients refer to vascular specialist for anticoagulant withdrawal? A Delphi study results (...) thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in pregnancy and the postpartum period National Women’s Health, Auckland City Hospital, Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand Department of Haematology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales Clinical Haematology Department, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, Monash University, Prahran, Victoria Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Adelaide, Lyell McEwin Hospital Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Women’s

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

148. Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women

, high volume hypertension than men. 289 Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use may cause a small but detectable increase in BP . 290 A small percentage of women develop frank hypertension. A family history of hypertension, pre-existing pregnancy-induced hypertension, occult renal disease, obesity, age > 35 years, COC dosage, composition and duration of use increase susceptibility to COC-induced hypertension. 290 This usually resolves within 3 months of the withdrawal of the COC. 291 COC induced (...) is 0.2, 1.3, and 2.2% per year for CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scores of 0, 1, and 2 respectively. 497 Patients with a CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score of 2 or more, should be considered for anticoagulation with: • warfarin or • NOAC 497 In those with a CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score of 1, consideration for anticoagulant therapy should be individualized. 497,498 I, B I, A I, A I, B IIa, C86 2016 Patients who are 75 years 2 Diabetes Mellitus 1 Prior Stroke or TIA or thromboembolism 2 Vascular Disease 1 Age 64-74 years 1 Female

2016 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

149. Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science

Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site (...) you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association , PhD, RN, FAHA, Chair , PhD, RN, FAHA, Vice Chair , PhD, RN, ACNS-BC , PhD, CNP, FAHA , PhD, MPH , MD, MSPH , MD , MD, MS, FAHA , MD, FAHA , and PhD, APRN, FAHA PhDon behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing, Council

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

150. Evaluation of Suspected Pulmonary Embolism In Pregnancy: An Official ATS/STR Clinical Practice Guideline

–1999. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2003;52:1–8. 2. Marik PE, Plante LA. Venous thromboembolic disease and pregnancy. N Engl J Med 2008;359:2025–2033. 3. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Green-top Guide- line No. 28: Thromboembolic Disease in Pregnancy and the Puerpe- rium: Acute Management. 2007 [accessed Oct. 4, 2011]. Available from: www.rcog.org.uk/guidelines 4. Stein PD, Woodard PK, Weg JG, Wake?eld TW, Tapson VF, Sostman HD, Sos TA, Quinn DA, Leeper KV Jr, Hull RD, et al (...) ). Accurate clinical diagnosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy is notoriously dif- ?cult due to the overlap of signs and symptoms between physio- logic changes of pregnancy and development of PE or deep venousthrombosis(DVT)(2);VTEisultimatelycon?rmedinless than 10% of pregnant women who present with concerning clin- ical features (2). Although an array of diagnostic tests is currently available, clinicians confronted with management of a pregnant woman with suspected PE are often uncertain

2011 American Thoracic Society

151. Current evidence does not support the use of a negative D-dimer to rule out suspected pulmonary embolism in pregnancy.

patients. Search Strategy Medline 1950–23rd November 2010) and Embase (1980–2nd November 2010) via NHS Evidence (http://www.library.nhs.uk/). The Cochrane Library, 23rd November 2010. MEDLINE and EMBASE: (exp pulmonary embolism/OR exp venous thromboembolism/OR venous thromboembolism.mp. OR pulmonary embolism.mp.) AND (exp pregnant women/OR exp pregnancy/OR pregnant.mp. OR pregnancy.mp.) AND (exp fibrin fibrinogen degradation products/OR exp cross-linking reagents/OR D-dimer.mp. OR cross linking (...) , Netherlands Four studies eligible for inclusion, assessing diagnostic methods in pregnant patients with clinical suspicion of DVT/PE. Systematic review of diagnostic technique Studies utilising D-dimer estimation as a diagnostic test None Low number and poor quality of studies. No prospective studies on investigative strategies identified for PTE in pregnancy. Strict predefined inclusion criteria caused rejection of >2/3 potentially eligible papers. Venous thromboembolic event rates at 20 months

2011 BestBETS

152. Relationship between ABO blood group and pregnancy complications: a systematic literature analysis (PubMed)

diseases, including cardiovascular, infectious and neoplastic disorders, is now acknowledged. However, there is controversial information on the potential association between ABO blood type and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and related disorders (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction), venous thromboembolism, post-partum haemorrhage and gestational diabetes. To elucidate the role of ABO antigens in pregnancy-related complications, we performed a systematic (...) Relationship between ABO blood group and pregnancy complications: a systematic literature analysis Given the expression of ABO blood group antigens on the surface of a wide range of human cells and tissues, the putative interplay of the ABO system in human biology outside the area of transfusion and transplantation medicine constitutes an intriguing byway of research. Thanks to evidence accumulated over more than 50 years, the involvement of the ABO system in the pathogenesis of several human

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Blood Transfusion

153. Study of the Platelet Function During the Last Month of Pregnancy

, Toulouse Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The objective is to compare women's platelet answer in the last month of pregnancy to women old enough to procreate, no pregnancy and without hormonal treatment. The hypothesis of research is that the decrease of platelet answer in pregnant women could not only limit the occurence of embolic accidents but also explain the lowest incidence of the arterial thrombosis in comparison with the venous thrombosis. Condition or disease Intervention (...) , antidepressants) Personal history of thromboembolic accident venous or arterial, Personal history of haemostasis disease Personal history of hepatic or renal disease Personal history of autoimmune disease. Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor. Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number

2016 Clinical Trials

154. Validation of Ultrasound in Predicting a Low Lying Placenta Throughout Pregnancy

: On admission for delivery of the infant and postpartum day 1 and 2 ] To assess if the increased risk of venous thromboembolism is observed in obese versus non-obese pregnant patients is due to compromised flow in the lower extremities. Secondary Outcome Measures : Establishment of venous hemodynamics by venous duplex in obese pregnancy at the time of admission for delivery [ Time Frame: On admission for delivery of the infant and postpartum day 1 and 2 ] To establish a basis for venous hemodynamics (...) Validation of Ultrasound in Predicting a Low Lying Placenta Throughout Pregnancy Validation of Ultrasound in Predicting a Low Lying Placenta Throughout Pregnancy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding

2016 Clinical Trials

155. Electronic-personalized Program for Obesity in Pregnancy to Improve Delivery

outcome including instrumental delivery and Caesarean section, as clinically relevant outcomes because the mode of delivery is one of the major goals of the obstetrical management and is is strongly associated with body mass index and gestational weight gain. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Obesity Pregnancy Behavioral: ePPOP-ID program Not Applicable Detailed Description: Our study is an open, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, controlled trial. This study will include obese (...) : No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Obese pregnant women (30 ≤ BMI < 40 kg/m2) Singleton pregnancy between 12+0 to 19+6 weeks of pregnancy Having an email address and an Internet access Exclusion Criteria: BMI < 30 kg/m2 or BMI > 40 kg/m2 History of more than 2 miscarriages Severe heart disease (arrhythmias, history of myocardial infarction) Multiple pregnancy Unstable thyroid disease Uncontrolled hypertension Pre-gestational diabetes Bariatric surgery Any medical condition that may interfere with physical

2016 Clinical Trials

156. Study to Evaluate the Safety of Repatha® in Pregnancy

by (Responsible Party): Amgen Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: To evaluate outcomes of pregnancy in females diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), exposed to Repatha® during pregnancy. This includes follow-up of their infants to the age of 12 months Condition or disease Hypercholesterolaemia Pregnancy Detailed Description: Women diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), treated at centres in Europe, South Africa and Australia, with pregnancy confirmed during (...) for additional information Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Keywords provided by Amgen: hypercholesterolaemia Lipid lowering therapies Pregnancy Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Hypercholesterolemia Hyperlipidemias Dyslipidemias Lipid Metabolism Disorders Metabolic Diseases Evolocumab Antibodies, Monoclonal Anticholesteremic Agents Hypolipidemic Agents Antimetabolites Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action Lipid Regulating Agents Immunologic Factors

2016 Clinical Trials

157. Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy

Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pulmonary Embolism (...) in Pregnancy Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy Aka: Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy II. Epidemiology See Two thirds of thromboembolic events in pregnancy are DVT (diagnosable by ) Overall risk of Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy: 3 in 10,000 Risk of increases with advancing pregnancy and especially postpartum First trimester : 1 in 50,000 Third trimester : 1 in 10,000 Two thirds of pregnancy-related occur postpartum (esp after ) III. Symptoms and signs See may be present Unilateral leg signs of may be present

2018 FP Notebook

158. Haematological malignancies in pregnancy: An overview with an emphasis on thrombotic risks. (PubMed)

-pregnant women of reproductive age. Reproductive organ involvement is observed in almost half of pregnant women with NHL. The association of acute leukaemia and pregnancy is infrequent and it is assumed that pregnancy does not accelerate the disease course. Both cancer and pregnancy induce a procoagulant state which can lead to maternal venous thromboembolism (VTE) and placental occlusion. Pregnancy in woman with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) promotes thrombotic environment, associating (...) Haematological malignancies in pregnancy: An overview with an emphasis on thrombotic risks. With increase of maternal age, the incidence of haematological malignancies during pregnancy is rising and posing diagnostic and treatment challenges. Lymphoma is the fourth most common malignancy diagnosed in pregnancy; Hodgkin lymphoma is more frequent in pregnant women than non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The proportion of highly aggressive lymphomas in pregnant women is significantly higher than in non

2016 Thrombosis and haemostasis

159. Pregnancy After Cardiac Surgery (PubMed)

Pregnancy After Cardiac Surgery Heart disease is one of the common, indirect obstetric causes of maternal death. Management of these cases may challenge the entire team providing care to the mother and fetus. Advances in cardiac surgery has improved quality of life and level of functioning of cardiovascular system of patients with congenital or acquired heart disease. These diseases complicate 0.1-4 % pregnancies. Maternal complications in the form of thromboembolic, hemorrhagic episode (...) and heart failure may occur. The fetus is in danger of effects of oral anticoagulation therapy and other medications given to the patient in order to support cardiovascular system, intrauterine growth restriction and danger of hypoxia. In recent era, we are facing more pregnant patients with previous history of surgical correction of congenital or rheumatic heart disease. In this review, we have attempted to draw a management protocol of such patients based on the available literature and various

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology of India

160. Recurrent Miscarriage, Antiphospholipid Antibodies and the Risk of Thromboembolic Disease. (PubMed)

Recurrent Miscarriage, Antiphospholipid Antibodies and the Risk of Thromboembolic Disease. Miscarriage affects 15 % of women, and while most are sporadic, there is a subset comprising 2-5 % of couples that suffers recurrent miscarriage (RM). Much work has been carried out to try to identify the RM underlying mechanisms. A subgroup of women with RM has been demonstrated to be in a prothrombotic state before pregnancy. The long-term health implications of this hypercoagulability may imply (...) an increased risk of thrombotic events, including ischemic heart disease. Moreover, the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), rather than thrombophilic genetic defects (i.e., factor V Leiden or prothrombin G202010A mutation) in patients with RM, is a determinant of thrombotic events later in life, especially among those patients having also classic cardiovascular risk factors. These facts may have therapeutic implications. The efficacy of long-term thromboprophylaxis and its associated risk

2012 Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>