How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

561 results for

Thoracolumbar Trauma

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

141. The Impact of Patient Expectations on Outcome Following Treatment for Spinal Trauma: Part 1: What Are Spine Surgeons Telling Their Patients? (PubMed)

demonstrated in various elective orthopedic populations. It is anticipated that there will be similar, if not greater, impact on outcome in a trauma setting.A questionnaire was developed, in a case-based format, to determine the information provided by spine surgeons to their patients. There were 3 questionnaires, each consisting of 5 cases and grouped by cervical spine trauma, thoracolumbar spine trauma, and spinal cord injury. These questionnaires were distributed to members of the Spine Trauma Study (...) The Impact of Patient Expectations on Outcome Following Treatment for Spinal Trauma: Part 1: What Are Spine Surgeons Telling Their Patients? Surgeon completed questionnaire.To determine information provided by spine surgeons to patients, part of a 4-part study determining the impact of patient expectations on outcome following spinal trauma.An important goal of treatment is patient satisfaction, which may be influenced by patient expectations. Impact of patient expectations on outcome has been

2010 Spine

142. Influence of routine computed tomography on predicted survival from blunt thoracoabdominal trauma (PubMed)

Influence of routine computed tomography on predicted survival from blunt thoracoabdominal trauma Many scoring systems have been proposed to predict the survival of trauma patients. This study was performed to evaluate the influence of routine thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) on the predicted survival according to the trauma injury severity score (TRISS).1,047 patients who had sustained a high-energy blunt trauma over a 3-year period were prospectively included in the study. All (...) patients underwent physical examination, conventional radiography of the chest, thoracolumbar spine and pelvis, abdominal sonography, and routine thoracoabdominal CT. From this group with routine CT, we prospectively defined a selective CT (sub)group for cases with abnormal physical examination and/or conventional radiography and/or sonography. Type and extent of injuries were recorded for both the selective and the routine CT groups. Based on the injuries found by the two different CT algorithms, we

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2010 European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery

143. Thromboprophylaxis in Traumatic and Elective Spinal Surgery: Analysis of Questionnaire Response and Current Practice of Spine Trauma Surgeons. (PubMed)

(47%) surgeons, including fatal pulmonary embolism by 19 (40%) surgeons.A basis for a consensus protocol on thromboprophylaxis in spinal trauma was attempted. No more than mechanical prophylaxis was recommended before surgery for non-SCI patients or after surgery for elective cervical spine cases. Chemical prophylaxis was commonly used after surgery in patients with SCI and in patients with elective anterior thoracolumbar surgery. (...) Thromboprophylaxis in Traumatic and Elective Spinal Surgery: Analysis of Questionnaire Response and Current Practice of Spine Trauma Surgeons. A survey on thromboprophylaxis in spinal surgery and trauma was conducted among spine trauma surgeons.Neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons from the Spinal Trauma Study Group were surveyed in an attempt to understand current practices in the perioperative administration of thromboprophylaxis in spinal surgery.Although much research has been invested

2010 Spine

144. Assessment of acute motor deficit

to have a vascular cause, but other conditions, such as oedema related to a tumour in the white matter or chronic subdural haematoma, can present with a similar history, albeit less frequently. Differentials Transient ischaemic attack Ischaemic stroke Haemorrhagic stroke Traumatic brain injury Multiple sclerosis Hypoglycaemia Focal nerve palsy Todd's paresis (postictal paralysis) Sleep disorders Subdural haematoma Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) Haematomyelia Thoracolumbar spine trauma Cervical spine (...) , or acute and catastrophic, although these features do not always help define the pathophysiology. Once the probable site of dysfunction has been identified, consideration can be given to the likely type of process involved (vascular, trauma, infection, autoimmune/inflammatory, metabolic, compression, or other). Although a general knowledge of the different systemic pathologies is helpful, there can be considerable overlap in presentations. For example, a sudden loss of motor function might often appear

2018 BMJ Best Practice

145. Canadian Urological Association guideline for the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

Canadian’s living with SB, which is the leading cause of disabling birth defect within the country. 11 12,14 In Canada, 86 000 people are living with SCI and 4300 new cases of SCI occur each year. 15 These numbers are pro- jected to increase to 121 000 individuals, with 5800 new cases a year by 2030. 15 Trauma is the most frequent cause of SCI in Canada and most commonly affects men in the 20–29-year age group. 15 Compared to international etiol- ogy, where the majority of SCI is the result of motor

2019 Canadian Urological Association

146. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Spine Surgery

density measured T- score of negative 2.5 or lower Copyright © 2019. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. Spine Surgery 15 ? Marked cervical instability on neutral resting lateral or flexion/extension radiographs with greater than or equal to 3 mm translation or greater than 11 degrees of angular difference to either adjacent level ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at the affected level due to current or past trauma, anatomic deformity, or cervical spine malignancy ? Focal kyphosis (...) in question) ? Absence of disease at all other lumbar levels, as documented by normal radiographs, and MRI showing no abnormalities or mild degenerative changes. Contraindications ? Significant facet arthropathy at the operated level ? Disease above L4-L5 ? Bony lumbar spinal stenosis ? Pars defect ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at affected level due to current or past trauma ? Lytic spondylolisthesis or degenerative spondylolisthesis of grade greater than 1 ? Allergy or sensitivity to implant

2019 AIM Specialty Health

147. Spine imaging

or lumbar injury Advanced imaging is considered medically necessary in the following scenarios: ? Acute significant trauma ? Neurologic deficit suggestive of cord injury ? Following nondiagnostic radiographs when EITHER of the following is present: o Suspected fracture o Progressive pain without neurologic findings IMAGING STUDY - CT or MRI of thoracic or lumbar spine Rationale Guidelines recommend selective use of CT in high-risk trauma patients. Patients without complaints of thoracolumbar spine (TLS (...) Infectious and Inflammatory Conditions 12 Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Pediatric only) 12 Multiple sclerosis or other white matter disease 12 Rheumatoid arthritis (Adult only) 12 Spinal infection 13 Spondyloarthropathy 13 Trauma 14 Cervical injury 14 Thoracic or lumbar injury 14 Tumor 15 Tumor 15 Miscellaneous Conditions of the Spine 15 Osteoporosis and osteopenia 15 Spinal cord infarction 16 Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis 16 Syringomyelia 16 Signs and Symptoms 16 Cauda equina syndrome 16

2019 AIM Specialty Health

148. ACR–ASNR–ASSR–SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Computed Tomography (CT) of the Spine

HA, Fredrickson BE, Lubicky JP. The value of computed tomography in thoracolumbar fractures. An analysis of one hundred consecutive cases and a new classification. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1983;65(4):461-473. 9. Obenauer S, Alamo L, Herold T, Funke M, Kopka L, Grabbe E. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT. Eur Radiol. 2002;12(8):2107-2111. 10. Rivas LA, Fishman JE, Munera F, Bajayo DE. Multislice CT in thoracic trauma (...) . Radiol Clin North Am. 2003;41(3):599-616. 11. Takase K, Sawamura Y, Igarashi K, et al. Demonstration of the artery of Adamkiewicz at multi- detector row helical CT. Radiology. 2002;223(1):39-45. 12. Wintermark M, Mouhsine E, Theumann N, et al. Thoracolumbar spine fractures in patients who have sustained severe trauma: depiction with multi-detector row CT. Radiology. 2003;227(3):681-689. 13. Blackmore CC, Mann FA, Wilson AJ. Helical CT in the primary trauma evaluation of the cervical spine

2019 American Society of Neuroradiology

149. Neuro-urology

dysfunction in neurologically intact patients with thoracolumbar spinal injuries. J Urol, 1998. 159: 965. 45. Ahlberg, J., et al. Neurological signs are common in patients with urodynamically verified “idiopathic” bladder overactivity. Neurourol Urodyn, 2002. 21: 65. 46. Bemelmans, B.L., et al. Evidence for early lower urinary tract dysfunction in clinically silent multiple sclerosis. J Urol, 1991. 145: 1219. 47. Klausner, A.P., et al. The neurogenic bladder: an update with management strategies

2019 European Association of Urology

150. Spine Surgery

or lower Copyright © 2018. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. Spine Surgery 14 ? Marked cervical instability on neutral resting lateral or flexion/extension radiographs; with greater than or equal to 3 mm translation or greater than 11 degrees of angular difference to either adjacent level ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at the affected level due to current or past trauma, anatomic deformity or cervical spine malignancy ? Focal kyphosis at the level of planned arthroplasty ? Moderate (...) defect ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at affected level due to current or past trauma ? Lytic spondylolisthesis or degenerative spondylolisthesis of grade greater than 1 ? Allergy or sensitivity to implant materials (cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, polyethylene, titanium) ? Presence of infection or tumor ? Osteopenia or osteoporosis (defined as DEXA bone density measured T-score less than -1.0) Copyright © 2018. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. Spine Surgery 18 Exclusions

2018 AIM Specialty Health

151. Appropriate Use Criteria: Imaging of the Spine

tumor assessment; developmental vertebral abnormalities) and CT myelography Abnormalities detected on other imaging studies which require additional clarification to direct treatment Fracture evaluation ? Following initial evaluation with radiographs Post-myelogram CT or CT following other cervical spine interventional procedure Post-trauma ? Neurologic deficit with possible spinal cord injury ? Progressively worsening pain Significant acute trauma to the cervical spine region When the patient’s (...) epidural steroid injection (ESI) when either of the following criteria are met: ? Documented abnormality on neurological exam in a dermatome/radicular distribution that has not previously been imaged or has progressed since a prior imaging study has been performed ? Lack of improvement or worsening during a six (6) week course of therapy with at least two (2) different forms of treatment Post-operative or post-procedure evaluation Post-trauma ? Neurologic deficit with possible spinal cord injury

2018 AIM Specialty Health

152. Management of Surgical Site Infections

for recommending for or against the intervention. 8 View background material via the SSI SR eAppendix 1 View data summaries via the SSI SR eAppendix 2 View the SSI Companion Consensus Statements DEVELOPMENT GROUP ROSTER VOTING MEMBERS 1. Douglas Lundy, MD—Co-Chair Orthopaedic Trauma Association 2. Alexander McLaren, MD—Co- Chair Musculoskeletal Infection Society 3. Peter F. Sturm, MD Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America 4. Sudheer Reddy, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 5. Gregory S. Stacy (...) , MD American College of Radiology 6. Gwo-Chin Lee, MD The Knee Society 7. Hrayr Basmajian, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 8. Thomas Fleeter, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 9. Paul Anderson, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 10. Sandra B. Nelson, MD Infectious Diseases Society of America 11. Joseph Hsu, MD Orthopaedic Trauma Association 12. Kim Chillag, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 9 View background material via the SSI SR eAppendix 1 View data

2018 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

153. Management of Vertebral Compression Fractures

Reitman, MD j ; Arjun Sahgal, MD k ; Matthew J. Scheidt, MD l ; Kristofer Schramm, MD m ; Daniel E. Wessell, MD, PhD n ; Mark J. Kransdorf, MD o ; Jonathan M. Lorenz, MD p ; Julie Bykowski, MD. q Summary of Literature Review Introduction/Background Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) can be caused by osteoporosis, neoplasms, metabolic disorders including renal osteodystrophies, congenital disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta, infections, and acute trauma. Painful VCFs may cause a marked (...) ]). Red Flag Potential Underlying Condition as Cause of LBP ? History of cancer ? Unexplained weight loss ? Immunosuppression ? Urinary infection ? Intravenous drug use ? Prolonged use of corticosteroids ? Back pain not improved with conservative management ? Fever ? Cancer or infection ? History of significant trauma ? Minor fall or heavy lift in a potentially osteoporotic or elderly individual ? Prolonged use of steroids ? Spinal fracture ? Cauda equina syndrome ? Acute onset of urinary retention

2018 American College of Radiology

154. Imaging Guidelines

Imaging Guidelines ACS TQIP BEST PRACTICES GUIDELINES IN IMAGING ER AS 1988 THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OFTable of Contents Introduction 3 1. Overview 4 Part 1: General Issues 4 Part 2: Contrast Considerations 8 Part 3: Sedation 10 2. Brain Imaging 15 3. Cervical Spine Imaging 21 4. Imaging for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury 32 5. Chest Imaging 36 6. Abdominal Imaging 40 7 . Genitourinary Imaging 45 8. Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Imaging 48 9. Whole-Body CT Imaging 51 10. Imaging in Orthopaedic Trauma 56 (...) 1 1. Imaging for Extremity Vascular Injury 60 12. Interventional Radiology for Traumatic Injuries 64 13. Imaging in Penetrating Neck Injury 72 14. Imaging in Penetrating Transthoracic Trauma 76 15. Imaging in Penetrating Abdominal Trauma 80 16. Imaging in the Trauma Patient Who Is Morbidly Obese 84 17 . Imaging in the Trauma Patient Who Is Pregnant 88 18. Imaging in Geriatric Patients with Low Energy Mechanism Injuries 92 19. Imaging for Intentional Injury in Children 96 20. Imaging at Rural

2018 American College of Surgeons

155. Neuro-urology

in neurologically intact patients with thoracolumbar spinal injuries. J Urol, 1998. 159: 965. 45. Ahlberg, J., et al. Neurological signs are common in patients with urodynamically verified “idiopathic” bladder overactivity. Neurourol Urodyn, 2002. 21: 65. 46. Bemelmans, B.L., et al. Evidence for early lower urinary tract dysfunction in clinically silent multiple sclerosis. J Urol, 1991. 145: 1219. 47. Klausner, A.P., et al. The neurogenic bladder: an update with management strategies for primary care physicians

2018 European Association of Urology

156. CRACKCast 107 – Peripheral Nerve Disorders

= Central Nervous System + Peripheral Nervous System PNS divided into 12 cranial nerves (Remember episode 105?) 31 spinal nerves (8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal). Almost all of these nerves have Sensory, Motor and autonomic function Anatomically / functionally speaking the autonomic nervous system is divided into: Sympathetic (thoracolumbar) component Parasympathetic (craniosacral) component. Note: Autonomic dysfunction may cause systemic abnormalities (e.g., Orthostasis (...) Diabetic foot ulcers ranging from 2% to 10% of the population. Mechanism: Unperceived trauma [9] List 5 causes of a plexopathy & 5 causes of an isolated mononeuropathy So here we are talking about category 3: asymmetric proximal and distal peripheral neuropathies, aka radiculopathies and plexopathies, and category 4: isolated mononeuropathies Refer to boxes 97.5 and 97.6 in Rosen’s 9 th Edition for asymmetrical proximal and distal peripheral neuropathies, and isolated mononeuropathies, respectively

2017 CandiEM

158. CIRSE Guidelines on Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation

percutaneous VAPs. Keywords Vertebral compression fracture Osteoporosis Vertebroplasty Kyphoplasty Percutaneous bone implant techniques Introduction Vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is an important cause of severe debilitating back pain, adversely affecting quality of life, physical function, psychosocial perfor- mance, mental health and survival [1, 2]. Its diverse aeti- ologies encompass osteoporosis, neoplasms (e.g. myeloma, metastasis, lymphoma and haemangioma), osteonecrosis and trauma (...) with diffuse idio- pathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and ankylosing spondylitis are highly susceptible to unstable 3-column spine fractures, even with minimal trauma [31]. • Osteomyelitis, discitis or active systemic infection. • Severe uncorrectable coagulopathy. • Allergy to bone cement or opaci?cation agents. The percutaneous augmentation techniques should not be used as prophylaxis treatment in severe osteoporotic patients. Relative • Radicular pain. • Tumour extension into the vertebral canal

2017 Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe

159. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Spine Surgery

mm translation or greater than 11 degrees of angular difference to either adjacent level ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at the affected level due to current or past trauma, anatomic deformity or cervical spine malignancy ? Focal kyphosis at the level of planned arthroplasty ? Moderate or severe spondylosis at the level to be treated, characterized by bridging osteophytes, loss of greater than 50% of normal disc height, or severely limited range of motion (i.e., less than 2 degrees (...) arthropathy at the operated level ? Disease above L4-L5 ? Bony lumbar spinal stenosis ? Pars defect ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at affected level due to current or past trauma ? Lytic spondylolisthesis or degenerative spondylolisthesis of grade greater than 1 ? Allergy or sensitivity to implant materials (cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, polyethylene, titanium) ? Presence of infection or tumor ? Osteopenia or osteoporosis (defined as DEXA bone density measured T-score less than -1.0) Copyright

2017 AIM Specialty Health

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>