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Thoracolumbar Trauma

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121. Evaluation of Usefulness of Contrast Enhanced MRI in Evaluation of Spine Trauma: Prospective Study

Evaluation of Usefulness of Contrast Enhanced MRI in Evaluation of Spine Trauma: Prospective Study Evaluation of Usefulness of Contrast Enhanced MRI in Evaluation of Spine Trauma: Prospective Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove (...) one or more studies before adding more. Evaluation of Usefulness of Contrast Enhanced MRI in Evaluation of Spine Trauma: Prospective Study The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01880944 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : June 19, 2013 Last Update Posted : October 5, 2018

2013 Clinical Trials

122. Abdominal aortic rupture from an impaling osteophyte following blunt trauma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Abdominal aortic rupture from an impaling osteophyte following blunt trauma. Blunt injury of the abdominal aorta is highly fatal. We present an unusual case of an osteophyte impaling the abdominal aorta treated by endovascular repair. A 77-year-old man sustained a thoracolumbar fracture-dislocation with posterior aortic rupture between his celiac and superior mesenteric artery origins. His aortic injury was treated with a stent graft, excluding the celiac origin. He was dismissed

2013 Journal of Vascular Surgery

123. Spinal and pelvic injuries in airborne sports: a retrospective analysis from a major Swiss trauma centre. (Abstract)

higher (OR 21.04, 95% CI 7.83-56.57, p<0.001) than in the general trauma population.Serious spinal and pelvic injuries account for most injuries sustained during airborne sporting activities. The thoracolumbar region was most often affected, but the lumbopelvic junction is also especially vulnerable as high impact forces from vertical and horizontal deceleration need to be absorbed. The frequency of spino-pelvic dissociation was very high in paragliding injuries, with a 21-fold higher odds ratio than (...) Spinal and pelvic injuries in airborne sports: a retrospective analysis from a major Swiss trauma centre. Adrenalin-seeking airborne sports like BASE-jumping, paragliding, parachuting, delta-gliding, speedflying, and skysurfing are now firmly with us as outdoor lifestyle activities and are associated with a high frequency of severe injuries, especially to the spine.Retrospective analysis of all airborne sports-associated spinal and pelvic injuries admitted to a Level I trauma centre

2012 Injury

124. [The comparison of computer assisted minimally invasive spine surgery and traditional open treatment for thoracolumbar fractures]. (Abstract)

[The comparison of computer assisted minimally invasive spine surgery and traditional open treatment for thoracolumbar fractures]. To compare the clinical results between computer assisted minimally invasive spine surgery (CAMISS) and traditional open fixation surgery which used in thoracolumbar fractures.A prospective randomized controlled trial of patients who had undergone surgery for thoracolumbar fracture from January 2006 to March 2011 was performed. The patients were randomly divided (...) > 0.05).CAMISS has the characteristics of fewer traumas, less bleeding, faster recovery, high accuracy of pedicle screws. It has comparable vertebral deformity correction and fixation result of the traditional open operation.

2011 Zhonghua wai ke za zhi [Chinese journal of surgery]

125. Current management review of thoracolumbar cord syndromes. (Abstract)

medullaris syndrome (CMS) and cauda equina syndrome (CES).To review the current management of thoracolumbar spinal cord injuries.Literature review.Index Medicus was used to search the primary literature for articles on thoracolumbar injuries. An emphasis was placed on the current management, controversies, and newer treatment options.After blunt trauma, these syndromes may reflect a continuum of dysfunction rather than a distinct clinical entity. The transitional anatomy at the thoracolumbar junction (...) Current management review of thoracolumbar cord syndromes. Injuries to the thoracolumbar spine may lead to a complex array of clinical syndromes that result from dysfunction of the anterior motor units, lumbosacral nerve roots, and/or spinal cord. Neurologic dysfunction may manifest in the lower extremities as loss of fine and gross motor function, touch, pain, temperature, and proprioceptive and vibratory sense deficits. Two clinical syndromes sometimes associated with these injuries are conus

2011 The Spine Journal

126. Evaluation of the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System in Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Trauma. (Abstract)

Evaluation of the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System in Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Trauma. Retrospective study.Evaluate the relationship among the neurologic status, the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System (TLICS) score, and the Magerl/AO classification system.A wide range of classification schemes for thoracic and lumbar spine trauma have been described, but none has achieved widespread acceptance. A recent system proposed by Vaccaro et al has been developed to improve injury (...) classification and guide surgical decision making.Analysis of 49 patients treated surgically for thoracic and lumbar spine trauma from 2003 to 2009 in 2 spine trauma centers. Clinical and radiologic data were evaluated, classifying the trauma according to American Spinal Injury Association status, the Magerl/AO classification for fractures, and the TLICS score.The mean age was 37 years (range, 17-72). Thirty-five (71%) patients had a thoracolumbar fracture (T11-L2). A posterior approach was used in all

2010 Spine

127. PLIF in thoracolumbar trauma: technique and radiological results. Full Text available with Trip Pro

PLIF in thoracolumbar trauma: technique and radiological results. Patients with fractures from the 11th thoracic to the 5th lumbar vertebra had a reconstruction of the anterior column with monocortical iliac crest autograft by using a single dorsal approach. The loss of correction was observed using X-rays pre- and post-operatively, at 3 months and after implant removal (IR). Successful fusion was assessed using computed tomography after the implant removal. To assess the loss of correction

2010 European Spine Journal

128. Therapeutic decision making in thoracolumbar spine trauma. (Abstract)

Therapeutic decision making in thoracolumbar spine trauma. Systematic literature review.A systematic review was designed to answer 3 primary research questions: (1) What is the most useful classification system for surgical and nonsurgical decision-making with regard to thoracolumbar (TL) spine injuries? (2) For a TL burst fracture with incomplete neurologic deficit, what is the optimal surgical approach and stabilization technique? (3) Is complete disruption of the posterior ligamentous (...) for the primary research questions were as follows: (1) Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System seems to be the best system available for therapeutic decision-making for TL spine injuries (strength of recommendation: weak; quality of evidence: low). (2) There is no specific surgical approach in the case of a TL burst fracture with incomplete neurologic deficit that has any advantage with regard to neurologic recovery (strength of recommendation: weak; quality of evidence: low). (3) Complete disruption

2010 Spine

129. Spinal Subdural Hemorrhage in Abusive Head Trauma: A Retrospective Study. (Abstract)

the statistical significance of the proportion of the spinal canal subdural hemorrhage in abusive head trauma versus that in accidental trauma.In the abusive head trauma cohort, 67 (26.5%) of 252 children had evaluable spinal imaging results. Of these, 38 (56%) of 67 children had undergone thoracolumbar imaging, and 24 (63%) of 38 had thoracolumbar subdural hemorrhage. Spinal imaging was performed in this cohort 0.3-141 hours after injury (mean, 23 hours ± 27 [standard deviation]), with 65 (97%) of 67 cases (...) having undergone imaging within 52 hours of injury. In the second cohort with accidental injury, only one (1%) of 70 children had spinal subdural hemorrhage at presentation; this patient had displaced occipital fracture. The comparison of incidences of spinal subdural hemorrhage in abusive head trauma versus those in accidental trauma was statistically significant (P < .001).Spinal canal subdural hemorrhage was present in more than 60% of children with abusive head trauma who underwent thoracolumbar

2011 Radiology

130. Cervical Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Alert, Neurologically Intact Trauma Patients With Persistent Midline Tenderness and Negative Computed Tomography Results. (Abstract)

Cervical Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Alert, Neurologically Intact Trauma Patients With Persistent Midline Tenderness and Negative Computed Tomography Results. We aim to determine the prevalence and factors associated with cervical discoligamentous injuries detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute, alert, neurologically intact trauma patients with computed tomography (CT) imaging negative for acute injury and persistent midline cervical spine tenderness. We present the cross (...) -sectional analysis of baseline information collected as a component of a prospective observational study.Alert, neurologically intact trauma patients presenting to a Level I trauma center with CT negative for acute injury, who underwent MRI for investigation of persistent midline cervical tenderness, were prospectively recruited. Deidentified images were assessed, and injuries were identified and graded. Outcome measures included the presence and extent of MRI-detected injury of the cervical ligaments

2011 Annals of Emergency Medicine

131. Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Reporting Standards for Type B Aortic Dissections

with an acute aortic syndrome, most commonly IMH as noted before, PAU may also be found incidentally on cross-sectional imaging in asymp- tomatic patients. Although PAUs were initially reported in association with IMH and rupture, PAU as a cause of aortic dissection was ?rst described in 1995. 44 Trauma Several grading systems have classi?ed blunt traumatic aortic injury into categories by presence of intimal tear, IMH, pseudoaneurysm, or free rupture. 45,46 Aortic dissection, as classically described (...) causes of SCI have been identi?ed after aortic dissection(seeSection4,StrokeandSpinalCordIschemia), includingsequelaeofthedissectionitselfanditstreatment. Because of the variability of the collateral network in the thoracolumbar spinal cord, endovascular coverage or sur- gicalsacri?ceofintercostalorlumbararteriescancauseSCI bycompromised?owinwatershedareas.BecauseSCIhas alsobeennotedinindividualswithpatentradiculararteries, theimportanceofperfusionpressureinthedevelopmentof SCIshouldbenotedaswell

2020 Society of Thoracic Surgeons

132. Guidelines For Professional Ultrasound Practice

. ISAS, GDPR and marketing/advertising codes added 2.6 BMUS statement on ultrasound imaging reporting added. 2.7 Revised and updated gynaecology section 2.8.6 Advice on imaging and reporting of thoracolumbar aortic aneurysms (safety critical) 2. 9 Updated renal imaging section 2. 9 Updated scrotal imaging section 2.15 Link to HEE Advanced Clinical Practice Framework added. 2.16 Patient Group Directions section updated 2.6 RCR actionable report audit added 2.14 Reference to ‘Medicine Matters’ added

2019 British Medical Ultrasound Society

133. Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) reporting standards for type B aortic dissections Full Text available with Trip Pro

incidentally on cross-sectional imaging in asymptomatic patients. Although PAUs were initially reported in association with IMH and rupture, PAU as a cause of aortic dissection was first described in 1995. x 44 Benitez, R.M., Gurbel, P.A., Chong, H., and Rajasingh, M.C. Penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch resulting in extensive and fatal dissection. Am Heart J . 1995 ; 129 : 821–823 | | | Trauma Several grading systems have classified blunt traumatic aortic injury into categories

2020 Society for Vascular Surgery

135. Assessment of acute motor deficit

to have a vascular cause, but other conditions, such as oedema related to a tumour in the white matter or chronic subdural haematoma, can present with a similar history, albeit less frequently. Differentials Transient ischaemic attack Ischaemic stroke Haemorrhagic stroke Traumatic brain injury Multiple sclerosis Hypoglycaemia Focal nerve palsy Todd's paresis (postictal paralysis) Sleep disorders Subdural haematoma Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) Haematomyelia Thoracolumbar spine trauma Cervical spine (...) , or acute and catastrophic, although these features do not always help define the pathophysiology. Once the probable site of dysfunction has been identified, consideration can be given to the likely type of process involved (vascular, trauma, infection, autoimmune/inflammatory, metabolic, compression, or other). Although a general knowledge of the different systemic pathologies is helpful, there can be considerable overlap in presentations. For example, a sudden loss of motor function might often appear

2018 BMJ Best Practice

136. Canadian Urological Association guideline for the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

Canadian’s living with SB, which is the leading cause of disabling birth defect within the country. 11 12,14 In Canada, 86 000 people are living with SCI and 4300 new cases of SCI occur each year. 15 These numbers are pro- jected to increase to 121 000 individuals, with 5800 new cases a year by 2030. 15 Trauma is the most frequent cause of SCI in Canada and most commonly affects men in the 20–29-year age group. 15 Compared to international etiol- ogy, where the majority of SCI is the result of motor

2019 Canadian Urological Association

137. ACR–ASNR–ASSR–SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Computed Tomography (CT) of the Spine

HA, Fredrickson BE, Lubicky JP. The value of computed tomography in thoracolumbar fractures. An analysis of one hundred consecutive cases and a new classification. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1983;65(4):461-473. 9. Obenauer S, Alamo L, Herold T, Funke M, Kopka L, Grabbe E. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT. Eur Radiol. 2002;12(8):2107-2111. 10. Rivas LA, Fishman JE, Munera F, Bajayo DE. Multislice CT in thoracic trauma (...) . Radiol Clin North Am. 2003;41(3):599-616. 11. Takase K, Sawamura Y, Igarashi K, et al. Demonstration of the artery of Adamkiewicz at multi- detector row helical CT. Radiology. 2002;223(1):39-45. 12. Wintermark M, Mouhsine E, Theumann N, et al. Thoracolumbar spine fractures in patients who have sustained severe trauma: depiction with multi-detector row CT. Radiology. 2003;227(3):681-689. 13. Blackmore CC, Mann FA, Wilson AJ. Helical CT in the primary trauma evaluation of the cervical spine

2019 American Society of Neuroradiology

138. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Spine Surgery

density measured T- score of negative 2.5 or lower Copyright © 2019. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. Spine Surgery 15 ? Marked cervical instability on neutral resting lateral or flexion/extension radiographs with greater than or equal to 3 mm translation or greater than 11 degrees of angular difference to either adjacent level ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at the affected level due to current or past trauma, anatomic deformity, or cervical spine malignancy ? Focal kyphosis (...) in question) ? Absence of disease at all other lumbar levels, as documented by normal radiographs, and MRI showing no abnormalities or mild degenerative changes. Contraindications ? Significant facet arthropathy at the operated level ? Disease above L4-L5 ? Bony lumbar spinal stenosis ? Pars defect ? Clinically compromised vertebral bodies at affected level due to current or past trauma ? Lytic spondylolisthesis or degenerative spondylolisthesis of grade greater than 1 ? Allergy or sensitivity to implant

2019 AIM Specialty Health

139. Spine imaging

or lumbar injury Advanced imaging is considered medically necessary in the following scenarios: ? Acute significant trauma ? Neurologic deficit suggestive of cord injury ? Following nondiagnostic radiographs when EITHER of the following is present: o Suspected fracture o Progressive pain without neurologic findings IMAGING STUDY - CT or MRI of thoracic or lumbar spine Rationale Guidelines recommend selective use of CT in high-risk trauma patients. Patients without complaints of thoracolumbar spine (TLS (...) Infectious and Inflammatory Conditions 12 Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Pediatric only) 12 Multiple sclerosis or other white matter disease 12 Rheumatoid arthritis (Adult only) 12 Spinal infection 13 Spondyloarthropathy 13 Trauma 14 Cervical injury 14 Thoracic or lumbar injury 14 Tumor 15 Tumor 15 Miscellaneous Conditions of the Spine 15 Osteoporosis and osteopenia 15 Spinal cord infarction 16 Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis 16 Syringomyelia 16 Signs and Symptoms 16 Cauda equina syndrome 16

2019 AIM Specialty Health

140. Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence

Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence ACS TRAUMA QUALITY PROGRAMS BEST PRACTICES GUIDELINES FOR TRAUMA CENTER RECOGNITION OF Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence Released November 2019Table of Contents Introduction 4 Best Practices Guidelines for Trauma Center Recognition: Child Abuse 5 1. Overview 6 2. Assessment 9 a. Clinical Screening 9 b. History 14 c. Bruising and Oral Injuries 16 d. Burns 20 e. Abusive Head Trauma 22 f. Eye Findings in Abusive Head (...) Trauma 25 g. Abdominal Injuries 28 h. Skeletal Injuries 30 i. Laboratory Screening 34 j. Imaging for Suspected Child Abuse 36 3. Intervention 43 a. Communicating with Families 43 b. Trauma-Informed Care 44 c. Teamwork 48 d. Mandated Reporting 50 Best Practices Guidelines for Trauma Center Recognition: Elder Abuse 51 1. Overview 52 2. Assessment 55 a. Identifying High-Risk Patients 55 b. Physical Signs 59 c. Screening 61 d. Laboratory Screening 62 e Imaging for Suspected Elder Abuse 63 3. Intervention

2019 American College of Surgeons

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